Why Swiss Cheese Plant Leaves Turn Yellow

Tropical plants like Monstera prefer greater humidity levels. While these plants can survive for a while in homes with an average humidity level, prolonged exposure to reduced humidity levels may cause the leaves to yellow or turn brown.

If so, clustering your Swiss Cheese Plant more closely with other plants or setting it on top of a pebble tray with water filled with water may be necessary to increase the humidity surrounding it. More information on how to make your indoor plants more humid may be found here.

Lighting Problems

Another potential reason for your Swiss Cheese plant’s browning leaves is poor illumination in your home. In order to thrive, Swiss cheese plants demand bright, indirect light.

If the plant is exposed to direct sunshine, the heat and intense rays could scorch it, turning the leaves yellow or even brown. If this is the case, relocate the plant to an area that receives bright but indirect light, away from the sun’s direct rays.

Pale yellowish leaves could also result from inadequate lighting. The plant won’t produce enough chlorophyll to keep the leaves a glossy, dark shade of green if it doesn’t receive enough light.

If you keep your Monstera in a dim space, you might also observe leaf loss, sluggish development, and the plant spreading out to seek out more light. If this is the case, you may either transfer the plant to a room with more natural light or install a grow lamp to provide it with more lighting.

Should I remove the Swiss cheese plant’s yellow leaves?

Age of a Monstera Plant If you feel that they take away too much from the plant, you can leave them on until they are mostly yellow or you can cut them off as they begin to fade. This should just be considered a natural part of your Monstera plants’ normal growth process as long as the rest of the plant is healthy and flourishing.

Yellow Leaves With Black Spots

Act quickly if the leaves on your monstera plant are turning yellow and getting black patches. Your monstera most certainly has root rot, which, if left untreated, can swiftly kill your plant.

Repot your monstera into new soil and a clean pot to treat root rot. Remove as much soil as you can from the root ball, and then cut off any rotten roots. Make sure the soil and new pot both drain well.

Once your plant has been repotted, put it in a location with plenty of bright, indirect sunshine and water it less frequently than normal. Use our Root Supplement when you water to help the roots heal and stop additional infection.

Yellow Leaves With Brown Spots

What if your leaves are browning and turning yellow? Here, the texture and color both play a significant role.

Your plant is likely underwatered if the areas are light brown, dry, or crispy; check to see if the soil is dry.

You should repot your plant as soon as possible if the areas are mushy and dark brown, as this indicates possible root rot.

You might have a bacterial infection if the spots are dry and more medium brown, however this is uncommon. Yet another thing to think about! Try carefully removing the afflicted leaves using clean hands and tools after ruling out dryness and root rot, then repotting the plant as you would for root rot. That ought to stop the virus from spreading (no pun intended).

Yellow Leaves With Brown Edges

You can have a nutritional shortage if the leaves on your monstera are yellow with crisp, brown edges. Chemical burn from too much fertilizer is another possibility. Finding out when you last fertilized is the greatest method to discern the difference. A white crust on the soil’s surface may indicate overfertilization and the accumulation of certain minerals in the soil. Here’s how to stop monsteras from overfertilizing.

Check the soil’s moisture content because the plant could also be underwater.

Should I Cut Yellow Leaves Off Monstera?

Yup! When a leaf turns yellow, it no longer benefits your plant and instead becomes a drain, thus your monstera is better off without it. Remove any yellow leaves you spot using clean shears, but first inspect your plant to see whether there’s a problem that needs to be fixed or if this is just a typical, healthy amount of leaf fall.

How frequently should a Swiss cheese plant be watered?

If possible, irrigate your Swiss cheese plant every two to four weeks while checking the soil’s moisture with a skewer. Hold off on watering if it’s damp, advise the experts at The Greenhouse People (opens in new tab).

Before watering again, make sure the top 2 inches (5 cm) are dry. Additionally, it’s crucial to check that the roots are not submerged in water and that the container has appropriate drainage.

Can yellow leaves revert to green?

Yellow leaves are beautiful in the autumn on trees like gingko and quaking aspens. However, if you notice a large number of them on your fern, green-leafed pothos, or other indoor plants, it can be a concerning sight. However, it’s not always a terrible thing.

All year long, tropical plants maintain their leaves. But the life cycle of houseplant leaves exists (like all living things). Each leaf ages, gets yellow, and eventually dies. It’s not a problem if one or two leaves are yellow. However, if several leaves start to turn yellow, it’s time to intervene.

The most frequent causes of yellowing leaves are inconsistent watering (either too much or too little) or improper illumination (too much, too little). You must determine the cause of the issue in order to prevent other leaves from becoming yellow. Learn more about additional reasons why leaves could yellow.

Usually, when a leaf on a houseplant turns yellow, it is about to die. A leaf’s green tint is caused by chlorophyll. The plant abandons the leaf after it stops producing chlorophyll and starts utilizing any remaining nutrients in the leaf. Because of this, you usually can’t convert a leaf back to green once it turns yellow. (However, in instances of nutrient deficits, yellow leaf color occasionally becomes green again with therapy.)

There are numerous types of plants that naturally produce leaves with splashes and streaks of yellow. Variegation is what we refer to as when this occurs in healthy plants. When plants are exposed to more light, variegation may appear brighter.

Conclusion: It’s not necessary to panic if a few leaves turn yellow. The yellow leaf is like a warning light, therefore you should pay attention to it. It might be a normal shedding process or it might be an indication that something is wrong.

Should I remove the yellow leaves?

Do I need to remove the yellow leaves? It varies. It’s acceptable to remove any yellow leaves that you find unsightly or bothersome. However, it is not required. Finding the issue and repairing it is preferable if you have a lot of yellow leaves, which could be caused by overwatering or inadequate sunshine.

Can leaves heal on their own? No, leaves from broken or split houseplants never heal. If you remove the damaged leaves or wait until they fall off, your plant will produce new ones to replace the ones that were harmed. After receiving enough water or fertilizer (or whatever it is they are lacking that is causing them to droop), drooping leaves may recover.

How does a Monstera look when it is overwatered?

The Swiss cheese plant, or Monstera, is a great choice for interior design because of its distinctively sized leaves. However, if not properly cared for, the plant is susceptible to temperature changes and overwatering and may display unfavorable symptoms including drooping and discolored areas on the foliage. What are the symptoms of monstera overwatering, and how can you save the plant?

The yellowing, drooping, and development of brown patches on the leaves are indications of an overwatered monstera plant. To prevent root rot, repot the monstera in a potting mixture that drains properly. Lightly water the plant to keep the soil moist, and then wait until the top 2-3 inches of soil are completely dry before watering the plant again.

How can I keep the Swiss cheese plant alive?

Watering should be your first line of defense when trying to resuscitate your monstera if you have been neglecting it. However, be sure it genuinely needs watering before you overwater it—surprisingly, too much affection can sometimes kill plants suddenly! It’s likely that your Monstera needs watering if the leaves have grown to be dry and brown and the soil is light and dry. Use a moisture meter to determine whether the soil around your Monstera has too much or not enough moisture.

Hold out for a moment before rapidly giving your dying plant a bucket of water; there are some unique methods that can make your Monstera look and feel healthier.

Before putting your monstera back in its pot and saucer, soak it for 20 to 30 minutes in a bucket of room-temperature water. After that, continue to water it sparingly but frequently over the following week or two before returning to your regular maintenance schedule. If you believe the root system is still fairly dry, you can soak for 30 minutes several times throughout the first week to ensure that the soil’s moisture level is rising.

When restoring a dying and neglected Monstera, soaking is crucial. It functions much better than simply giving it a lot of water, as the water will immediately run into the saucer and leaving the root system equally dry. Therefore, you need ensure that the soil is evenly hydrated throughout.

There are a few steps you can do to prevent wet or dry soil in the future in order to prevent overwatering or underwatering your Monstera. First off, purchasing a self-watering container enables you to be certain that your Monstera is receiving only the water it need. This self-watering pot from Amazon is something we advise.

Additionally, we advise using terracotta containers rather than plastic ones because they let some water to escape out of the sides while plastic containers trap in all the moisture, which can make the effects of overwatering on your Monstera much more pronounced.

Are Swiss cheese plants light-required?

The Swiss cheese plant naturally grows beneath the shade of big trees. It therefore favors diffused light or light that has been filtered by a sheer curtain. It will require some direct sunlight, but just for a short period of time each day. As it adjusts to your surroundings, it’s also crucial to avoid placing it in direct sunlight immediately soon because the leaves burn rapidly. Additionally, it will not produce the typical leaf holes in low light conditions.

How can I tell whether my Monstera is content?

How can you prevent your Monstera from drowning? We’ve discussed a little bit about how to avoid overwatering it. Once you get to know your Monstera and understand all of its behaviors, you’ll notice lots of indicators that it needs water. Some of them may not come as a surprise because the indications that a Monstera needs watering are also quite similar to those that other plants exhibit.

Your Monstera’s Soil Is Dry

The primary indication that a Monstera needs watering is dry soil. A Monstera deliciosa shouldn’t thrive in arid conditions, despite the fact that it’s vital to allow the soil dry up a little bit between waterings. Although too-dry soil won’t immediately kill a plant, it will hinder its capacity to grow effectively.

Since every plant and indoor environment is unique and can necessitate a different amount of time between waterings, routinely testing the soil will enable you to determine when your Monstera needs to be watered. Using your finger is the simplest method for doing this!

If the soil is dry after sticking your finger in it for about an inch, water the plant. Don’t water your Monstera just yet if it’s moist or still wet.

Your Monstera is Leaning Over

Although it is an unusual indicator, I have observed a leaning Monstera in my collection. An underwatered Monstera will begin to sag in a manner that causes the leaves to droop, which is similar to wilting. On a little Monstera, this is much simpler to see, although it can be seen on bigger plants as well.

Always examine the soil before watering because leaning plants might occasionally be an indication of a different problem, such as overwatering. Never add more water when the earth is damp; dry soil indicates that it is time to water.

Your Monstera should bounce back within a few days after receiving a thorough watering if the cause of drooping is too little water. As much stress as possible should be avoided allowing the Monstera to become this dry as it will stunt the plant’s growth.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Curling

Leaf curling is just another sign that a Monstera needs watering. The leaves of a Monstera that needs water will start to curl inward, making them appear smaller and less wide.

This is a temporary problem that almost always goes away with some time and some good watering! If the soil is dry, check it and give it a nice, thorough watering. Within a few days, the leaves ought to resume their regular state.

If they don’t, there might be another problem going on. Before watering once more, take some time to run a diagnostic.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Brown, Yellow, or Dead

An alarming sign may be the yellowing of your Monstera’s leaves. Dark green, waxy leaves are present on a healthy, happy Monstera (though younger plants or new leaves may be lighter green).

Some discoloration is expected because older Monstera leaves gradually turn yellow and drop off as they become older. However, you have an issue if you notice many sections of the plant with yellow, brown, or dead leaves or new leaves.

In addition to underwatering, additional issues that might cause leaf discoloration include overwatering, excessive or insufficient sunshine, or parasites. Don’t water the plant right away; instead, take the time to inspect it for any signs of these issues.

Although older growth will occasionally die off, you should take immediate action if any leaf loss is accompanied by other symptoms like drooping or discolouration. The soil’s moisture content should always be checked as the initial step. Water the soil deeply if it is dry. Look for indications that your plant may have been overwatered if the soil is wet.

Your Monstera Isn’t Putting Out Fenestrated Leaves

With adult Monsteras that haven’t started fenestrating or that produce leaves with holes in them, a lack of fenestration can become a problem. Fenestrations are nearly always a sign that the plant is not receiving enough light.

This can occasionally be brought on by inadequate sunlight. Examine the surroundings of the plant to rule that out. Monsteras require six to twelve hours a day of bright indirect sunlight. Try transplanting the plant to a brighter location if it isn’t receiving this much light.

Set a smart alarm to remind you to inspect the soil if lighting isn’t the issue and you think your Monstera needs extra water. This will assist you in forming the practice of routine plant maintenance. You can establish the ideal watering balance by making sure the soil is moist enough many times per week. Be careful not to overwater, though!