Why Is My Monstera Plant Leaning To One Side

Right now, Monstera Deliciosa is a stylish and well-liked houseplant, and it’s simple to understand why. The room’s broad, glossy, dark-green leaves have a tropical feel to it, and under the correct circumstances, they develop swiftly. In fact, this plant’s potential for growing too large for some homes is one of its only drawbacks. When a Monstera grows large, it often tips over or leans to one side.

How can a Monstera Deliciosa be kept from leaning over? Staking a Monstera Deliciosa with a support like a moss pole, trellis, or garden stakes is the best way to keep it growing upright. These natural climbers can be trained to climb these poles by being connected to them, and they will be supported as they do so.

Although a Monstera won’t be harmed by not growing upright, most people like them to be as straight and tall as possible for aesthetic and spatial reasons. To help you keep your Monstera looking the way you want it to, I’ll go into further depth below why why this occurs in the first place.

What causes my Monstera to sag?

Due mostly to its spectacular leaves, the Monstera deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) is a common houseplant. Although they are simple to care for, these fellas do have one drawback: if they feel neglected, they have a tendency to pout, which may cause your Monstera leaves to droop. Don’t panic too much. They can quickly be persuaded to recover with a little loving attention.

The most frequent cause of drooping monstera leaves is dehydration. They prefer their soil to always be just moist enough. Other contributing factors include overwatering, poor lighting, issues with fertilizer, pests, or transplant stress. The most crucial step in restoring your plant to health is figuring out what the issue is.

How come my Monstera is uneven?

Press gifts included the Arket planter, shovel, and vase. I get a little commission from the sales of the things when you click on affiliate links that are indicated with the symbol *aff. [All images by Cate St.

I should definitely preface this piece by saying that I’m not an expert on caring for houseplants. Even though I’ve done some reading and research, I believe that a large portion of my success with plants has been luck and a south-facing space. Although I’ve had a bad history of keeping plants alive, I’ve found the monstera deliciosa to be quite foolproof for those with less than stellar green thumbs.

The monstera is a native to the tropical jungles of Mexico; it prefers direct, strong sunlight and can withstand temperatures averaging between 18 and 25 °C. The monstera, also referred to as a Swiss cheese plant, can be identified by its broad, heart-shaped leaves and their characteristic perforated pattern. With its sculptural, leathery fronds, a monstera plant will provide a room with an unmatched, bold punch of lush foliage. Although the monstera shape has been employed as a popular theme on everything from bedding to wallpaper in the world of interior design, I really like the real thing.

My monstera plant has been contently resting in a corner and only occasionally needing water (about once a week). In only under two years, it went from being a tiny pot plant to a lush, towering tangle of stalks and glossy foliage. If you were sitting on the end of the sofa closest to the monster, it started to seem a little bit like you were sheltering under a forest canopy. It makes sense that its Latin name, monstrosa, which relates to the edible fruit it can produce, translates as “monstrous.” In the correct circumstances, these people can reach heights of almost 9 meters quickly.

Because of their quick growth and hardiness, monsteras are the perfect plant for propagation, which involves taking cuttings from a mature mother plant to produce smaller, new plants. It has enabled me to add even more lovely greenery to the house and has given the older plant new vitality. I was inspired to try it after seeing Siobhan Watts do it on Instagram. It couldn’t be simpler!

The spring and summer seasons, when a monstera plant is actively growing, are the optimum times to propagate it. When the gnarly roots from the stems start to grow outside the pot, that’s when you’ll know your monstera plant is ready for multiplication. Propagation can help equalize your monstera, much like pruning a hedge, if it appears a little unbalanced due to excessive growth in one direction or if it becomes too tall and can no longer support itself. A moss pole can also be used to support a monstera plant, but it’s always wonderful to spread the joy of the outside inside, isn’t it?

Taking a stem cutting is the first step in monstera plant propagation. Don’t just randomly chop. As you can see in the example above, the stem has a lengthy root that was in the soil and a smaller, more delicate nodule where another root is beginning to take shape. Be sure to cut your stem below an aerial root or leaf node.

To boost the quantity of water it can absorb in the following stage, cut the stem at an angle.

After that, just put your cutting in a dry vase filled with water. To see the growth, I used a clear vase like this little, spherical vase (*aff), although I’m not sure if that was essential. Aerial root or node should be completely submerged in water. After that, keep an eye on it while keeping it out of direct sunlight.

The cutting on the mother plant is shown in the left image having been clipped, and the cutting in the right image has been placed in water for the first time.

A few weeks will pass before the first shoots appear. Keep in mind that while propagating can be a tedious procedure, the benefits are well worth the wait. Meanwhile, a monstera in a vase creates a lovely presentation. For months, I didn’t need to purchase fresh flowers!

I was cautioned about changing the water by someone on Instagram.

I suppose part of the nutrients must be kept in the cutting. I simply added some new water to top it off if the water level seemed a little low.

The monstera cutting was ready to be repotted into soil when it had a magnificent tangle of light-colored roots. Even with the cutting submerged in water, a fresh, vibrant green leaf had emerged.

From my favorite book, “The House of Plants,” Caro and Rose advise using a compost that contains worm castings, rock dust, and coir for important minerals as well as coir to retain moisture. I just used some garden compost because I didn’t really know where to start with any of stuff, but anything that provides your cutting the best start is a wonderful idea. At least the Kent & Stowe gardening trowel (*aff) makes me appear the part!

In compost, plant your cutting.

To aid it, you can apply a small amount of liquid fertilizer. To aid in draining, consider a pot with a hole at the bottom, such as this grey terracotta plant pot from Arket (*aff). Before adding soil, put stones, gravel, or potting grit at the bottom of your plant pot if it has a drainage hole. However, in my experience, plants that I’ve grown in pots without holes haven’t done well over time.

Make sure the monstera plant is standing erect and pat down the soil’s surface. After giving the plant some water, you’re done!

Now all I have to do is cross my fingers and hope that this plant, like the mummy plant, survives and grows.

When the top layer of soil has dried out, water your monstera plant once a week to keep it healthy. You may also spritz the plant occasionally to keep the leaves healthy and glossy or pour little water to the saucer to let the roots collect it there. In the event that the leaves become a little dusty, I will occasionally wipe them.

There we are, then

I was astounded by how simple it was to spread a monstera plant! What’s even great is that you may have an impact right away without spending any money or purchasing anything new. Why not try it if you have one that seems a touch overgrown?

I’m really enjoying adding more plants to my house and gradually raising something. It’s so rewarding to watch a plant grow and change rather than wither and perish only by looking at it. Plants not only serve to purify the air, but they also, in my opinion, make a place feel nice just by being there. They give a home life and a sense of vibrancy. And it’s oh so addictive if you find success with one plant!

How can I straighten out my Monstera plant?

Monsteras are climbing plants, therefore unlike most plants, they have not developed to support their own weight with their stems. They develop massive, enormous leaves to absorb as much sunlight as they can in the dense rainforest.

The Monstera needs longer, stronger stems to maintain itself, but this requires energy. As a result, it leverages the strength of other plants to lift itself up by grabbing onto neighboring surfaces with its aerial roots.

These wiggling protrusions from the plant’s stems, which can reach lengths of three feet, are called roots. They will cling themselves to any adjacent surface that is sturdy enough to hold the plant and latch onto it to keep it standing.

Because of its growth strategy, your Monstera requires support. There won’t be any trees nearby to climb, but it needs something to support itself, so consider what kind of support you can offer. Typically, folks will use a moss stick or a stake.

However, there are a variety of support systems you can provide, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Let’s examine a few possibilities.

Option One) A Garden Stake

The easiest and most affordable solution is frequently a plain garden stake. Simply insert a sturdy stake into the ground, then allow your Monstera to use it to climb.

To help the plant to grow straight, place it close to the center of the pot. The plant will begin to grow in that direction if a stake is only placed at one edge because that is where it is getting support. It becomes out of equilibrium as a result, which causes the issues mentioned above.

If your Monstera is already overgrown, adding stakes is a smart option because it makes it simple to gently nudge the stems back toward the middle of the pot, and you can add more than one stake if necessary. They are also portable, so you can move them about to support the plant wherever it needs it and add or remove stakes as necessary.

Stakes are more more versatile than the more intricate support systems, but they aren’t the most attractive choice. You might want to think about other options if they are ruining your Monstera’s appearance.

Option Two) A Trellis

A trellis might be a nice alternative for people who have small plants that are just starting to need support. These are quite secure and will guarantee that your plant maintains its training in one place.

Pick a trellis that can support your Monstera. Keep in mind that these plants can reach heights of up to 10 feet indoors (or even higher), which is a tremendous amount of weight for one trellis to hold.

The plant will be supported by a trellis that has numerous poles because these are typically more stronger. Additionally, they provide the plant with multiple locations to adhere to rather than just one or two, allowing it to spread out and develop thickly.

However, due to the inflexible shape, training your Monstera onto a trellis would be quite challenging if it is already half-grown or fully-grown. A trellis is rigid and cannot be rearranged to accommodate the contour of your plant. Only young Monstera plants can benefit from these.

Option Three) A Moss Stick

Moss sticks may be slightly more expensive than other options because they have been specifically created to support Monstera plants and other climbing plants. They do, however, have a number of important advantages.

Although the material of the poles varies, they are all covered in sphagnum moss to give the Monstera a surface that is comparable to one it would find in the wild.

The Monstera can root in the damp, organic material because most trees have moss and lichen growing on their bark, which may help to keep your plant happy. The moss has a lot of texture, which makes it easier for your plant to grasp and keeps it from falling.

The plant will also receive water and micronutrients from the moss, which it will take through its aerial roots. Your plant’s health is improved as a result.

The aesthetic is the next significant benefit. The sticks seem very much in keeping with the natural sense of the plant because they are covered in moss, and they will fit in well. The moss pole extends the natural beauty, whereas a trellis or pegs can ruin it.

Any moss stick you purchase must be sturdy enough to hold up your Monstera as it grows. For your plant to have several support points, think about adding more than one.

Some claim that utilizing moss sticks encourages better leaf growth and keeps Monstera healthy.

Option Four) A Coco Coir Pole

This is made to assist climbing plants, much like the moss stick. It provides support to keep your Monstera upright while also storing moisture and nutrients that the plant can use as food.

Try a coco coir pole if you don’t like the way a moss stick looks; they both have the same function and will keep your plant happy and healthy. You are free to combine the two if you’d like!

How is Monstera taught to climb?

One of the benefits of growing Monstera deliciosa inside for fans is its capacity to develop into a substantial cornerstone for a jungle-themed home. However, that expansion also creates some issues because a Monstera can quickly outgrow its allotted space. Large Monsteras typically grow outward, unlike other common houseplants with an upward, tree-like growth pattern (such the fiddle-leaf fig or rubber plant). Because of this, many people prefer their Monstera deliciosa to climb rather than trail.

How can I encourage Monstera deliciosa to climb? You can encourage your Monstera deliciosa to grow upright by providing a support system, such as a moss pole, coco coir pole, or trellis. This teaches the plant to follow its innate tendency to climb, which may result in a healthier plant with more leaves.

The good news is that Monsteras are designed for ascent. You can get this plant off the ground and out of the way if the correct circumstances and some encouragement are there. I’ll go through some specifics regarding how and why Monsteras are frequently observed climbing on moss poles throughout this article and provide you with advice on teaching this plant to climb.