Why Are My Monstera Leaves Turning Brown

Yellow leaves can also signify a variety of things. You’re probably overwatering your monstera if the leaves are turning yellow. Make sure your plant receives lots of indirect sunshine so the top few inches of soil may dry out quickly before watering.

Considering that your monstera may also be lacking in nutrients, this is an excellent moment to start using a liquid fertilizer in your usual care. Because Monstera Plant Food is made to be used with every watering, you won’t need to keep track of a fertilization schedule, which is why we adore it!

Dark brown spots on monstera leaves is a good indication of the plant getting too much water.

If your monstera plant has dark brown stains on its leaves, it may be because of overwatering, which is rotting the roots. (Read 4 Signs Your Monstera Is Over-Watered for additional information.)

Trim off any roots that appear mushy or brown with clean, sharp pruning scissors after carefully removing the plant from the pot. Repot the plant into a clean container (either a new one or the old one that you’ve cleaned out) with fresh, dry soil after removing as much of the old, damp dirt from the root ball as you can.

Make sure your monstera receives enough of light, and reduce watering while the plant is healing. You can also remove the damaged leaves with pruning.

Make sure the soil feels dry before watering to prevent root rot, and think about obtaining a moisture meter like this one to check the moisture content of the root ball before watering.

Light brown spots and crispy edges on monstera leaves means the monstera needs more water.

Your monstera plant may be thirsty if the edges become a light brown color and become “crispy.” Give the earth a drink and think about watering a little more frequently if it feels dry. The dead edges can be removed because they won’t recover.

Additionally, avoid placing your monstera in direct sunlight as this might burn the leaves! Move your monstera a little further into the space or to a better location altogether if you observe the sunshine directly striking your leaves.

A drooping monstera can mean it needs more water or more light.

Another symptom that could imply a variety of things is drooping monstera leaves. Your monstera may be overwatered or underwatered in this situation.

Look at the earth to determine which it is! It’s likely that your plant needs water if the soil seems dry. Give your plant a chance to dry out if it feels moist before watering it once more. Make sure it receives plenty of indirect sunshine so it can successfully do this. Consider repotting into a pot with greater drainage and a faster-draining soil if you notice your soil remains wet for an extended period of time.

Your monstera might need additional light if the soil looks to be healthy and watering doesn’t seem to be the problem. (Read 4 Signs Your Monstera Needs More Light for more information.)

Read our instructions on watering your monstera here. Watering is typically the most challenging aspect of taking care of any plant.

Why are the leaves on my Monstera brown?

Swiss cheese plants, often referred to as monstera plants, have gained a lot of popularity in recent years, and we can see why.

Swiss cheese plants, often referred to as monstera plants, have gained a lot of popularity in recent years, and we can see why. They immediately become the center of a room due to their distinctive split leaves.

However, you might notice that your Monstera’s leaves start to turn brown if it isn’t in its ideal optical environment. The main causes of browning Monstera leaves include over- or underwatering, excessive exposure to sunlight, dry air, or nutrient deficiency.

Should you remove the Monstera’s brown leaves?

Your Monstera should have any damaged leaves removed. Trimming dead leaves helps your plant’s health in addition to improving its appearance.

  • Unable to photosynthesize are dead leaves. Any brown or black areas on your Monstera’s leaves are no longer able to supply the plant with energy.
  • Dead leaf sections have no protection against rot and infection in comparison to healthy leaves. Dead plant cells provide nutrients that are consumed by bacteria and fungi. For instance, you can notice mold growing on dead leaves that have been left on the plant or in the soil. To help defend the remainder of the plant against these diseases, remove any dark or damaged tissue.

It is possible that only the ripped edge of a leaf will become brown to seal a cut if there is only very minimal damage, such as accidently ripping or torn a portion of the leaf. Leave minor imperfections alone if they don’t affect other parts of the plant or interfere with your pleasure of the plant’s aesthetics.

Monstera damage to the roots and stems can be more serious than damage to the leaves because it prevents the plant from transporting water and nutrients. Visit our soon-to-be-available guides on stem damage and root rot.

With brown foliage, how can Monstera be saved?

  • Trim all of the dead, browned leaves from the area close to the base of your Monstera Deliciosa. The discolored edges need to be pruned since they cannot recover or turn green.
  • After ensuring that the soil is dry, water your plant. I would also advise giving your plant a little more frequent waterings.
  • The potting mix, light, temperature, pot size, and type all affect how much water your plant requires or how quickly the soil dries. Consider how dry the soil should be before watering it rather than how frequently you should apply water.
  • If you have any reason to believe your Monstera Deliciosa has been overwatered, you should check the soil right once. Repot your plant in a new potting soil combination if necessary.
  • When cultivated outside, the scorching sunlight causes the leaves to burn and turn brown. Move your plant to a location with filtered sunlight if it is currently exposed to direct sunshine.

How frequently should Monstera be watered?

Monstera deliciosa and Monstera adansonii are the two varieties of Monstera that are grown as indoor plants. In addition to having entirely enclosed leaf holes, Monstera adansonii differs from M. deliciosa by having longer, tapering leaves. Leaf holes on Monstera deliciosa eventually mature, move toward the edge, and then open up.

Though they hardly ever flower or produce edible fruit inside, they are one of the few aroids that produce edible fruit, especially Monstera deliciosa, which is a member of the Araceae, the Aroid Family. Although the indigenous peoples of Central America had been familiar with monsteras for a very long time, the botanical community only became publicly aware of them in the early 20th century, like many aroids.

thrives in direct light that is bright to medium. Although it cannot tolerate strong, direct sunlight, it can become accustomed to it.

Water every one to two weeks, letting the soil dry out in between applications. In brighter light, water more frequently, and in less-bright light, less frequently. Pro tip: Water that has been filtered or set out overnight before use is beneficial for monsteras.

Although normal room humidity will do, humid circumstances are preferred. Use a fine-mist mister or humidifier to increase the humidity level in the room.

Most houseplants enjoy temperatures between 65F and 85F. (18C-30C). It’s ideal to keep the temperature above 60F. (15C).

Use a potting mix that drains effectively. As needed, include elements like perlite or lava rocks to improve soil aeration.

The Monstera is a calm and often pest-free plant. Treat pests as soon as they show up by wiping down the plant frequently and weekly applications of a natural insecticide like neem oil.

SYMPTOM: Edges of leaves that are turning brown and crunchy. CAUSE: Overwatered, thirsty, or high salt buildup

How can overwatered monstera be fixed?

If the monstera delicosa or adansonii has not experienced serious root rot, it may be feasible to revive it. The most crucial step is to remove excess water from the soil and allow plenty of time for your pots to dry.

If you want to restore our plant to optimal health, you may need to take into account the potential consequences of overwatering a monstera.

Here’s how to save a monstera that’s been overwatered:

Withhold watering and drain the potting soil

It’s important to wait to water your plant until you’re certain that the extra water has been drained.

At least twice a week, give your Monstera adansonii some water (depending on the climate in your area). Make sure the top layer of the potting has dried out completely before providing water to your plant (about 1-2 inches).

Check for root rot indicators

A negative effect of overwatering is root rot. Drooping leaves, a bad smell, and the sight of dark brown spots inside your plant’s roots are a few of the typical signs of root rot.

In order to stop the infection from spreading to other sections of the plant, it is essential to replace the potting soil and remove any rotting roots. To help inhibit the spread of disease, use a fungicide (and eradicate the fungi from your soil).

Make sure you stick to your watering schedule, and check on the health of your plant frequently.

Change potting medium

By altering the potting medium, you can prevent waterlogging, root rot, and other consequences of over watering. In addition, monstera are often enormous plants that may occasionally need to have their growing containers changed to allow a growth in size.

A potting mix of well-moisturized, well-drained soils with a relative pH range of 5.5-6.5 is ideal for growing monstera. Additionally, you can choose to mix pine bark fines with peat moss in a 1:4 ratio.

Selecting the best potting medium enables you to regulate temperature and water retention while also giving your plant a secure foundation.

Change the growing container

Selecting the right growth container for your monstera adansonii or delicosa is essential. When choosing a high-quality pot, you may need to take the plant’s size into account as well as drainage options and the pot’s material. The spacing on either side of a healthy growing pot should be about one and a half inches.

Before adding any potting material, always make sure your roots fit within the pot securely. While some monstera plants have aerial roots that may cling to the surface, the majority of them will fit inside the container.

Additionally, it’s a good idea to pick a pot with drainage holes so that excess water can run off. Another choice is double potting, which might be advantageous if you have growing containers that don’t fit inside your home.

Why are the leaves on my Monstera becoming brown and yellow?

Inappropriate soil moisture, particularly overwatering, is the most frequent cause of yellowing leaves in Monsteras. Whenever the top 2-3 inches of soil are dry, water your Monstera only then. The soil must be kept moist but not drenched. You can wait a little bit longer between waterings during the winter.

When watering, be sure to use enough water so that liquid runs into the saucer from the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot. It’s crucial to remove any extra water from the saucer since your Monstera won’t do well with “wet feet,” which leads to the rot of the roots and the eventual death of the plant.

In order to properly and consistently care for a Monstera, the soil must be adequately hydrated. Your Monstera may become stressed and become yellow if it alternates between incredibly dry and wet soil as a result of inefficient watering.

Low humidity and dry soil lead leaves to first turn brown on the edges before eventually turning completely yellow. The humidity will rise if you mist your Monstera plant’s leaves frequently.

In general, Monsteras do well in indirect light that ranges from low to bright. The foliage will burn if exposed to direct sunlight for an extended period of time. Monsteras can tolerate low light levels, although their growth will be slower. Yellowing leaves can be a sign of insufficient light. Move in accordance with the amount of light that your Monstera is receiving.

Monstera that are stressed or weaker are more prone to bug infestations. Spider mites and other sap-sucking insects can dehydrate your plant. Leaflets and fronds quickly start to yellow as a result of this issue. In an interior environment, scale, mealybugs, and spider mites are usually present. These tiny pests multiply and travel into nooks and crannies along frond portions if they are not eliminated at an early stage. The insects’ piercing jaws fatigue your plant and hasten yellowing, particularly if your Monstera is already unwell due to inadequate lighting, nutrient inadequacy, or insufficient soil moisture.

Are you seeing fresh growth on your Monstera? This yellowing is normal if your plant is experiencing new development and the yellowing leaves are older, especially near the base of the plant. Old leaves on your plant are shed, and new growth is energized.