Why Is My Monstera Not Growing New Leaves

Every plant goes through phases of rapid growth and periods of slower growth. A lack of new growth can be an indication of problems including poor maintenance and pest infestations, while it can frequently be attributed to dormancy and the time of year. Troubleshooting is important since it can help you avoid fixing problems inadvertently.

The majority of issues that prevent a Monstera from developing are connected to its fundamental requirements. The most frequent elements are water and sunlight, whether there is too much or too enough of either. In addition, if Monsteras are attacked by pests or develop root rot, they will stop producing new growth. The top seven reasons why your Monstera plant could not be growing are listed in the following paragraphs.

Make Sure Your Monstera Deliciosa Is Exposed To Enough Sunlight

Your Monstera Delicisoa could want additional light if it has stopped producing new leaves. Monstera Deliciosa naturally grows behind a layer of other vegetation. This indicates that in its natural environment, Monstera Deliciosa is not exposed to strong, direct light. When deciding where to put this plant in your house, keep this in mind.

Place Monstera Deliciosa in an area that receives moderate to strong indirect light. These plants thrive a short distance from windows with a south, east, or west orientation.

Your Monstera Deliciosa may begin to expand its leaves into a darker spot or corner if it is not receiving enough light. Negative phototropism is the name given to this occurrence. Monstera Deliciosa accomplishes this because it is looking for large trees to climb up in order to get the light, which may seem counter-intuitive for a plant that spreads into gloomy areas in search of light. Dark patches in the wild suggest tall trees.

It may be challenging for your plant to receive adequate sunshine throughout the winter. There are fewer daylight hours, and many farmers must relocate their plants further away from windows to prevent potentially hazardous cold and drafts. The simplest approach to guarantee that your plant receives enough sunshine is to use a full-spectrum grow lamp to augment natural light. Continually leave the grow light on for 12 to 16 hours. Avoid leaving the grow lights on constantly. A time of darkness is good for plants.

In order for your Monstera Deliciosa’s leaves to properly absorb light and photosynthesize, it is crucial to clean them.

Water Your Plant Properly

A crucial part of plant care is watering. The amount of light your plant receives, its size, the season (water less regularly in the winter), and the relative humidity of your home all affect how frequently you should water your plants. After the top two inches of soil have dried up entirely, water your Monstera Deliciosa only lightly.

You may need to modify your watering schedule if your Monstera Deliciosa is displaying symptoms. A lack of water will show up in your Monstera Deliciosa’s wilting or drooping foliage. Similarly, brown, crunchy, or curled leaves are another indication that your Monstera Deliciosa is being submerged.

Fertilize Your Monstera Deliciosa Correctly

During the spring and summer, Monstera Deliciosa grows best when fertilized every four to six weeks with a houseplant fertilizer that has been diluted to half strength. The majority of indoor plant growers advise against fertilizing during the winter. Your plant will benefit from some fertilizing if it keeps growing all winter long.

How do you get Monstera to produce more leaves?

You can obtain new leaves every two weeks if you provide plenty of light, humidity, and warmth for your Monstera deliciosa.

In general, Monstera Deliciosa develops rather quickly under the correct circumstances.

This is fantastic for those of you on a budget because it allows you to purchase a smaller one and wait rather than spending 70 on a larger one.

However, if you follow all the instructions carefully, your monstera plant should have no trouble growing new leaves on a monthly basis—more so if it is large enough to have several places of development.

However, your monstera has little control over how frequently it produces new leaves.

The plant is only present, trying its best (which it will doa plant will grow as big as it possibly can, given the opportunity).

You must give it food, water, humidity, and light so that it can flourish. It will be able to produce more leaves at once as it becomes bigger.

If your plant can develop one leaf per growth point each month, then the number of leaves it can produce will increase as the number of growth points increases.

Plants can occasionally be persuaded to begin a new grow point, but we’ll cover that in more detail later in the text.

How frequently do Monstera leaves reappear?

There may be affiliate links in this content. Your purchases generate a small commission for us. Additional Affiliate Policy

gorgeous foliage The gorgeous dark-green fenestrated leaves of monstera are the distinguishing feature that makes them stand out. Their breathtaking appearance varies from variety to variety, with the variegated ones raising the bar for beauty. In addition to the basic shade of green, this cultivar features white, yellow, or cream markings that provide a beautiful contrast of hues. In fact, the first thing you notice about any monstera variety are the leaves.

New leaves appear on healthy Monstera plants every four to six weeks. If your plants don’t produce new leaves within this time frame, you can hasten growth by giving them more attention, such as fertilizing and putting them in indirect, bright light.

Others are happy with just the right amount of leaves that continue to develop steadily, while some are interested in having a monstera with numerous leaves that eventually give it a bushy appearance. How frequently should monstera develop new leaves? We’ve answered that question in this incredibly comprehensive essay, and we’ll also explain how to hasten the process.

Why aren’t the leaves on my Monstera growing split?

The rate of leaf fenestration increases with plant age. If a mature Monstera is not splitting, attention is not being given to the plant to the same extent as it would in its natural environment. Monstera may fail to split as a result of inadequate lighting, poor soil drainage, and inadequate dietary requirements.

How can you determine if a new leaf is emerging on your Monstera?

Your monstera plant’s new leaves will be a pale shade of lime green. This is typical for immature, emerging leaves since they are thinner and have a lighter shade of green than mature leaves.

The leaves harden off as they expand and unfold, changing from a lighter green to a deeper shade of green. Compared to developing leaves, mature leaves are thicker and darker.

A pest infestation or a lack of light might be indicated by mature leaves turning pale or a lighter shade of green. They may, however, also indicate a dietary shortage.

Why are the leaves on my Monstera only getting small?

Under some circumstances, monstera plants can grow smaller leaves. It’s a frequent problem. But don’t worry, this issue can be fixed.

According to my experience, all you need to do is adjust a few things to make sure the plant is receiving what it needs.

However, in order to do that, you must first understand why your monstera’s leaves are so little.

Overwatering or underwatering, a lack of nutrients, a lack of light, low humidity, extreme temperatures, and overfertilization are some of the factors that contribute to monstera have small. Smaller leaves on your monstera may also be caused by employing the improper soil mixture or an inappropriate pot.

I’m going to go over the numerous reasons why your leaves might be little with you now.

I would also offer advice on the changes you may make to guarantee that your plant is receiving all it needs to reach its full potential.

How do you get Monstera to branch out?

Fortunately, trimming a monstera is not too difficult. Since they are a hardy plant, they don’t need to be meticulously pruned. In other words, even if you don’t perform a great job, your plant will probably be alright.

You’ll want to remember a few things, though:

1. Put on gloves. When pruning or propagating your monstera, be sure to use protective gloves because the sap is poisonous and can cause severe skin irritation.

2. Use a tidy, sharp instrument. You can avoid crushing or damaging the stem by using sharp pruning shears or a knife to make the cut. Your plant is also shielded from hazardous microorganisms by clean tools. Bacterial diseases can even spread to your other plants and are difficult to treat. (Protect your monstera from insects, fungi, and bacteria with our Houseplant Leaf Armor!)

Instead of slicing the stem off, just give it a good snip or chop while cutting. The cleanest cut will be made as a result.

3. If you can, prune in the spring, especially if you want to promote growth. Growth spurts occur in the spring and summer for the majority of plants, including monstera. Pruning in the spring will yield the best benefits and hasten the recovery of your plant. You should prune in the spring because that is when your cuttings will grow the fastest if you intend to propagate them.

4. Arrange the slices. Starting at the base of the stem, remove any outdated or diseased leaves.

Cut where you want the plant to grow if you are pruning to promote growth. Make a top cut if you want it to grow higher.

When the time comes to actually trim your monstera, keep in mind that pruning promotes growth so choose where to make your cuts. You can safely reduce the plant’s size if you’re pruning to manage your monstera’s size. Just remember that it will eventually need to be done again because it will grow back.

5. Be sure to cut below a node if you’re propagating. Don’t be concerned if you’re only trimming to reduce the size of your plant or get rid of dead leaves. However, if you want to grow your cuttings from them, make sure that they have a node, which is a tiny knob that develops on the stem opposite a leaf. When your cutting begins to grow, these will subsequently develop into aerial roots!

Try our new Houseplant Propagation Promoter!

6. Prevent unintentional proliferation. When you’re done pruning, be careful to dispose of your cuttings in the trash if you’re not going to propagate them because if you place them in a compost pile or somewhere else where they can root in the earth, they’ll start to grow roots.

I’m done now! Don’t be afraid to prune your monstera; it’s an essential yet easy component of care for this plant. This plant develops rapidly and bounces back quickly from pruning. Good fortune!

How do you determine the health of your Monstera?

How can you prevent your Monstera from drowning? We’ve discussed a little bit about how to avoid overwatering it. Once you get to know your Monstera and understand all of its behaviors, you’ll notice lots of indicators that it needs water. Some of them may not come as a surprise because the indications that a Monstera needs watering are also quite similar to those that other plants exhibit.

Your Monstera’s Soil Is Dry

The primary indication that a Monstera needs watering is dry soil. A Monstera deliciosa shouldn’t thrive in arid conditions, despite the fact that it’s vital to allow the soil dry up a little bit between waterings. Although too-dry soil won’t immediately kill a plant, it will hinder its capacity to grow effectively.

Since every plant and indoor environment is unique and can necessitate a different amount of time between waterings, routinely testing the soil will enable you to determine when your Monstera needs to be watered. Using your finger is the simplest method for doing this!

If the soil is dry after sticking your finger in it for about an inch, water the plant. Don’t water your Monstera just yet if it’s moist or still wet.

Your Monstera is Leaning Over

Although it is an unusual indicator, I have observed a leaning Monstera in my collection. An underwatered Monstera will begin to sag in a manner that causes the leaves to droop, which is similar to wilting. On a little Monstera, this is much simpler to see, although it can be seen on bigger plants as well.

Always examine the soil before watering because leaning plants might occasionally be an indication of a different problem, such as overwatering. Never add more water when the earth is damp; dry soil indicates that it is time to water.

Your Monstera should bounce back within a few days after receiving a thorough watering if the cause of drooping is too little water. As much stress as possible should be avoided allowing the Monstera to become this dry as it will stunt the plant’s growth.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Curling

Leaf curling is just another sign that a Monstera needs watering. The leaves of a Monstera that needs water will start to curl inward, making them appear smaller and less wide.

This is a temporary problem that almost always goes away with some time and some good watering! If the soil is dry, check it and give it a nice, thorough watering. Within a few days, the leaves ought to resume their regular state.

If they don’t, there might be another problem going on. Before watering once more, take some time to run a diagnostic.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Brown, Yellow, or Dead

An alarming sign may be the yellowing of your Monstera’s leaves. Dark green, waxy leaves are present on a healthy, happy Monstera (though younger plants or new leaves may be lighter green).

Some discoloration is expected because older Monstera leaves gradually turn yellow and drop off as they become older. However, you have an issue if you notice many sections of the plant with yellow, brown, or dead leaves or new leaves.

In addition to underwatering, additional issues that might cause leaf discoloration include overwatering, excessive or insufficient sunshine, or parasites. Don’t water the plant right away; instead, take the time to inspect it for any signs of these issues.

Although older growth will occasionally die off, you should take immediate action if any leaf loss is accompanied by other symptoms like drooping or discolouration. The soil’s moisture content should always be checked as the initial step. Water the soil deeply if it is dry. Look for indications that your plant may have been overwatered if the soil is wet.

Your Monstera Isn’t Putting Out Fenestrated Leaves

With adult Monsteras that haven’t started fenestrating or that produce leaves with holes in them, a lack of fenestration can become a problem. Fenestrations are nearly always a sign that the plant is not receiving enough light.

This can occasionally be brought on by inadequate sunlight. Examine the surroundings of the plant to rule that out. Monsteras require six to twelve hours a day of bright indirect sunlight. Try transplanting the plant to a brighter location if it isn’t receiving this much light.

Set a smart alarm to remind you to inspect the soil if lighting isn’t the issue and you think your Monstera needs extra water. This will assist you in forming the practice of routine plant maintenance. You can establish the ideal watering balance by making sure the soil is moist enough many times per week. Be careful not to overwater, though!