When To Fertilize Monstera

This houseplant requires basic dietary requirements in order to grow healthy, lush leaves. It should be treated regularly with a balanced houseplant fertilizer, such as one with an NPK ratio of 6-12-6, to encourage deep leaf color and robust development during its fast-growing seasons (spring and summer).

Consider utilizing a continuous feeding solution, such as Miracle-Indoor Gro’s Plant Spikes, which will dissolve gradually over two months, for less frequent fertilizing (available from Amazon). Larger Monstera plants need more fertilizer than smaller ones, so be sure to use any fertilizer according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Which fertilizer is ideal for Monstera?

The top four fertilizers for Monstera are as follows:

  • Indoor Miracle-Gro Plant Food (Liquid)
  • Bonide 10-10-10 Soil Fertilizer, Liquid Plant Food
  • Organic-based premium concentrated house plant food from Joyful Dirt.
  • All-purpose indoor plant fertilizer and Easy Peasy liquid indoor plant food.

Is winter a good time to fertilize Monstera?

Almost area in your house is a good place to plant Monstera! It can withstand low light, but develops more quickly and dramatically in an area with bright indirect light. Having said that, stay out of direct, bright sunlight as it could burn the foliage. Use a grow lamp if you don’t have access to an area with the right illumination for your Monstera.

When the top 5075 percent of the soil is dry, water your Monstera. Pour water into the pot until it begins to drain through the drainage hole at the bottom, then drain any excess water into the saucer.

Almost any atmosphere will be favorable for this plant, but if you want to give it a particular treat, spritz it once a week with a Mister. The water will have plenty of time to evaporate before dark if you spritz your Monstera in the morning.

The ideal temperature range for your Monstera is between 60 and 80 degrees. Under 55 degrees or sharp decreases in temperature are intolerable to it. In the winter, stay away from direct heater airflow and cold drafts.

Feed your plant once a month in the spring and summer for best results, using our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20). To promote growth and root health, a little food will go a long way. Giving your Monstera a chance to relax during the cooler months of the year is vital since fertilizer is not required throughout the winter.

Both humans and animals are slightly poisonous to monstera leaves. Ingestion frequently results in tongue and stomach discomfort, as well as potential vomiting.

Massive leaves may attract dust. To maintain the leaves clean and healthy, use microfiber dusting gloves to wipe them down whenever you see that they are dusty or soiled. Monstera plants like to climb in the wild. You can use a moss pole or a dowel to stake wild offshoots of your Monstera in order to encourage it to grow upward. Make careful to use clean, sharp Plant Snips while trimming your Monstera.

When should my cheese plant be fed?

Finding the ideal location for your Swiss cheese plant is crucial. The leaves will scorch under too much direct sunlight. If there is too much shade, the leaves won’t pierce. The best location is near a window in good lighting and is only a few feet away. Avoid placing it close to a radiator or an air conditioner. Give it plenty of space because it will become extremely big.

Swiss cheese plants can survive in temperatures as low as 10C but will only thrive in temps over 18C.

How to plant a Swiss cheese plant

Plant in a large, drainage-holed pot with peat-free, all-purpose, or house plant compost inside of it. Around the root ball, there should be at least 1 inch of compost.

Caring for a Swiss cheese plant

Swiss cheese plants require little maintenance. The time of year and the environment in the space will determine how frequently you should water your Swiss cheese plant. Instead of watering according to a schedule, water anytime the compost’s top inch or two are dry. Make sure to let all of the water run off after that. Wintertime plants require less watering, especially if they are kept in a cool environment. In the spring and summer, give the plant a monthly feeding with a house plant food.

The stems of the plant must be tied into a support, such as a moss or coir pole, as it develops and becomes floppy. These are available online or in garden centers.

Aerial roots, which are long, white roots that emerge from the plant’s stems, will also develop on the plant. These aid the plant in clinging to trees in the wild. Trimming the aerial roots off if you find them unsightly is OK because your plant will be obtaining its nutrition from the roots in the compost. To support the plant, you can also tuck them into the compost or let them climb the moss pole.

If the roots are starting to protrude from the pot, repot in the spring using plant compost or all-purpose compost. Scoop up as much of the compost from the top of the pot as you can and replace it with fresh material if the plant grows too large for you to handle it comfortably.

To keep them looking glossy and to aid in the plant’s ability to breathe, occasionally wipe the large leaves with a damp cloth. Your plant will benefit from a sprinkling of its leaves if it is in a warm environment.

How to propagate a Swiss cheese plant

Taking cuttings from a Swiss cheese plant is simple. Choose a stem in the spring or early summer that has an aerial root starting to grow further down. Look for a white or brown bud next to a leaf. This will serve as the new roots. Make a cut that is about an inch below the aerial root with a sharp knife or secateurs. Check to make sure the aerial root is immersed before placing the stem in a clear, deep container with a few inches of water. Place in a well-lit area away from the sun and replace the water every few days. Within a week or two, new roots should begin to emerge. The cutting should have developed a respectable bundle of new roots that are about four inches long after about six weeks. You can now put the new plant in a pot filled with fresh, all-purpose, or house plant compost. water, allowing any extra to drain.

Growing Swiss cheese plants: problem-solving

If the leaves on your Swiss cheese plant aren’t perforating, they might still be young; it’s common for a plant to have both cut and uncut leaves. Move to a brighter area if the larger leaves are not perforating because of a lack of light.

You have overwatered your Swiss cheese plant and the compost is too wet if it is “weeping” or has “tears” of water at the borders of its leaves. Water only when the soil starts to dry out, and allow any extra water drain away. Make sure the compost is just damp, not sopping wet.

Yellow leaves may indicate overwatering, particularly if they are also wilting. It might also indicate that the plant needs to be fed.

Brown blotches on the leaves are probably the result of sunburn. Remove the plant from the sun’s direct rays.

Wilting leaves may indicate either inadequate or excessive irrigation. The plant needs water if the compost is starting to dry out. If it is soaked, you overwatered; let the soil air-dry. It may also indicate that the plant’s roots are becoming clogged and unable to absorb water. It’s time to plant it into a larger container if roots start to protrude from the bottom of the current one.

The simplest technique to fix a plant that has grown too large or out of shape is to prune it by removing some stems from the base. Because the sap may be harmful, wear gloves. Take a clipping or two instead, and give the original plant to someone with more room in their house.

Mealybugs might cause issues.

Watch out for insects on the undersides of leaves that resemble white, fluffy blobs. Use a cotton bud or moist towel dipped in a pesticide containing fatty acids or plant oils to wipe them off. Keep inspecting the leaves since mealybugs can be challenging to get rid of.

Scale insects, which are tiny, 6mm long, brown sap sucking insects, may also be seen. Remove using a cotton bud or piece of cloth dipped in a pesticide with fatty acids.

How much fertilizer is required for a Monstera?

You need a fertilizer with the proper mineral content for the specific plant you are feeding in order to produce good, high-quality fertilizer. The three most crucial ones are potassium, phosphorus, and nitrogen.

While these three elements are required in the greatest amounts, additional ingredients are equally crucial but in smaller amounts. Magnesium, calcium, and sulfur are a few of these.

On a container, the major three are frequently shown as the N-P-K ratio (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in that respected order). Typically, this ratio will be written as a trio of digits, like 10-12-14. In this case, the fertilizer’s composition would be 10% nitrogen, 12% phosphorus, and 14% potassium. All the secondary minerals would make up the remaining 64% in lower amounts.

All plants require these necessary minerals, although individual plants will need varying ratios in order to maintain optimal health. Typically, a 20-20-20 liquid fertilizer is going to be the ideal for a full foliage type plant like the Monstera to reach optimum health. This harmonious combination of the primary three promotes robust, healthy growth.

A higher phosphorus level fertilizer ratio of 15-30-15 may promote blooming in outdoor plants, even though Monsteras Deliciosas rarely yield any fruit indoors.

How is fertilizer administered to Monstera?

You are aware that your Monstera most likely requires fertilizer, but how much do you apply? What variety do you have? Here is all the information you require for fertilizing your Monstera.

During the spring and summer growing seasons, fertilize your Monstera using a balanced fertilizer. During the fall and winter, when your Monstera’s growth slows for the season, reduce or cease fertilizing. Every 24 weeks, fertilize your Monstera with either liquid or granular fertilizer.

If you’re interested in finding out more about how to choose the best fertilizer for your Swiss cheese plant, read on. I’ll also talk about the macro- and micronutrients it requires.

How can you tell whether your Monstera is content?

How can you prevent your Monstera from drowning? We’ve discussed a little bit about how to avoid overwatering it. Once you get to know your Monstera and understand all of its behaviors, you’ll notice lots of indicators that it needs water. Some of them may not come as a surprise because the indications that a Monstera needs watering are also quite similar to those that other plants exhibit.

Your Monstera’s Soil Is Dry

The primary indication that a Monstera needs watering is dry soil. A Monstera deliciosa shouldn’t thrive in arid conditions, despite the fact that it’s vital to allow the soil dry up a little bit between waterings. Although too-dry soil won’t immediately kill a plant, it will hinder its capacity to grow effectively.

Since every plant and indoor environment is unique and can necessitate a different amount of time between waterings, routinely testing the soil will enable you to determine when your Monstera needs to be watered. Using your finger is the simplest method for doing this!

If the soil is dry after sticking your finger in it for about an inch, water the plant. Don’t water your Monstera just yet if it’s moist or still wet.

Your Monstera is Leaning Over

Although it is an unusual indicator, I have observed a leaning Monstera in my collection. An underwatered Monstera will begin to sag in a manner that causes the leaves to droop, which is similar to wilting. On a little Monstera, this is much simpler to see, although it can be seen on bigger plants as well.

Always examine the soil before watering because leaning plants might occasionally be an indication of a different problem, such as overwatering. Never add more water when the earth is damp; dry soil indicates that it is time to water.

Your Monstera should bounce back within a few days after receiving a thorough watering if the cause of drooping is too little water. As much stress as possible should be avoided allowing the Monstera to become this dry as it will stunt the plant’s growth.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Curling

Leaf curling is just another sign that a Monstera needs watering. The leaves of a Monstera that needs water will start to curl inward, making them appear smaller and less wide.

This is a temporary problem that almost always goes away with some time and some good watering! If the soil is dry, check it and give it a nice, thorough watering. Within a few days, the leaves ought to resume their regular state.

If they don’t, there might be another problem going on. Before watering once more, take some time to run a diagnostic.

Your Monstera’s Leaves are Brown, Yellow, or Dead

An alarming sign may be the yellowing of your Monstera’s leaves. Dark green, waxy leaves are present on a healthy, happy Monstera (though younger plants or new leaves may be lighter green).

Some discoloration is expected because older Monstera leaves gradually turn yellow and drop off as they become older. However, you have an issue if you notice many sections of the plant with yellow, brown, or dead leaves or new leaves.

In addition to underwatering, additional issues that might cause leaf discoloration include overwatering, excessive or insufficient sunshine, or parasites. Don’t water the plant right away; instead, take the time to inspect it for any signs of these issues.

Although older growth will occasionally die off, you should take immediate action if any leaf loss is accompanied by other symptoms like drooping or discolouration. The soil’s moisture content should always be checked as the initial step. Water the soil deeply if it is dry. Look for indications that your plant may have been overwatered if the soil is wet.

Your Monstera Isn’t Putting Out Fenestrated Leaves

With adult Monsteras that haven’t started fenestrating or that produce leaves with holes in them, a lack of fenestration can become a problem. Fenestrations are nearly always a sign that the plant is not receiving enough light.

This can occasionally be brought on by inadequate sunlight. Examine the surroundings of the plant to rule that out. Monsteras require six to twelve hours a day of bright indirect sunlight. Try transplanting the plant to a brighter location if it isn’t receiving this much light.

Set a smart alarm to remind you to inspect the soil if lighting isn’t the issue and you think your Monstera needs extra water. This will assist you in forming the practice of routine plant maintenance. You can establish the ideal watering balance by making sure the soil is moist enough many times per week. Be careful not to overwater, though!