When To Add Moss Pole To Monstera

In the wild, Monsteras spread by vertically climbing up trees and other structures where their aerial roots cling to the bark to sustain their hefty stems and huge leaves. Since they do not harm the plant they are growing on, monsteras are not parasitic. As an epiphyte, Monstera deliciosa is a plant that grows on another plant, which is the correct classification.

Moss poles or other support structures provide a few advantages for an indoor plant. They might first assist in training the plant to develop in the desired direction. Without a moss pole, a Monstera can lean to one side, usually in the direction of the light source, and become unsteady enough to topple over. The Monstera is made to follow an upright growth pattern using a moss pole. With an upright Monstera, your plant will look nicer and won’t take up as much room on the floor.

Additionally, monsteras growing on moss poles have a propensity to produce larger leaves and their distinctive fenestration (leaf holes) more quickly. Additionally, soaking the moss pole adds additional humidity and nutrients via the aerial roots, promoting the growth of your plant.

When should I plant Monstera with a moss pole?

Some nurseries, garden centers, and specialized plant shops sell moss poles, or you can create your own at home. By inserting the moss pole into the soil at the plant’s stem’s base, you can add a moss pole to the container holding your monstera. Put enough downward pressure on it so that the dirt holds it in place. Keep in mind that eventually it will be bearing the weight of the monstera! The monstera stem should be attached to the moss pole using twist ties, string, or zip ties such that the plant’s aerial roots or nodes are in touch with the moss. Monstera needs to be manually fastened to the pole until its aerial roots start to grow into the moss as it matures. Anytime is a good time to add a moss pole to your monstera’s pot, but if you want to start out ahead of the game, do it when the plant is young and has only recently started to develop aerial roots.

In Monstera, where should I place the moss pole?

Aroid Monstera Deliciosa is a climber. Without a supporting framework, its leaves won’t enlarge and become more fenestrated.

The greatest time to add a moss pole is while you are repotting your plant, but only if it is what your plant needs.

A moss pole can be erected either direction; there is no need to disturb the plant. However, if you are repottering, be sure to put your Monstera Deliciosa in its pot again in a location that is a little off-center from the center. The best location for a moss pole to stand is in the pot’s middle.

The moss pole must penetrate the pot deeply. Thus that it won’t be bothered in the future if there are big leaves hanging from its top.

Your Monstera Deliciosa will have thick stems with aerial roots emerging from the nodes, as you will notice. The thickest stem needs to be attached to the moss pole first.

To ensure that the aerial roots keep expanding around the moss pole, spray it once or twice a week.

Although it may seem like extra work, doing this will provide your plant the additional water it needs to maintain its top foliage.

You might have to give up a leaf if you still see them sticking out of the pot and taking up horizontal space.

Although it’s not ideal, pruning those lovely leaves will ensure that all future development occurs vertically.

Last but not least, light is the most organic approach to control the direction of new growth. So remember to take use of light. Instead of growing upward, a Monstera Deliciosa may tilt heavily to one side.

You might be able to sort things out if you twist the plant such that it appears to be leaning away from the source of light. because the plant changes its course and moves in that direction.

Monstera (Monstera deliciosa)

Knowing a plant’s origins is crucial for assessing its compatibility for your space and planning the care it will require. Native to desert areas, these plants need a lot of sunlight and loose, quickly draining soil. Strong sunlight and copious humidity will require some shelter for plants from the jungle bottom.

Monstera is a climbing plant endemic to Mexico and Central America’s rainforests that uses aerial roots to clamber up and through the branches of trees. On mature leaves, the peculiar perforations that give it the nickname “Swiss cheese plant” appear. The exact cause of this adaptation is unknown, but it is made possible through a genetically encoded process that is rare in the world of plants and in which cells plan their own demise through programmed cell death.

Growing plants within the house require the support of a moss-covered, climbable pole. If properly cared for, monstera can live for many years and reach heights of well over ten feet.

Incorrect names for Monstera deliciosa include split-leaf philodendron and Philodenron pertusum. These names, which are synonyms for monstera or Monstera deliciosa*, are no longer regarded as acceptable plant names.

Light:

Monsteras should be kept out of direct sunlight and planted in areas with bright, filtered light or light shade from March to September, when they are actively growing. Your plant will be protected from a tropical tree canopy in its natural rainforest by the leaves of the trees outside the window or a sheer curtain. Alternately, a spot in a well-lit area away from a window can do.

The plant need more direct, strong light during the winter. To maintain the health and appealing characteristics of monsteras, which have huge, glossy leaves with well-developed divisions, it is crucial to provide that additional light exposure.

Water and Humidity:

Check back after 15 minutes to remove any water still in the plant’s run-off dish after giving the soil a good thorough watering to make it moist but not soggy. Allow the soil to almost completely dry out between waterings when the plant is actively growing. For ideal humidity, mist the plant and its moss pole every day or give a damp pebble tray. Every week, wash the leaves with warm water.

Temperature:

Normal house temperatures range between 55 and 65 degrees Fahrenheit in the winter and are fine during the growth season. The relaxation that happens at these colder winter temperatures is beneficial to monsteras. Once the temperature reaches 65 degrees, your plant will start growing again, but this time with more humidity and water.

Ensure that this plant is shielded from sudden changes in temperature caused by open windows, air conditioners, and heating vents.

Re-potting:

Monsteras prefer to be root-bound and can remain in the same pot for years until switching to a pot one size larger when the roots start to protrude past the drain hole. Soil that drains quickly is crucial. The ideal ratio is usually equal parts potting soil, peat, and sand. Replace the top layer of soil every other year after the pot’s maximum capacity is achieved.

What to Watch for:

The aerial roots are crucial for nutrition and climbing. The most beautiful plants have strong aerial roots, so let them alone. Encourage some of these roots to grow into the moss-covered support for your plant as it develops into a vine, leaving the remaining ones exposed so they may take in moisture from the surrounding atmosphere. (You can create your own supporting pole for a monstera by inserting the end of a tube of wrapped plastic netting deep into the soil of the pot.)

It is normal and gradual for the oldest leaves to fall off. If you overwater or underfeed your plants, the leaves may become yellow and drop in greater quantities.

Stretching of the leaf stems and the emergence of stunted leaves without holes may be signs of insufficient light, especially in the winter. Your plant requires energy to grow strong, robust leaves, but it might not be getting enough light or taking a crucial winter break.

How do I get my Monstera to start climbing?

One of the benefits of growing Monstera deliciosa inside for fans is its capacity to develop into a substantial cornerstone for a jungle-themed home. However, that expansion also creates some issues because a Monstera can quickly outgrow its allotted space. Large Monsteras typically grow outward, unlike other common houseplants with an upward, tree-like growth pattern (such the fiddle-leaf fig or rubber plant). Because of this, many people prefer their Monstera deliciosa to climb rather than trail.

How can I encourage Monstera deliciosa to climb? You can encourage your Monstera deliciosa to grow upright by providing a support system, such as a moss pole, coco coir pole, or trellis. This teaches the plant to follow its innate tendency to climb, which may result in a healthier plant with more leaves.

The good news is that Monsteras are designed for ascent. You can get this plant off the ground and out of the way if the correct circumstances and some encouragement are there. I’ll go through some specifics regarding how and why Monsteras are frequently observed climbing on moss poles throughout this article and provide you with advice on teaching this plant to climb.

A moss pole needs to be damp, right?

Moss poles are the ideal choice if you said “yes” to any of these inquiries.

When it comes to growing climbing plants, moss poles have completely changed my life. They give your plant stability and encourage upward growth, just as they would in their natural environment. Learning how to keep the pole moist is the only challenge with it.

Yes, it is crucial to maintain moisture on your poles, especially if they are home to a tropical plant. Consider moss poles in this way: they provide additional sources of humidity for your plants while guaranteeing that their leaves develop perfectly.

How is a Monstera moss pole pinned?

Since cheese plants are epiphytes, they are vertically growing plants that rely on the support of surrounding plants. Therefore, growing cheese plants on a moss pole is a great imitation of how they naturally grow. For cheese plants, moss poles provide both the environment it requires to lift its heavy stem upright and an attractive aesthetic.

A sturdy stake that is a little bit taller than the plant is required. Cut a piece of fine mesh wire just big enough to wrap around the stake using wire snips. The wire mesh hoop around the wooden post is securely fastened with wood staples. Use sopped sphagnum moss to complete this cheese plant support. The moss should be pushed into the mesh to fill in the area around the stake.

Without the stake, you may easily create a Monstera moss pole by just filling a mesh tube with the moss and securing the edges, although I believe the stake increases the solidity. Philodendron stems can grow to be quite big and hefty.

Which pole suits Monstera the best?

Best Moss Pole for Monstera, in brief

  • For MonsteraTOP PICK, DUSPRO 2 Pack 25 Inch Real Moss Pole.
  • 26.4-inch BESMYJ Moss Pole for Plants.
  • 26.4-inch coir totem plant support with monkey moss.
  • SUNSET LEAVES Moss Pole, 27.5 inches, Paper Pipe.
  • 12 inch Grow Organiks Coco Coir Pole

Are Monsteras misted?

Monstera Deliciosas may tolerate low to high levels of indirect, dappled light. Their leaves may burn and scorch if exposed to direct sunlight for an extended period of time. Low light conditions will inhibit growth.

Make sure your Variegated Monstera Deliciosa gets enough of bright indirect light if you have one.

Water

You should spritz your Monstera Deliciosa frequently and water it once a week. In the winter, when you may only need to water your plant every two weeks, let the soil dry up in between waterings.

Humidity

Because Monstera Deliciosa prefers a humid atmosphere, we advise often wetting its leaves. To boost the humidity of the air around your plant, you might also place it close to other plants.

Additional care information

From a stem and leaf cutting, you may quickly reproduce your monstera deliciosa in water. Make sure to make the cut just below a stem node.

The Monstera Deliciosa’s huge leaves are readily covered in dust over time. Use a moist towel to routinely wipe them.

Troubleshooting

Yellowing leaves may indicate that your Monstera Deliciosa has experienced moisture shock or has received too much light.

Browning leaves are a sign that your plant has been receiving insufficient light or has been exposed to low humidity.

What can I do about my lanky Monstera?

Like all plants, a Monstera deliciosa can become sparse and lanky from a lack of sunshine. The issue itself is simple to identify, but how can you put a stop to it? How do you mend a Monstera that is “leggy” and what does that mean?

When a Monstera doesn’t receive enough light, it becomes leggy and becomes elongated and sparse. Once a leggy Monstera has been identified, it can be treated by cutting back the leggy growth and making sure the plant continues to receive enough sunshine going ahead.

It can be frightening whenever your plant starts to appear less than healthy. Leggy, fortunately, is a simple problem to resolve. So don’t be afraid! Continue reading to learn what the issue is, how to resolve it, what kind of light a Monstera requires, and how to accommodate Monsteras in low-light conditions.

How can I prevent Monstera from climbing?

Right now, Monstera Deliciosa is a stylish and well-liked houseplant, and it’s simple to understand why. The room’s broad, glossy, dark-green leaves have a tropical feel to it, and under the correct circumstances, they develop swiftly. In fact, this plant’s potential for growing too large for some homes is one of its only drawbacks. When a Monstera grows large, it often tips over or leans to one side.

How can a Monstera Deliciosa be kept from leaning over? Staking a Monstera Deliciosa with a support like a moss pole, trellis, or garden stakes is the best way to keep it growing upright. These natural climbers can be trained to climb these poles by being connected to them, and they will be supported as they do so.

Although a Monstera won’t be harmed by not growing upright, most people like them to be as straight and tall as possible for aesthetic and spatial reasons. To help you keep your Monstera looking the way you want it to, I’ll go into further depth below why why this occurs in the first place.