What To Do When Monstera Gets Too Big

Monsteras don’t mind if their roots are a little constrained in terms of pot size. They only require repotting around every two to three years. You can repot your Monstera into the same pot rather than size it up if you want to prevent it from growing any bigger. You are still able to feed your Monstera nutrition while also telling it to stop growing further.

In order for your plant to retain water for at least a few days, make sure there is enough potting soil surrounding the roots. The remaining soil in a pot that is completely filled with roots may quickly dry up and harm your plant.

In this instance, consider root pruning. Although it can be unsettling because we always take care to protect the roots of our plants, they can withstand some harsh treatment. One of the greatest ways to maintain a Monstera in the same size pot without endangering the plant’s general health is to trim back roots.

How should an overgrown Monstera be pruned?

Fortunately, trimming a monstera is not too difficult. Since they are a hardy plant, they don’t need to be meticulously pruned. In other words, even if you don’t perform a great job, your plant will probably be alright.

You’ll want to remember a few things, though:

1. Put on gloves. When pruning or propagating your monstera, be sure to use protective gloves because the sap is poisonous and can cause severe skin irritation.

2. Use a tidy, sharp instrument. You can avoid crushing or damaging the stem by using sharp pruning shears or a knife to make the cut. Your plant is also shielded from hazardous microorganisms by clean tools. Bacterial diseases can even spread to your other plants and are difficult to treat. (Protect your monstera from insects, fungi, and bacteria with our Houseplant Leaf Armor!)

Instead of slicing the stem off, just give it a good snip or chop while cutting. The cleanest cut will be made as a result.

3. If you can, prune in the spring, especially if you want to promote growth. Growth spurts occur in the spring and summer for the majority of plants, including monstera. Pruning in the spring will yield the best benefits and hasten the recovery of your plant. You should prune in the spring because that is when your cuttings will grow the fastest if you intend to propagate them.

4. Arrange the slices. Starting at the base of the stem, remove any outdated or diseased leaves.

Cut where you want the plant to grow if you are pruning to promote growth. Make a top cut if you want it to grow higher.

When the time comes to actually trim your monstera, keep in mind that pruning promotes growth so choose where to make your cuts. You can safely reduce the plant’s size if you’re pruning to manage your monstera’s size. Just remember that it will eventually need to be done again because it will grow back.

5. Be sure to cut below a node if you’re propagating. Don’t be concerned if you’re only trimming to reduce the size of your plant or get rid of dead leaves. However, if you want to grow your cuttings from them, make sure that they have a node, which is a tiny knob that develops on the stem opposite a leaf. When your cutting begins to grow, these will subsequently develop into aerial roots!

Try our new Houseplant Propagation Promoter!

6. Prevent unintentional proliferation. When you’re done pruning, be careful to dispose of your cuttings in the trash if you’re not going to propagate them because if you place them in a compost pile or somewhere else where they can root in the earth, they’ll start to grow roots.

I’m done now! Don’t be afraid to prune your monstera; it’s an essential yet easy component of care for this plant. This plant develops rapidly and bounces back quickly from pruning. Good fortune!

How can I shrink my Monstera plant?

Almost all plants benefit greatly from pruning. It prevents them from expanding too quickly, enables them to concentrate on the healthy parts, and promotes new growth. Pruning is crucial for the general health of your Monstera plant, even if it may seem counterproductive to keeping the plant small to do anything that promotes new development. Your Monstera will remain content and manageable with regular pruning.

You’ll need a pair of well-kept scissors or shears to get started. To ensure that no cuts are contaminated with bacteria, you must sanitize the clippers before making any cuts. I clean my shears using a diluted bleach solution of 1 bleach to 9 water.

Before you begin slicing up your plant, try to make a list of everything you want to remove, bearing in mind how each cut will change the way the plant looks overall. Remove any old, yellow, or brown leaves first, and then trim any healthy pieces that are a little too far out for your taste. Individual leaves or even small pieces of the stem can be clipped back to the plant.

Can I completely prune back my Monstera?

Carefully remove your Monstera from its pot. If it is difficult to remove, tap the container’s sides to assist the soil come loose, or use a butter knife to loosen the soil’s hold on the inside edge of the pot. The roots’ dirt should be brushed off. The roots can also be broken apart or unraveled to make them simpler to handle.

Look for any damage or rot indications in the roots, such as browning or mushy roots. After trimming them, clean the shears right away.

It’s time to begin chopping the roots now! Try to stay away from the main stem root, which is typically considerably larger and thicker than the others, and keep the amount you cut to no more than 1/3 of the entire volume of roots.

All that remains to be done is to repot your Monstera in new soil and place it where it was previously. Watch for any indications of trauma, such as drooping or yellowing leaves. Furthermore, take care not to overwater your plant.

Does Monstera require climbing?

What should you do if your Monstera becomes so tall that it begins to topple over? It need a ladder to ascend!

In its native rainforest habitat, monsteras are climbing plants and can be found climbing trees. We replicate this for potted Monsteras by using a moss pole or other vertical support. This prevents the large plant from taking over your living room and enables your Monstera to grow upwards toward the light without toppling over and breaking its stem.

Pick your timing

The optimum time to divide or propagate your monstera is in the early spring because that is when it grows. They’ll have a better chance of overcoming root stress and resuming growth.

Water before you split

Before splitting the root ball, it should be well-hydrated. Give the roots a good soak a week before you carry out the deed so that water begins to flow out of the bottom of the pot. (Your pot has effective drainage, correct?)

Make the split

Carefully tip the pot on its side and slip the plant out when you’re ready to split your monstera. To avoid breaking anything, you might need assistance holding the plant or pot.

Use a garden shovel to gently encourage the plant out if it won’t come up on its own. Do not pull the plant out of the pot under any circumstances! There is no way you want to break any stems or leaves since they won’t grow back.

Once the monstera has been removed from the pot, divide the root ball into two or more plants using a sharp, clean knife. To ensure that each new plant has lots of roots and stems, look for natural sections and divisions in the existing plant.

This is something you kind of have to eyeball and look for any locations where the plant has already divided up. This will guarantee that the plant will rapidly begin growing after the split has healed.

Plant the new monsteras

It’s time to move the individual plants into their new pots after you’ve divided your monstera into two or more plants.

Perhaps you need containers that are smaller than the one the large plant was in. Select containers with sufficient drainage that are 2-4 inches wider than the new plants’ roots. Plant in a soil with peat, such as our specialty monstera soil, that drains well.

When the plants are in their new pots, give them some water, and position them somewhere with bright, indirect light.

To promote recuperation and new development, you can begin fertilizing the plants around a month after you separate them!

Allow Bright, Indirect Sunlight Exposure

Among all the elements that support fenestration on a monstera, light is at the top of the list.

The majority of Monstera plants I’ve come across that don’t fenestrate are frequently planted in a dimly lit, shaded section of the home.

How is a sizable cheese plant supported?

Since cheese plants are epiphytes, they are vertically growing plants that rely on the support of surrounding plants. Therefore, growing cheese plants on a moss pole is a great imitation of how they naturally grow. For cheese plants, moss poles provide both the environment it requires to lift its heavy stem upright and an attractive aesthetic.

A sturdy stake that is a little bit taller than the plant is required. Cut a piece of fine mesh wire just big enough to wrap around the stake using wire snips. The wire mesh hoop around the wooden post is securely fastened with wood staples. Use sopped sphagnum moss to complete this cheese plant support. The moss should be pushed into the mesh to fill in the area around the stake.

Without the stake, you may easily create a Monstera moss pole by just filling a mesh tube with the moss and securing the edges, although I believe the stake increases the solidity. Philodendron stems can grow to be quite big and hefty.

Should I trim the aerial roots of my monsteras?

Your Monstera naturally has aerial roots. No need to chop them off, please. As long as you use a clean, sharp blade and cut them back if they are blocking the path, it is acceptable.

The main plant of your Monstera won’t suffer if the aerial roots are cut off. These roots are designed to ascend, not to absorb nourishment.

For additional information on what to do with the aerial roots of your Monstera, keep reading!

When should a monstera plant be replanted?

Low upkeep is required when caring for monstera plants. The interior of the plant must be at least 65 °F (18 °C) heated, preferably higher. Swiss cheese plants also require a lot of humidity and somewhat moist soil. A wooden or moss-covered pole placed in the center of the pot will offer the additional support that the aerial roots require.

Every year when the plant is young, repotting cheese plants is done to promote development and aerate the soil. Increase the size of your containers until you reach the biggest pot you intend to use. After then, the plant need a fresh top-dress of rich soil every year but can survive being root-bound for a number of years at a time.

Repotting Monstera is best done in the early spring before the plant develops new leaves.

How should I trim my Monstera?

, you should separate each leaf and node on either side of the node/aerial root into independent segments.

The youngest leaf has a node that was still propagation-viable despite not having fully matured (you can kind of see it bumping through).

After you have separated your cuttings, you should remove any outdated sheathing from the leaf stems. When submerged in water for an extended period of time, they can decay and hinder the propagation process.

Your cuttings are now ready to go to their temporary residence. All you need is water and a vessel—I like clear ones.

It’s best to let the cuts to “heal” or dry up a little bit before immersing the cuttings in water. This only takes a little while.

The aerial root can be cut back, but I prefer to leave mine uncut. To make it sit comfortably at the bottom of my vessel, I simply delicately wrap it up.

The remaining stems are then arranged in the vessel, each one being spaced apart to allow for proper root development as well as aesthetic appeal once they are planted in soil. Due to their new root system, there isn’t much room to try to arrange them at that time.

Simply add water to completely cover the roots and ends once they are positioned how you like.

Place it somewhere bright, but not in the sun, and replace the water every three to five days. After roughly 2-3 weeks, roots should start to form!

In addition to new roots, it has also sprouted a huge number of new leaves.

Here is a picture of my very first effort at growing a monstera. I took the above steps, potted the cuttings in soil after around three months, and continued. It has thrived ever since I started watering it once a week!

Your inquiries are addressed:

Yes! Once they are in the proper light and receiving the appropriate amount of water, they are excellent for beginners and very simple to care for.

I plant them in a well-draining pot using ordinary Miracle Grow indoor potting soil. No need for moss or pearls.

Yes, to answer simply. That is a factor in the propagation process. I wouldn’t recommend making excessive or frequent cuts because you run the danger of harming the plant by putting it into shock.

It’s usually time for a new and larger pot when you can see the roots through the dirt or when you notice the growth has significantly halted.

All of my plants receive fertilizer during the growth season (April to September). I will fertilize every other week because I water them all once a week. I prefer liquid fertilizers (plant food) since I can regulate the amount that each plant receives.

In the summer, grocery stores like Kroger or your neighborhood Lowe’s or Home Depot may stock them. It’s always a good idea to check for nearby and online nurseries, such as