Should You Rotate Your Monstera

Monsteras are easy to care for and have moderate needs for water, sunshine, and temperature. For information on how to maintain the health of your plant, see their care instructions below.

Light: A monstera’s leaves must receive the proper quantity of sunshine to grow. Put it in a location where it will get filtered, indirect light. A monstera plant can develop yellow or burned leaves from too much direct sunshine. Keep an eye on your plant since you might need to rotate it if you notice that its leaves are reaching for the sun.

Water: When the top few inches of soil are dry, you should water your plant. To determine how dry the earth is, stick your finger into it. Since excessive moisture might cause root rot, monsteras like peaty, well-draining soil. Over time, these plants can also develop aerial roots. These roots can either be placed in the soil or covered with wet sphagnum moss to ensure they receive plenty of water.

Temperature: The monstera plant prefers 68–86°F temperatures in a typical room. This plant will thrive in a similar tropical, humid environment because it is native to tropical rain forests. If you reside in a dry climate, misting your monstera deliciosa once a week will improve the humidity around the plant.

Toxicity: The larger species is not recommended for pet owners due to the poisonous nature of all portions of this plant, with the exception of the ripe fruit. Choose a miniature species, such as the M. deliciosa borsigiana, that you can store high on shelves to keep curious animals away from nibbling. Because of the calcium oxalates in its sap, the plant can cause skin irritation when touched and stomach problems if consumed. As long as you avoid ingesting any plant parts and handle it with extra caution, it is still safe to have in your house. To learn more about what on do if a piece of a monstera is consumed, look at our guide to dangerous plants.

Pests: Mealybugs, scales, aphids, and spider mites are frequently found under the leaves of monstera plants. To maintain them clean and free of dust, wipe their leaves down roughly once each week. Their glossy, dark green leaves remain healthy thanks to this regular upkeep. If you do discover little creatures in your plant, you can get rid of the pests by wiping them off with a mild dishwashing solution or a moderate insecticide.

Problems: As we previously indicated, if your plant doesn’t get enough sunlight, the leaves may not grow properly. Move your monstera to an area with more lighting if you see that the leaves aren’t splitting properly.

If Monstera deliciosa plants are malnourished or overwatered, their leaves may become yellow. If this occurs, wait until you can feel the earth drying before watering your plant again. Replace the soil in your monstera’s pot if the issue continues. If none of those remedies work, you can feed your plant some homemade fertilizer or plant food to restore the health of its leaves. Checking to see if the leaves are “sweating” is one technique to distinguish between the two; this is another indicator of overwatering.

Low humidity and dry air can cause brown leaf tips or edges. To fix this, spritz your plant once each week or have a humidifier close by.

Repotting: Large plants, like monsteras, require repotting every two years to support their expanding root systems. To give your monstera more area to grow, use a pot that is a few inches taller and wider than the one you previously used. To maintain a moderate size, you can regularly trim back its leaves, repot it less frequently, or leave it in the same pot. For more detailed repotting advice, see our guide on repotting a plant.

Air layering is a typical technique of monsteras’ propagation. Continue reading to learn how to achieve this.

Put a layer of moist flowery or sphagnum moss over the notch, root, and node where the leaf meets the stem in this location.

Wrap the moss in plastic loosely enough to allow you to monitor the roots while also keeping it secure. With string or other connections, you can fasten the plastic and moss together.

With simple care instructions, monstera deliciosa plants are a gem to have in your home. Maintaining your monstera will make the plant happy and earn you tons of compliments.

Do Monsteras enjoy being turned?

To keep your Monstera growing as straight as possible for as long as possible, there are a few additional things you may do.

Consider your light source first. As monsteras grow toward the light, the side that is closest to a window will typically weigh more. Your Monstera should grow more evenly if you occasionally rotate the pot.

Additionally, you could prune your Monstera to encourage the desired shape. In order to balance the volume of the plant in the pot, you would probably cut down the growth on one side. If the stem is cut below a node, the cutting can be rooted in water or soil and given to a friend. You’ll probably need to prune more than once because it encourages new growth, especially in the spring and summer.

Finally, you could rotate the root ball when you repot your Monstera to make it more upright if it is lopsided to one side. As long as you make sure that all of the roots are still submerged beneath the potting soil, there shouldn’t be any issues.

My Monstera should not be leaning.

Monsteras’ beauty is ruined and their growth may be hampered if they are allowed to tilt to one side or the other. Instead of waiting until the Monstera is leaning over, support should be added as soon as possible. You must add supports to keep the plant upright after the stems begin to sag beneath the weight of the leaves.

Which way should a Monstera be facing?

The proper lighting is one of the most crucial aspects of developing a gorgeous, healthy monstera. To do this, you must become familiar with the signals that your monstera wants more light.

In general, monsteras thrive beside a bright window where the sun’s rays don’t directly hit the leaves since they enjoy bright, indirect sunlight.

Frequently, an east- or south-facing window is the ideal location for a monstera. Windows that face north may not be light enough, but they are still far better than nothing! and a window facing west can bring in too much direct, warm afternoon light.

Your monstera will let you know if it doesn’t have enough light. The warning signals that your monstera needs more light are listed below.

Is rotating plants bad?

Phototropism, which doesn’t truly entail leaning at all, is the technique that makes a houseplant lean toward light. Auxin cells are found in all plants, and the rate at which they grow influences the shape of the plant.

Auxins on the side of the plant that receives direct sunlight grow shorter and more robustly, whereas auxins on the side of the plant that receives more shade grow longer and more spindly. This causes your plant to grow taller on one side than the other, giving it the craning, bending appearance.

However, turning indoor plants frequently will keep them looking their best and promote healthier, more robust growth.

Does Monstera require climbing?

What should you do if your Monstera becomes so tall that it begins to topple over? It need a ladder to ascend!

In its native rainforest habitat, monsteras are climbing plants and can be found climbing trees. By use a moss pole or other vertical support, we reproduce this for potted Monsteras. This prevents the large plant from taking over your living room and enables your Monstera to grow upwards toward the light without toppling over and breaking its stem.

How do I get my Monstera to start climbing?

One of the benefits of growing Monstera deliciosa inside for fans is its capacity to develop into a substantial cornerstone for a jungle-themed home. However, that expansion also creates some issues because a Monstera can quickly outgrow its allotted space. Large Monsteras typically grow outward, unlike other common houseplants with an upward, tree-like growth pattern (such the fiddle-leaf fig or rubber plant). Because of this, many people prefer their Monstera deliciosa to climb rather than trail.

How can I encourage Monstera deliciosa to climb? You can encourage your Monstera deliciosa to grow upright by providing a support system, such as a moss pole, coco coir pole, or trellis. This teaches the plant to follow its innate tendency to climb, which may result in a healthier plant with more leaves.

The good news is that Monsteras are designed for ascent. You can get this plant off the ground and out of the way if the correct circumstances and some encouragement are there. I’ll go through some specifics regarding how and why Monsteras are frequently observed climbing on moss poles throughout this article and provide you with advice on teaching this plant to climb.

Why is my Monstera so droopy?

The Monstera prefers persistently moist soil. Make sure your plant is not being overwatered or overgrown. Water according to a regular schedule when the top 2-3 inches of soil are dry.

You can see weak, drooping, and perhaps even turning dark leaves if you unintentionally let the soil on your Monstera plant dry out completely. A thorough soak is necessary if the soil is very dry over the entire container.

How to soak-water your Monstera is as follows:

  • Without the saucer, put your plant in the sink or bathtub. Pour roughly 3 to 4 cups of water into your basin. Check to see if the water is warm.
  • Give your plant at least 45 minutes to absorb water through the drainage hole in the bottom of the pot.
  • After giving your plant a soak, feel the soil’s top to see if the water has gotten to the top 2-3 inches.
  • If the soil on your Monstera doesn’t feel completely saturated, water it a little from the top to hasten soaking.
  • Drain the sink or tub once the soil of your plant is evenly moist, and then leave it to rest while it completely drains. Put the plant back in its proper place on the saucer.

As a tropical plant, your Monstera will flourish in more humid conditions. By regularly spraying the leaves of your plant, using a pebble tray, or placing a humidifier close by, you can raise the humidity level in the area around it.

What causes my Monstera to topple over?

Due mostly to its spectacular leaves, the Monstera deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) is a common houseplant. Although they are simple to care for, these fellas do have one drawback: if they feel neglected, they have a tendency to pout, which may cause your Monstera leaves to droop. Don’t panic too much. They can quickly be persuaded to recover with a little loving attention.

The most frequent cause of drooping monstera leaves is dehydration. They prefer their soil to always be just moist enough. Other contributing factors include overwatering, poor lighting, issues with fertilizer, pests, or transplant stress. The most crucial step in restoring your plant to health is figuring out what the issue is.

Why is the sideways growth of my monstera plant?

With this monstrous plant, it makes me feel as though I’m back in the rainforest! Simply adore it!

The famous Swiss Cheese plant, monstera deliciosa, is undoubtedly impressive. It will repay you with this incredible jungly home atmosphere if you provide it with the necessary circumstances and space to flourish. And after a long day, who wouldn’t want to retreat to the jungle? I do, without a doubt! Take a mojito, relax under your monstera, turn on some jungle music, and there you have it!

The gorgeous cut leaf forms are so captivating they make you feel as though you are in the tropics. These gorgeous plants, which are native to the jungles of Central America, add a wow element to your house. These plants have a maximum height of 60 feet in the wild. I am aware of its size. After noticing my monstera’s growth spike this year and having just replanted it, I can already tell that if she continues to grow at this rate, I’ll need a larger apartment.

I have had numerous inquiries regarding these stunning plants, so I decided to compile some informative Monstera FAQs, suggestions, and tips to share with you. You might be shocked to learn that these plants are actually considered “easy maintenance” and that caring for them can be highly satisfying:

When do I need to repot my Swiss Cheese plant?

The growth spurt has occurred and is now in full force! In just six months, a monstera plant can almost completely fill a planter with its thick tuberous root system. Ideally, you should repot your monstera once a year in the spring or summer. It’s time to repot your monstera if you pull up the pot and notice that the roots are sticking out the bottom through the drainage holes. Use a well-draining houseplant soil mix for repotting these plants, and be careful not to increase the pot size too much. To improve aeration and drainage, I added pearlite to mine.

What are the crazy roots coming from the stem of my Monstera Deliciosa plant?

These are the aerial roots of the monstera deliciosa. This plant makes a great climber in its natural environment. In its jungle habitat, these aerial roots shoot out in search of objects to cling to and climb on. For this reason, while your monstera is maturing, I usually advise adding a moss stick. This will provide it with support and a point of stability. In the absence of this, there is a possibility that your plant will begin to grow horizontally along the floor while its aerial roots look for something to climb.

Can I propagate my Swiss Cheese plant?

You very certainly can. Create some tiny plants to gift to friends and relatives if you notice that it keeps expanding and blocking your room.

Choose a monstera vine that is at least 12 inches long, mature, and has two or more nodes. To reduce the chance of bacteria and illness, make a clean cut, making sure it’s below a node. Put the leaves above the waterline and submerge the stem and one of the nodes in lukewarm water. Root growth will result from this. Keep in mind to change the water every week. When the roots are at least 4 inches long, the same houseplant compost mix as the mother plant should be used. A cane can be inserted for additional support. Then take a seat, unwind, and watch your baby monstera develop. Good fortune!

Signs to watch out for:

  • Do you notice a lot of unusually long aerial roots and slower-than-normal leaf growth? This could indicate that your plant needs to be repotted because its roots are confined.
  • The plant’s lower leaves are turning yellow. The stem may be becoming dark or black at the base and is wilting. This could indicate that the light is too dim and the soil is becoming permanently saturated. This may result in plant death and root rot. Examine the roots of the plant by removing it from the pot. Everything is fine if they are white-tinged and appear strong and robust. You must take action quickly if they are mushy and brown. Remove all of the afflicted roots while being careful not to damage the healthy ones with a clean pair of scissors. Repot in a fresh container with dry soil. Change to a brighter spot and modify your watering schedule as necessary.
  • brown edges and a sharp curl to the leaves. This is a clear indication of dehydration and excessive sun exposure. In particular during the midday, monstera plants like bright indirect light away from direct sunshine.
  • When you notice a little buildup, frequently dust the enormous, lovely monstera leaves. This dust may obstruct a plant’s pores, preventing it from soaking up the sun’s beneficial rays for healthy growth. All you need is a clean, moist towel to give it a quick once-over every week or two if you notice dust building up.
  • Is the area where you have your Monstera Deliciosa darker than you would like? If you have no other place to put it and you find the soil is taking a while to dry out, you might try poking the dirt with a pair of chopsticks (just the top half). This replicates how worms and other invertebrates would normally carry out this function in the nature by introducing some oxygen. In the event that you see the soil isn’t drying out too rapidly, you can do this around once a month.
  • On the top soil of my Monstera Deliciosa plant, I discovered mold. Try moving it to a brighter place and reducing the watering frequency, ensuring sure the top few inches of soil are drying out between waterings. This is usually a sign of too much water and not enough light.

I sincerely hope that this information is useful, but please feel free to contact me with any additional inquiries. Enjoy taking care of this wonderful plant.

Look at the Monstera Monkey Leaf plant and Monstera Minima if you want something a little bit smaller but with the same beauty as a Monstera Deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) (both seen below). They are related to the Swiss Cheese Plant and have leaves that are famous for having been slashed, although they are considerably more fragile than their larger cousin.