Why Is My New Monstera Leaf Drooping

Due mostly to its spectacular leaves, the Monstera deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) is a common houseplant. Although they are simple to care for, these fellas do have one drawback: if they feel neglected, they have a tendency to pout, which may cause your Monstera leaves to droop. Don’t panic too much. They can quickly be persuaded to recover with a little loving attention.

The most frequent cause of drooping monstera leaves is dehydration. They prefer their soil to always be just moist enough. Other contributing factors include overwatering, poor lighting, issues with fertilizer, pests, or transplant stress. The most crucial step in restoring your plant to health is figuring out what the issue is.

How can drooping be revived in Monstera?

  • Reduce the amount of fertilizer you use. Although it is recommended to use fertilizer, avoid adding any more while the plant is wilting. Once the top inch of the soil feels fairly dry (after about a week or two), water your monstera with a nice bath under the facet (or tap) to help dissolve extra salts that can build up due to fertilizer. This should also help to rehydrate the monstera’s droopy leaves.
  • Always give monstera a good soak, allowing any extra water to drip out the bottom of the pot. Give the monstera a good watering to ensure that the soil is evenly moist because drooping leaves are one of the first symptoms of drought stress. However, if the monstera’s soil is already moist, do not water because doing so could promote root rot, which would explain the plant’s drooping leaves.
  • Place your monstera in a location with strong, indirect lighting. Too much shade might result in drooping leaves and stems, while full light is too intense for leaves that are sensitive to the sun. The monstera should come back to life if you put it in a room with direct light that is bright, simulating natural lighting.
  • Make sure the temperature is between 60 and 85 degrees. Extreme heat makes the leaves lose more water, which makes them droop, and low temperatures stress the monstera, which can also make the plant droop. To mimic the temperatures in the monstera’s natural environment, keep it away from sources of indoor heat or air conditioning.
  • By frequently spraying the leaves, you can raise the humidity. When the monstera has suffered from drought-related stress, spraying the leaves helps the plant recover by reducing water loss. In order to reach the ideal level of humidity for your monstera to revive, either spritz the plant frequently or buy a plant humidifier. Monstera typically prefer around 30 percent humidity.
  • In between waterings, let the top inch of the soil dry out. If the soil is persistently damp, overwatering rather than underwatering is to blame for your monstera’s drooping. Before watering again, let the top inch or so of soil dry off. As monsteras need good drainage, make sure the monstera pot has drainage holes in the base and empty saucers and trays beneath the pot frequently to prevent water from pooling there.
  • After repotting, give the monstera a good drink and check that the potting soil is well-draining. Any plant that has been replanted may have experienced considerable root damage, which temporarily impairs its capacity to adequately absorb moisture. After repotting, thoroughly moisten the potting soil to help reduce any drought stress that might have caused the leaves to droop. For monstera, use a light, well-draining potting soil. To improve drainage and mimic the soil conditions that monstera are suited to in their natural habitat, I personally enrich the potting soil with succulent and cactus soil or orchid potting mix.
  • After transplanting your plant, recreate the natural environment for monsteras to rejuvenate drooping leaves. Your monstera should come back to life once it adjusts to its new environment if you give it plenty of bright indirect light, a regular watering schedule (typically once every seven days), increase the humidity by misting the leaves frequently, keep it away from heat sources, and avoid air conditioning.
  • To protect your monstera from drooping and to keep it growing upright, use a bamboo support. Ideally, get a particular monstera support, which is generally wrapped in moss to replicate the growing circumstances of the monstera’s native environment. Monsteras tend to climb and can droop over without support. Naturally, the monster develops upward while clinging to the support.

Are drooping Monstera leaves normal?

The most frequent cause of Monstera leaves drooping is underwatering. However, it can also be caused by dry air, chilly winds, overwatering, excessive light, or heat. Other potential causes include pests, illness, overfeeding, being rootbound, or dusty leaves.

How does each of these causes cause the leaves of Monstera plants to droop or wilt? How can you prevent it from occurring? We have solutions, additional symptoms for each cause, and explanations.

Why are the leaves on my Monstera bending over?

Monstera plants have impressively huge, exotic foliage that stands out in any indoor setting. It’s not difficult to keep the leaves looking nice, but there are a few frequent issues to look out for. The causes of Monstera leaves curling will be covered in this article, along with solutions.

Curled monstera leaves are typically an indication of low humidity or underwatering. Other factors can be your Monstera becoming rootbound, overwatering, pest infestations, heat stress, or pest infestations. Before they unfold, young leaves typically curl tightly.

I’ll go through each problem in detail as I go along to assist you figure out how to fix your Monstera plant.

How does a Monstera look when it is overwatered?

The Swiss cheese plant, or Monstera, is a great choice for interior design because of its distinctively sized leaves. However, if not properly cared for, the plant is susceptible to temperature changes and overwatering and may display unfavorable symptoms including drooping and discolored areas on the foliage. What are the symptoms of monstera overwatering, and how can you save the plant?

The yellowing, drooping, and development of brown patches on the leaves are indications of an overwatered monstera plant. To prevent root rot, repot the monstera in a potting mixture that drains properly. Lightly water the plant to keep the soil moist, and then wait until the top 2-3 inches of soil are completely dry before watering the plant again.

How long does Monstera take to perk up?

1) Remove the yellowed/blackened leaf; the damage has been done and it is now an eyesore.

2) Place the plant where you can thoroughly moisten the ground.

Pour an amount of water into the soil that is equal to its full volume, very gently.

It goes without saying that water will exit the drainage holes. You must equally moisten the entire amount of soil.

3) Position the plant directly in the center of the window, and I’m hoping you’ll leave the blinds open entirely throughout the day. The plant’s perspective of the sky is significantly limited when it is off to the side. Every plant must have the broadest vista of the sky possible (and only some plants ALSO need hours of direct sun).

After completing the aforementioned methods, your monstera plant should start to grow again if its roots are healthy. Please do that, and let me know how it goes!

How can you tell whether your Monstera is content?

How can you prevent your Monstera from drowning? We’ve discussed a little bit about how to avoid overwatering it. Once you get to know your Monstera and understand all of its behaviors, you’ll notice lots of indicators that it needs water. Some of them may not come as a surprise because the indications that a Monstera needs watering are also quite similar to those that other plants exhibit.

Your Monstera’s Soil Is Dry

The primary indication that a Monstera needs watering is dry soil. A Monstera deliciosa shouldn’t thrive in arid conditions, despite the fact that it’s vital to allow the soil dry up a little bit between waterings. Although too-dry soil won’t immediately kill a plant, it will hinder its capacity to grow effectively.

Since every plant and indoor environment is unique and can necessitate a different amount of time between waterings, routinely testing the soil will enable you to determine when your Monstera needs to be watered. Using your finger is the simplest method for doing this!

If the soil is dry after sticking your finger in it for about an inch, water the plant. Don’t water your Monstera just yet if it’s moist or still wet.

Your Monstera is Leaning Over

Although it is an unusual indicator, I have observed a leaning Monstera in my collection. An underwatered Monstera will begin to sag in a manner that causes the leaves to droop, which is similar to wilting. On a little Monstera, this is much simpler to see, although it can be seen on bigger plants as well.

Always examine the soil before watering because leaning plants might occasionally be an indication of a different problem, such as overwatering. Never add more water when the earth is damp; dry soil indicates that it is time to water.

Your Monstera should bounce back within a few days after receiving a thorough watering if the cause of drooping is too little water. As much stress as possible should be avoided allowing the Monstera to become this dry as it will stunt the plant’s growth.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Curling

Leaf curling is just another sign that a Monstera needs watering. The leaves of a Monstera that needs water will start to curl inward, making them appear smaller and less wide.

This is a temporary problem that almost always goes away with some time and some good watering! If the soil is dry, check it and give it a nice, thorough watering. Within a few days, the leaves ought to resume their regular state.

If they don’t, there might be another problem going on. Before watering once more, take some time to run a diagnostic.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Brown, Yellow, or Dead

An alarming sign may be the yellowing of your Monstera’s leaves. Dark green, waxy leaves are present on a healthy, happy Monstera (though younger plants or new leaves may be lighter green).

Some discoloration is expected because older Monstera leaves gradually turn yellow and drop off as they become older. However, you have an issue if you notice many sections of the plant with yellow, brown, or dead leaves or new leaves.

In addition to underwatering, additional issues that might cause leaf discoloration include overwatering, excessive or insufficient sunshine, or parasites. Don’t water the plant right away; instead, take the time to inspect it for any signs of these issues.

Although older growth will occasionally die off, you should take immediate action if any leaf loss is accompanied by other symptoms like drooping or discolouration. The soil’s moisture content should always be checked as the initial step. Water the soil deeply if it is dry. Look for indications that your plant may have been overwatered if the soil is wet.

Your Monstera Isn’t Putting Out Fenestrated Leaves

With adult Monsteras that haven’t started fenestrating or that produce leaves with holes in them, a lack of fenestration can become a problem. Fenestrations are nearly always a sign that the plant is not receiving enough light.

This can occasionally be brought on by inadequate sunlight. Examine the surroundings of the plant to rule that out. Monsteras require six to twelve hours a day of bright indirect sunlight. Try transplanting the plant to a brighter location if it isn’t receiving this much light.

Set a smart alarm to remind you to inspect the soil if lighting isn’t the issue and you think your Monstera needs extra water. This will assist you in forming the practice of routine plant maintenance. You can establish the ideal watering balance by making sure the soil is moist enough many times per week. Be careful not to overwater, though!

How long does a Monstera leaf take to get hard?

Your monstera houseplant may take anywhere from 1 to 7 weeks to completely unfold.

Depending on how old the leaf is and what sort of monstera plant it is, it may unfold more quickly under ideal conditions and with correct monstera care, possibly in less than a week. A monstera leaf’s time to unfold depends on a number of variables, including humidity, watering frequency, sunshine exposure, pest activity, age, and nutrient content.

Monstera leaf unfurling time lapse

Watch the monstera leaf unfold in this time-lapse film in less than a week! Don’t be discouraged if yours doesn’t unfold as swiftly as hers, even though it’s feasible. Each monstera plant is unique.

I want them all, whether they are monstera deliciosa, monstera adansonii, or even monstera obliqua!

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How can you cheer up Monstera?

PRO HINT: Monsteras love to climb up vertical surfaces because they are climbing plants. Use pegs or moss sticks to direct your Monstera’s growth upward if you prefer it to grow tall rather than wide.

A tough and simple-to-care-for species of flowering plant native to southern Mexico and Panama called Monstera deliciosa is also known as the “Due to the distinctive growth of ridges and holes, or fenestrations, on its more mature leaves, the Swiss cheese plant is called that. The “The fruit that the plant produces in its native environment, which resembles a pineapple, gives the plant its deliciosa moniker.

A warm, humid environment with plenty of water and soft sunlight are preferred by monsteras. Put your Monstera in an area with indirect light that ranges from moderate to bright. Even though it can tolerate lower light levels, you can notice lanky growth as a result, so the optimum location is a few feet away from a window that faces the south, west, or east and provides brilliant indirect light.

We offer a guide on how to measure light in your environment if you are unclear of the lighting conditions in your house or place of business.

Only the most mature leaves of the Monstera typically develop the distinctive splits, and even so, only under optimal circumstances. Just wait if yours has plenty of light but no splits.