Why Is My Monstera Leaves Drooping

exceptionally dry soil

The Monstera prefers persistently moist soil. Make sure your plant is not being overwatered or overgrown. Water according to a regular schedule when the top 2-3 inches of soil are dry.

You can see weak, drooping, and perhaps even turning dark leaves if you unintentionally let the soil on your Monstera plant dry out completely. A thorough soak is necessary if the soil is very dry over the entire container.

How to soak-water your Monstera is as follows:

  • Without the saucer, put your plant in the sink or bathtub. Pour roughly 3 to 4 cups of water into your basin. Check to see if the water is warm.
  • Give your plant at least 45 minutes to absorb water through the drainage hole in the bottom of the pot.
  • After giving your plant a soak, feel the soil’s top to see if the water has gotten to the top 2-3 inches.
  • If the soil on your Monstera doesn’t feel completely saturated, water it a little from the top to hasten soaking.
  • Drain the sink or tub once the soil of your plant is evenly moist, and then leave it to rest while it completely drains. Put the plant back in its proper place on the saucer.

As a tropical plant, your Monstera will flourish in more humid conditions. By regularly spraying the leaves of your plant, using a pebble tray, or placing a humidifier close by, you can raise the humidity level in the area around it.

Are drooping Monstera leaves normal?

Due mostly to its spectacular leaves, the Monstera deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) is a common houseplant. Although they are simple to care for, these fellas do have one drawback: if they feel neglected, they have a tendency to pout, which may cause your Monstera leaves to droop. Don’t be too alarmed. They can quickly be persuaded to recover with a little loving attention.

The most frequent cause of drooping monstera leaves is dehydration. They prefer their soil to always be just moist enough. Other contributing factors include overwatering, poor lighting, issues with fertilizer, pests, or transplant stress. The most crucial step in restoring your plant to health is figuring out what the issue is.

Why are the leaves on my Monstera bending over?

Monstera plants have impressively huge, exotic foliage that stands out in any indoor setting. It’s not difficult to keep the leaves looking nice, but there are a few frequent issues to look out for. The causes of Monstera leaves curling will be covered in this article, along with solutions.

Curled monstera leaves are typically an indication of low humidity or underwatering. Other factors can be your Monstera becoming rootbound, overwatering, pest infestations, heat stress, or pest infestations. Before they unfold, young leaves typically curl tightly.

I’ll go through each problem in detail as I go along to assist you figure out how to fix your Monstera plant.

How are Monstera leaves kept upright?

Right now, Monstera Deliciosa is a stylish and well-liked houseplant, and it’s simple to understand why. The room’s broad, glossy, dark-green leaves have a tropical feel to it, and under the correct circumstances, they develop swiftly. In fact, this plant’s potential for growing too large for some homes is one of its only drawbacks. When a Monstera grows large, it often tips over or leans to one side.

How can a Monstera Deliciosa be kept from leaning over? Staking a Monstera Deliciosa with a support like a moss pole, trellis, or garden stakes is the best way to keep it growing upright. These natural climbers can be trained to climb these poles by being connected to them, and they will be supported as they do so.

Although a Monstera won’t be harmed by not growing upright, most people like them to be as straight and tall as possible for aesthetic and spatial reasons. To help you keep your Monstera looking the way you want it to, I’ll go into further depth below why why this occurs in the first place.

How can you tell if your Monstera plant needs more water?

One of those problems where there are a variety of potential causes (such as nutrient deficiency). But your monstera’s leaves could turn yellow if you overwater it or submerge it.

What’s the difference?

Overwatered: The older leaves or the leaves toward the bottom of the plant will yellow first if your monstera is receiving too much water.

Underwatered: If your monstera is very dry, yellowish leaves will begin to appear on the entire plant, possibly beginning with the younger, more delicate leaves.

How can Overwatered Monstera be revived?

If the monstera delicosa or adansonii has not experienced serious root rot, it may be feasible to revive it. The most crucial step is to remove excess water from the soil and allow plenty of time for your pots to dry.

If you want to restore our plant to optimal health, you may need to take into account the potential consequences of overwatering a monstera.

Here’s how to save a monstera that’s been overwatered:

Withhold watering and drain the potting soil

It’s important to wait to water your plant until you’re certain that the extra water has been drained.

At least twice a week, give your Monstera adansonii some water (depending on the climate in your area). Make sure the top layer of the potting has dried out completely before providing water to your plant (about 1-2 inches).

Check for root rot indicators

A negative effect of overwatering is root rot. Drooping leaves, a bad smell, and the sight of dark brown spots inside your plant’s roots are a few of the typical signs of root rot.

In order to stop the infection from spreading to other sections of the plant, it is essential to replace the potting soil and remove any rotting roots. To help inhibit the spread of disease, use a fungicide (and eradicate the fungi from your soil).

Make sure you stick to your watering schedule, and check on the health of your plant frequently.

Change potting medium

By altering the potting medium, you can prevent waterlogging, root rot, and other consequences of over watering. In addition, monstera are often enormous plants that may occasionally need to have their growing containers changed to allow a growth in size.

A potting mix of well-moisturized, well-drained soils with a relative pH range of 5.5-6.5 is ideal for growing monstera. Additionally, you can choose to mix pine bark fines with peat moss in a 1:4 ratio.

Selecting the best potting medium enables you to regulate temperature and water retention while also giving your plant a secure foundation.

Change the growing container

Selecting the right growth container for your monstera adansonii or delicosa is essential. When choosing a high-quality pot, you may need to take the plant’s size into account as well as drainage options and the pot’s material. The spacing on either side of a healthy growing pot should be about one and a half inches.

Before adding any potting material, always make sure your roots fit within the pot securely. While some monstera plants have aerial roots that may cling to the surface, the majority of them will fit inside the container.

Additionally, it’s a good idea to pick a pot with drainage holes so that excess water can run off. Another choice is double potting, which might be advantageous if you have growing containers that don’t fit inside your home.

How can you cheer up Monstera?

PRO HINT: Monsteras love to climb up vertical surfaces because they are climbing plants. Use pegs or moss sticks to direct your Monstera’s growth upward if you prefer it to grow tall rather than wide.

A tough and simple-to-care-for species of flowering plant native to southern Mexico and Panama called Monstera deliciosa is also known as the “Due to the distinctive growth of ridges and holes, or fenestrations, on its more mature leaves, the Swiss cheese plant is called that. The “The fruit that the plant produces in its native environment, which resembles a pineapple, gives the plant its deliciosa moniker.

A warm, humid environment with plenty of water and soft sunlight are preferred by monsteras. Put your Monstera in an area with indirect light that ranges from moderate to bright. Even though it can tolerate lower light levels, you can notice lanky growth as a result, so the optimum location is a few feet away from a window that faces the south, west, or east and provides brilliant indirect light.

We offer a guide on how to measure light in your environment if you are unclear of the lighting conditions in your house or place of business.

Only the most mature leaves of the Monstera typically develop the distinctive splits, and even so, only under optimal circumstances. Just wait if yours has plenty of light but no splits.

How long does Monstera take to perk up?

1) Remove the yellowed/blackened leaf; the damage has been done and it is now an eyesore.

2) Place the plant where you can thoroughly moisten the ground.

Pour an amount of water into the soil that is equal to its full volume, very gently.

It goes without saying that water will exit the drainage holes. You must equally moisten the entire amount of soil.

3) Position the plant directly in the center of the window, and I’m hoping you’ll leave the blinds open entirely throughout the day. The plant’s perspective of the sky is significantly limited when it is off to the side. Every plant must have the broadest vista of the sky possible (and only some plants ALSO need hours of direct sun).

After completing the aforementioned methods, your monstera plant should start to grow again if its roots are healthy. Please do that, and let me know how it goes!

How can you tell whether your Monstera is content?

How can you prevent your Monstera from drowning? We’ve discussed a little bit about how to avoid overwatering it. Once you get to know your Monstera and understand all of its behaviors, you’ll notice lots of indicators that it needs water. Some of them may not come as a surprise because the indications that a Monstera needs watering are also quite similar to those that other plants exhibit.

Your Monstera’s Soil Is Dry

The primary indication that a Monstera needs watering is dry soil. A Monstera deliciosa shouldn’t thrive in arid conditions, despite the fact that it’s vital to allow the soil dry up a little bit between waterings. Although too-dry soil won’t immediately kill a plant, it will hinder its capacity to grow effectively.

Since every plant and indoor environment is unique and can necessitate a different amount of time between waterings, routinely testing the soil will enable you to determine when your Monstera needs to be watered. Using your finger is the simplest method for doing this!

If the soil is dry after sticking your finger in it for about an inch, water the plant. Don’t water your Monstera just yet if it’s moist or still wet.

Your Monstera is Leaning Over

Although it is an unusual indicator, I have observed a leaning Monstera in my collection. An underwatered Monstera will begin to sag in a manner that causes the leaves to droop, which is similar to wilting. On a little Monstera, this is much simpler to see, although it can be seen on bigger plants as well.

Always examine the soil before watering because leaning plants might occasionally be an indication of a different problem, such as overwatering. Never add more water when the earth is damp; dry soil indicates that it is time to water.

Your Monstera should bounce back within a few days after receiving a thorough watering if the cause of drooping is too little water. As much stress as possible should be avoided allowing the Monstera to become this dry as it will stunt the plant’s growth.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Curling

Leaf curling is just another sign that a Monstera needs watering. The leaves of a Monstera that needs water will start to curl inward, making them appear smaller and less wide.

This is a temporary problem that almost always goes away with some time and some good watering! If the soil is dry, check it and give it a nice, thorough watering. Within a few days, the leaves ought to resume their regular state.

If they don’t, there might be another problem going on. Before watering once more, take some time to run a diagnostic.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Brown, Yellow, or Dead

An alarming sign may be the yellowing of your Monstera’s leaves. Dark green, waxy leaves are present on a healthy, happy Monstera (though younger plants or new leaves may be lighter green).

Some discoloration is expected because older Monstera leaves gradually turn yellow and drop off as they become older. However, you have an issue if you notice many sections of the plant with yellow, brown, or dead leaves or new leaves.

In addition to underwatering, additional issues that might cause leaf discoloration include overwatering, excessive or insufficient sunshine, or parasites. Don’t water the plant right away; instead, take the time to inspect it for any signs of these issues.

Although older growth will occasionally die off, you should take immediate action if any leaf loss is accompanied by other symptoms like drooping or discolouration. The soil’s moisture content should always be checked as the initial step. Water the soil deeply if it is dry. Look for indications that your plant may have been overwatered if the soil is wet.

Your Monstera Isn’t Putting Out Fenestrated Leaves

With adult Monsteras that haven’t started fenestrating or that produce leaves with holes in them, a lack of fenestration can become a problem. Fenestrations are nearly always a sign that the plant is not receiving enough light.

This can occasionally be brought on by inadequate sunlight. Examine the surroundings of the plant to rule that out. Monsteras require six to twelve hours a day of bright indirect sunlight. Try transplanting the plant to a brighter location if it isn’t receiving this much light.

Set a smart alarm to remind you to inspect the soil if lighting isn’t the issue and you think your Monstera needs extra water. This will assist you in forming the practice of routine plant maintenance. You can establish the ideal watering balance by making sure the soil is moist enough many times per week. Be careful not to overwater, though!