Why Is My Monstera Growing Outwards

I frequently get asked how I take care of my monstera, so I thought I’d provide some information about it here, along with affiliate links to some of the things I use and like. Using these links to make purchases helps support this blog.

Do I need to train my Monstera deliciosa?

Yes! The Monstera deliciosa grows in a manner akin to a pothos vine that just keeps getting longer. Pothos can be allowed to dangle off the side of the pot due of its smaller overall size. A few vines hanging out of the pot would swiftly fill an entire room because the monstera’s natural size is significantly larger! As a result, you should attach the vines to a reliable trellis so they may climb it.

What about using a moss pole?

The purpose of the moss pole is to offer a surface for the aerial roots to adhere to, just like they would in the natural. The only issue with attempting to do this indoors is that you have to constantly keep the moss damp. Since the air doesn’t move as much as it does outside or in a nursery, this is not advised. Mold and undesirable microorganisms thrive in stagnant air and perpetually damp environments.

A monstera’s vine can be rather heavy, even if you are successful in keeping the air clean. A single post trellis won’t be as reliable as one with multiple posts.

The Metal Trellis

Attaching my monstera vines to a strong metal trellis, such as the Panacea Garden Ladder, is how I train my plants. It is far more sturdy thanks to the triangular profile than a flat, fence-like form. Panacea Garden Plant Support Ladder, Red, from Amazon

Soft Rubber Ties

Even if wires or thread will eventually pierce the monstera vine’s strong skin, I find that this will happen. I do this by using these Soft Rubber Ties. They won’t damage the plant, are sturdy, and won’t slip after they’ve been twisted against one another. They are simple to trim to the length you require. Link to Soft Rubber Tie on Amazon (Brown) Link to Soft Rubber Tie on Amazon (Light Green)

The vines usually won’t dangle off the side of the container for a few months when your monstera is young, straight from the nursery. When provided with adequate light and moisture, those vines will appear to crawl outwards; at this point, you should secure them to a trellis.

Why is my Monstera growing more and more?

You’ve probably seen the phrase “leggy” in houseplant forums or when trying to diagnose a problem with your Monstera. Despite how frequently the phrase is used, its definition is rarely given.

A Monstera that is spread out, with scant leaves and long stems, due to inadequate availability to light, is said to be leggy. A leggy Monstera tends to reach towards any available source of light. You may have noticed this in other houseplants as many different plants have the potential to become lanky.

Why is my Monstera growing in an odd direction?

With this monstrous plant, it makes me feel as though I’m back in the rainforest! Simply adore it!

The famous Swiss Cheese plant, monstera deliciosa, is undoubtedly impressive. It will repay you with this incredible jungly home atmosphere if you provide it with the necessary circumstances and space to flourish. And after a long day, who wouldn’t want to retreat to the jungle? I do, without a doubt! Take a mojito, relax under your monstera, turn on some jungle music, and there you have it!

The gorgeous cut leaf forms are so captivating they make you feel as though you are in the tropics. These gorgeous plants, which are native to the jungles of Central America, add a wow element to your house. These plants have a maximum height of 60 feet in the wild. I am aware of its size. After noticing my monstera’s growth spike this year and having just replanted it, I can already tell that if she continues to grow at this rate, I’ll need a larger apartment.

I have had numerous inquiries regarding these stunning plants, so I decided to compile some informative Monstera FAQs, suggestions, and tips to share with you. You might be shocked to learn that these plants are actually considered “easy maintenance” and that caring for them can be highly satisfying:

When do I need to repot my Swiss Cheese plant?

The growth spurt has occurred and is now in full force! In just six months, a monstera plant can almost completely fill a planter with its thick tuberous root system. Ideally, you should repot your monstera once a year in the spring or summer. It’s time to repot your monstera if you pull up the pot and notice that the roots are sticking out the bottom through the drainage holes. Use a well-draining houseplant soil mix for repotting these plants, and be careful not to increase the pot size too much. To improve aeration and drainage, I added pearlite to mine.

What are the crazy roots coming from the stem of my Monstera Deliciosa plant?

These are the aerial roots of the monstera deliciosa. This plant makes a great climber in its natural environment. In its jungle habitat, these aerial roots shoot out in search of objects to cling to and climb on. For this reason, while your monstera is maturing, I usually advise adding a moss stick. This will provide it with support and a point of stability. In the absence of this, there is a possibility that your plant will begin to grow horizontally along the floor while its aerial roots look for something to climb.

Can I propagate my Swiss Cheese plant?

You very certainly can. Create some tiny plants to gift to friends and relatives if you notice that it keeps expanding and blocking your room.

Choose a monstera vine that is at least 12 inches long, mature, and has two or more nodes. To reduce the chance of bacteria and illness, make a clean cut, making sure it’s below a node. Put the leaves above the waterline and submerge the stem and one of the nodes in lukewarm water. Root growth will result from this. Keep in mind to change the water every week. When the roots are at least 4 inches long, the same houseplant compost mix as the mother plant should be used. A cane can be inserted for additional support. Then take a seat, unwind, and watch your baby monstera develop. Good fortune!

Signs to watch out for:

  • Do you notice a lot of unusually long aerial roots and slower-than-normal leaf growth? This could indicate that your plant needs to be repotted because its roots are confined.
  • The plant’s lower leaves are turning yellow. The stem may be becoming dark or black at the base and is wilting. This could indicate that the light is too dim and the soil is becoming permanently saturated. This may result in plant death and root rot. Examine the roots of the plant by removing it from the pot. Everything is fine if they are white-tinged and appear strong and robust. You must take action quickly if they are mushy and brown. Remove all of the afflicted roots while being careful not to damage the healthy ones with a clean pair of scissors. Repot in a fresh container with dry soil. Change to a brighter spot and modify your watering schedule as necessary.
  • brown edges and a sharp curl to the leaves. This is a clear indication of dehydration and excessive sun exposure. In particular during the midday, monstera plants like bright indirect light away from direct sunshine.
  • When you notice a little buildup, frequently dust the enormous, lovely monstera leaves. This dust may obstruct a plant’s pores, preventing it from soaking up the sun’s beneficial rays for healthy growth. All you need is a clean, moist towel to give it a quick once-over every week or two if you notice dust building up.
  • Is the area where you have your Monstera Deliciosa darker than you would like? If you have no other place to put it and you find the soil is taking a while to dry out, you might try poking the dirt with a pair of chopsticks (just the top half). This replicates how worms and other invertebrates would normally carry out this function in the nature by introducing some oxygen. In the event that you see the soil isn’t drying out too rapidly, you can do this around once a month.
  • On the top soil of my Monstera Deliciosa plant, I discovered mold. Try moving it to a brighter place and reducing the watering frequency, ensuring sure the top few inches of soil are drying out between waterings. This is usually a sign of too much water and not enough light.

I sincerely hope that this information is useful, but please feel free to contact me with any additional inquiries. Enjoy taking care of this wonderful plant.

Look at the Monstera Monkey Leaf plant and Monstera Minima if you want something a little bit smaller but with the same beauty as a Monstera Deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) (both seen below). They are related to the Swiss Cheese Plant and have leaves that are famous for having been slashed, although they are considerably more fragile than their larger cousin.

How can I make my Monstera grow in a straight line?

Monsteras are climbing plants, therefore unlike most plants, they have not developed to support their own weight with their stems. They develop massive, enormous leaves to absorb as much sunlight as they can in the dense rainforest.

The Monstera needs longer, stronger stems to maintain itself, but this requires energy. As a result, it leverages the strength of other plants to lift itself up by grabbing onto neighboring surfaces with its aerial roots.

These wiggling protrusions from the plant’s stems, which can reach lengths of three feet, are called roots. They will cling themselves to any adjacent surface that is sturdy enough to hold the plant and latch onto it to keep it standing.

Because of its growth strategy, your Monstera requires support. There won’t be any trees nearby to climb, but it needs something to support itself, so consider what kind of support you can offer. Typically, folks will use a moss stick or a stake.

However, there are a variety of support systems you can provide, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Let’s examine a few possibilities.

Option One) A Garden Stake

The easiest and most affordable solution is frequently a plain garden stake. Simply insert a sturdy stake into the ground, then allow your Monstera to use it to climb.

To help the plant to grow straight, place it close to the center of the pot. The plant will begin to grow in that direction if a stake is only placed at one edge because that is where it is getting support. It becomes out of equilibrium as a result, which causes the issues mentioned above.

If your Monstera is already overgrown, adding stakes is a smart option because it makes it simple to gently nudge the stems back toward the middle of the pot, and you can add more than one stake if necessary. They are also portable, so you can move them about to support the plant wherever it needs it and add or remove stakes as necessary.

Stakes are more more versatile than the more intricate support systems, but they aren’t the most attractive choice. You might want to think about other options if they are ruining your Monstera’s appearance.

Option Two) A Trellis

A trellis might be a nice alternative for people who have small plants that are just starting to need support. These are quite secure and will guarantee that your plant maintains its training in one place.

Pick a trellis that can support your Monstera. Keep in mind that these plants can reach heights of up to 10 feet indoors (or even higher), which is a tremendous amount of weight for one trellis to hold.

The plant will be supported by a trellis that has numerous poles because these are typically more stronger. Additionally, they provide the plant with multiple locations to adhere to rather than just one or two, allowing it to spread out and develop thickly.

However, due to the inflexible shape, training your Monstera onto a trellis would be quite challenging if it is already half-grown or fully-grown. A trellis is rigid and cannot be rearranged to accommodate the contour of your plant. Only young Monstera plants can benefit from these.

Option Three) A Moss Stick

Moss sticks may be slightly more expensive than other options because they have been specifically created to support Monstera plants and other climbing plants. They do, however, have a number of important advantages.

Although the material of the poles varies, they are all covered in sphagnum moss to give the Monstera a surface that is comparable to one it would find in the wild.

The Monstera can root in the damp, organic material because most trees have moss and lichen growing on their bark, which may help to keep your plant happy. The moss has a lot of texture, which makes it easier for your plant to grasp and keeps it from falling.

The plant will also receive water and micronutrients from the moss, which it will take through its aerial roots. Your plant’s health is improved as a result.

The aesthetic is the next significant benefit. The sticks seem very much in keeping with the natural sense of the plant because they are covered in moss, and they will fit in well. The moss pole extends the natural beauty, whereas a trellis or pegs can ruin it.

Any moss stick you purchase must be sturdy enough to hold up your Monstera as it grows. For your plant to have several support points, think about adding more than one.

Some claim that utilizing moss sticks encourages better leaf growth and keeps Monstera healthy.

Option Four) A Coco Coir Pole

This is made to assist climbing plants, much like the moss stick. It provides support to keep your Monstera upright while also storing moisture and nutrients that the plant can use as food.

Try a coco coir pole if you don’t like the way a moss stick looks; they both have the same function and will keep your plant happy and healthy. You are free to combine the two if you’d like!

Why is my Monstera spreading rather than growing up?

The tropical vine Monstera deliciosa is renowned for its aggressive, quick growth. While they won’t grow as tall when kept inside, Monsteras can produce a lot of growth quickly. In the wild, they can easily reach heights of up to 60 feet. It’s time to look into your Monstera if you’ve discovered that it isn’t growing at all. There might be a problem.

There are various reasons why a Monstera will cease developing. The most frequent causes are poor lighting, an excess or shortage of water, pests, roots that are attached to pots, and a lack of nutrients. Fortunately, most of these issues are simple to resolve, and a Monstera that has experienced any of these problems typically recovers fast.

A pause in growth, regardless of the reason, can make a houseplant owner feel a little anxious. But don’t worry, you can solve the majority of problems in a few easy steps. In this article, I’ll discuss some of the major problems that can impede a Monstera from growing and what you can do to fix them.