When To Stake Monstera

This is more of a moment for you to evaluate the situation and make decisions about how to direct your Monstera’s growth going ahead than it is a sign from the plant. If you are repotting your Monstera, this is the ideal moment to incorporate a moss pole.

Typically, Monsteras need to be replanted every one to two years into a container that is one size bigger than the one they were in before. But now is the moment to transfer it to a larger pot if you see that you need to water it regularly or that the roots are sprouting out of the drainage holes.

Even if you aren’t presently exhibiting the aforementioned symptoms, I would advise you to add a moss pole when you are repotting your Monstera. Because you can see the roots and avoid severing them when securing the pole in the soil, adding a moss pole to a fresh pot is considerably simpler.

Do I need to stake my Monstera?

There are several advantages to supporting your Monstera’s posture with a stake or moss poll. As epiphytes, or plants that grow vertically in nature by climbing on the other plants surrounding them, Monsteras do so in their natural habitats. Yes, they survive with a little assistance from their friends.

When your Monstera is housed in a pot, it can be more difficult to adapt this epiphytic tendency, but stakes are the ideal “dupe” for other plants. Your Monstera will maintain a beautiful posture that maintains them looking their best by clinging to its stake, reaching upward, and holding its heaviest stems straight. Aerial roots are a favorite feature of monsteras; avoid cutting them! These roots are designed to support the bulky base of your plant, but staking the plant helps to lighten their burden, allowing you to tuck them into the soil of your Monstera and let them rest invisibly.

When should I plant Monstera with a moss pole?

Some nurseries, garden centers, and specialized plant shops sell moss poles, or you can create your own at home. By inserting the moss pole into the soil at the plant’s stem’s base, you can add a moss pole to the container holding your monstera. Put enough downward pressure on it so that the dirt holds it in place. Keep in mind that eventually it will be bearing the weight of the monstera! The monstera stem should be attached to the moss pole using twist ties, string, or zip ties such that the plant’s aerial roots or nodes are in touch with the moss. Monstera needs to be manually fastened to the pole until its aerial roots start to grow into the moss as it matures. Anytime is a good time to add a moss pole to your monstera’s pot, but if you want to start out ahead of the game, do it when the plant is young and has only recently started to develop aerial roots.

How do I get my Monstera to start climbing?

One of the benefits of growing Monstera deliciosa inside for fans is its capacity to develop into a substantial cornerstone for a jungle-themed home. However, that expansion also creates some issues because a Monstera can quickly outgrow its allotted space. Large Monsteras typically grow outward, unlike other common houseplants with an upward, tree-like growth pattern (such the fiddle-leaf fig or rubber plant). Because of this, many people prefer their Monstera deliciosa to climb rather than trail.

How can I encourage Monstera deliciosa to climb? You can encourage your Monstera deliciosa to grow upright by providing a support system, such as a moss pole, coco coir pole, or trellis. This teaches the plant to follow its innate tendency to climb, which may result in a healthier plant with more leaves.

The good news is that Monsteras are designed for ascent. You can get this plant off the ground and out of the way if the correct circumstances and some encouragement are there. I’ll go through some specifics regarding how and why Monsteras are frequently observed climbing on moss poles throughout this article and provide you with advice on teaching this plant to climb.

What causes my Monstera to topple over?

Due mostly to its spectacular leaves, the Monstera deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) is a common houseplant. Although they are simple to care for, these fellas do have one drawback: if they feel neglected, they have a tendency to pout, which may cause your Monstera leaves to droop. Don’t panic too much. They can quickly be persuaded to recover with a little loving attention.

The most frequent cause of drooping monstera leaves is dehydration. They prefer their soil to always be just moist enough. Other contributing factors include overwatering, poor lighting, issues with fertilizer, pests, or transplant stress. The most crucial step in restoring your plant to health is figuring out what the issue is.

How can I keep my Monstera standing straight?

Right now, Monstera Deliciosa is a stylish and well-liked houseplant, and it’s simple to understand why. The room’s broad, glossy, dark-green leaves have a tropical feel to it, and under the correct circumstances, they develop swiftly. In fact, this plant’s potential for growing too large for some homes is one of its only drawbacks. When a Monstera grows large, it often tips over or leans to one side.

How can a Monstera Deliciosa be kept from leaning over? Staking a Monstera Deliciosa with a support like a moss pole, trellis, or garden stakes is the best way to keep it growing upright. These natural climbers can be trained to climb these poles by being connected to them, and they will be supported as they do so.

Although a Monstera won’t be harmed by not growing upright, most people like them to be as straight and tall as possible for aesthetic and spatial reasons. To help you keep your Monstera looking the way you want it to, I’ll go into further depth below why why this occurs in the first place.

Why is my Monstera growing in an odd direction?

With this monstrous plant, it makes me feel as though I’m back in the rainforest! Simply adore it!

The famous Swiss Cheese plant, monstera deliciosa, is undoubtedly impressive. It will repay you with this incredible jungly home atmosphere if you provide it with the necessary circumstances and space to flourish. And after a long day, who wouldn’t want to retreat to the jungle? I do, without a doubt! Take a mojito, relax under your monstera, turn on some jungle music, and there you have it!

The gorgeous cut leaf forms are so captivating they make you feel as though you are in the tropics. These gorgeous plants, which are native to the jungles of Central America, add a wow element to your house. These plants have a maximum height of 60 feet in the wild. I am aware of its size. After noticing my monstera’s growth spike this year and having just replanted it, I can already tell that if she continues to grow at this rate, I’ll need a larger apartment.

I have had numerous inquiries regarding these stunning plants, so I decided to compile some informative Monstera FAQs, suggestions, and tips to share with you. You might be shocked to learn that these plants are actually considered “easy maintenance” and that caring for them can be highly satisfying:

When do I need to repot my Swiss Cheese plant?

The growth spurt has occurred and is now in full force! In just six months, a monstera plant can almost completely fill a planter with its thick tuberous root system. Ideally, you should repot your monstera once a year in the spring or summer. It’s time to repot your monstera if you pull up the pot and notice that the roots are sticking out the bottom through the drainage holes. Use a well-draining houseplant soil mix for repotting these plants, and be careful not to increase the pot size too much. To improve aeration and drainage, I added pearlite to mine.

What are the crazy roots coming from the stem of my Monstera Deliciosa plant?

These are the aerial roots of the monstera deliciosa. This plant makes a great climber in its natural environment. In its jungle habitat, these aerial roots shoot out in search of objects to cling to and climb on. For this reason, while your monstera is maturing, I usually advise adding a moss stick. This will provide it with support and a point of stability. In the absence of this, there is a possibility that your plant will begin to grow horizontally along the floor while its aerial roots look for something to climb.

Can I propagate my Swiss Cheese plant?

You very certainly can. Create some tiny plants to gift to friends and relatives if you notice that it keeps expanding and blocking your room.

Choose a monstera vine that is at least 12 inches long, mature, and has two or more nodes. To reduce the chance of bacteria and illness, make a clean cut, making sure it’s below a node. Put the leaves above the waterline and submerge the stem and one of the nodes in lukewarm water. Root growth will result from this. Keep in mind to change the water every week. When the roots are at least 4 inches long, the same houseplant compost mix as the mother plant should be used. A cane can be inserted for additional support. Then take a seat, unwind, and watch your baby monstera develop. Good fortune!

Signs to watch out for:

  • Do you notice a lot of unusually long aerial roots and slower-than-normal leaf growth? This could indicate that your plant needs to be repotted because its roots are confined.
  • The plant’s lower leaves are turning yellow. The stem may be becoming dark or black at the base and is wilting. This could indicate that the light is too dim and the soil is becoming permanently saturated. This may result in plant death and root rot. Examine the roots of the plant by removing it from the pot. Everything is fine if they are white-tinged and appear strong and robust. You must take action quickly if they are mushy and brown. Remove all of the afflicted roots while being careful not to damage the healthy ones with a clean pair of scissors. Repot in a fresh container with dry soil. Change to a brighter spot and modify your watering schedule as necessary.
  • brown edges and a sharp curl to the leaves. This is a clear indication of dehydration and excessive sun exposure. In particular during the midday, monstera plants like bright indirect light away from direct sunshine.
  • When you notice a little buildup, frequently dust the enormous, lovely monstera leaves. This dust may obstruct a plant’s pores, preventing it from soaking up the sun’s beneficial rays for healthy growth. All you need is a clean, moist towel to give it a quick once-over every week or two if you notice dust building up.
  • Is the area where you have your Monstera Deliciosa darker than you would like? If you have no other place to put it and you find the soil is taking a while to dry out, you might try poking the dirt with a pair of chopsticks (just the top half). This replicates how worms and other invertebrates would normally carry out this function in the nature by introducing some oxygen. In the event that you see the soil isn’t drying out too rapidly, you can do this around once a month.
  • On the top soil of my Monstera Deliciosa plant, I discovered mold. Try moving it to a brighter place and reducing the watering frequency, ensuring sure the top few inches of soil are drying out between waterings. This is usually a sign of too much water and not enough light.

I sincerely hope that this information is useful, but please feel free to contact me with any additional inquiries. Enjoy taking care of this wonderful plant.

Look at the Monstera Monkey Leaf plant and Monstera Minima if you want something a little bit smaller but with the same beauty as a Monstera Deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) (both seen below). They are related to the Swiss Cheese Plant and have leaves that are famous for having been slashed, although they are considerably more fragile than their larger cousin.

Does my Swiss cheese plant need to be staked?

Low upkeep is required when caring for monstera plants. The interior of the plant must be at least 65 °F (18 °C) heated, preferably higher. Swiss cheese plants also require a lot of humidity and somewhat moist soil. A wooden or moss-covered pole placed in the center of the pot will offer the additional support that the aerial roots require.

Every year when the plant is young, repotting cheese plants is done to promote development and aerate the soil. Increase the size of your containers until you reach the biggest pot you intend to use. After then, the plant need a fresh top-dress of rich soil every year but can survive being root-bound for a number of years at a time.

Repotting Monstera is best done in the early spring before the plant develops new leaves.

Are Monsteras misted?

Monstera Deliciosas may tolerate low to high levels of indirect, dappled light. Their leaves may burn and scorch if exposed to direct sunlight for an extended period of time. Low light conditions will inhibit growth.

Make sure your Variegated Monstera Deliciosa gets enough of bright indirect light if you have one.

Water

You should spritz your Monstera Deliciosa frequently and water it once a week. In the winter, when you may only need to water your plant every two weeks, let the soil dry up in between waterings.

Humidity

Because Monstera Deliciosa prefers a humid atmosphere, we advise often wetting its leaves. To boost the humidity of the air around your plant, you might also place it close to other plants.

Additional care information

From a stem and leaf cutting, you may quickly reproduce your monstera deliciosa in water. Make sure to make the cut just below a stem node.

The Monstera Deliciosa’s huge leaves are readily covered in dust over time. Use a moist towel to routinely wipe them.

Troubleshooting

Yellowing leaves may indicate that your Monstera Deliciosa has experienced moisture shock or has received too much light.

Browning leaves are a sign that your plant has been receiving insufficient light or has been exposed to low humidity.