Should You Prune A Monstera

Pruning is a crucial component of any plant care regimen. Pruning gets rid of leaves that no longer help the plant but are still consuming its resources. As a result, the healthy leaves and new growth can be supported with more energy! You may manage a plant’s size and shape via pruning. Therefore, remember to prune your monstera!

Additionally, pruning can help your plant grow and allow you to manage where it produces new leaves (and in the case of some plants, branches).

Because your monstera occasionally needs a little additional assistance getting rid of dead or dying leaves, pruning is especially crucial.

However, pruning is primarily a useful method for managing a monstera’s size. This plant grows really big! If you live in an apartment with 8-foot ceilings, this is crucial because monsteras can grow up to 30 feet outdoors and 10 feet indoors.

Should I prune my Monstera’s leaves?

Your Monstera should have any damaged leaves removed. Trimming dead leaves helps your plant’s health in addition to improving its appearance.

  • Unable to photosynthesize are dead leaves. Any brown or black areas on your Monstera’s leaves are no longer able to supply the plant with energy.
  • Dead leaf sections have no protection against rot and infection in comparison to healthy leaves. Dead plant cells provide nutrients that are consumed by bacteria and fungi. For instance, you can notice mold growing on dead leaves that have been left on the plant or in the soil. To help defend the remainder of the plant against these diseases, remove any dark or damaged tissue.

It is possible that only the ripped edge of a leaf will become brown to seal a cut if there is only very minimal damage, such as accidently ripping or torn a portion of the leaf. Leave minor imperfections alone if they don’t affect other parts of the plant or interfere with your pleasure of the plant’s aesthetics.

Monstera damage to the roots and stems can be more serious than damage to the leaves because it prevents the plant from transporting water and nutrients. Visit our soon-to-be-available guides on stem damage and root rot.

How should a leggy Monstera be pruned?

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Before your Monstera’s growing season, in the spring and early summer, pruning should be done. By doing so, you can guarantee that it will have the energy to quickly mend any wounds that have been produced, thereby reducing the risk of infection or pest invasion.

Gather your tools and materials before pruning your Monstera. You will require a pair of sterilizing tools and clean, sharp shears. There are other alternatives to the bleach mixture I advise, though.

The procedure is easy once you’re prepared: Determine which areas of the Monstera require trimming. It is safe to remove any scant or damaged growth. Make a plan before you begin to avoid becoming overwhelmed.

After selecting the stems that require trimming, follow them back to the primary stem or node. Cutting it at a little angle can prevent infection from spreading to the main stem, which could kill the plant.

Although a serious response is unlikely, you might want to wear gloves when working with the Monstera. Due to a substance called calcium oxalate that Monsteras manufacture, the sap has the potential to irritate the skin. If you are handling something without gloves, make sure to thoroughly wash your hands.

How would a leggy Monstera appear?

In their original environment, monsteras are essentially climbing vines that attach to big trees. These plants will resemble a shrub when grown indoors, especially when they are young.

The thickness of the stems, the size of the leaves, and the length of the internodes distinguish a healthy Monstera from one that is lanky as it develops into a vine.

Leggy Monsteras lack the full, bulky leaves and have longer, thinner stems.

A leggy Monstera will also have more space between its leaves. A plant is considered lanky if it appears that there are more stems than leaves.

How should I trim my Monstera?

, you should separate each leaf and node on either side of the node/aerial root into independent segments.

The youngest leaf has a node that was still propagation-viable despite not having fully matured (you can kind of see it bumping through).

After you have separated your cuttings, you should remove any outdated sheathing from the leaf stems. When submerged in water for an extended period of time, they can decay and hinder the propagation process.

Your cuttings are now ready to go to their temporary residence. All you need is water and a vessel—I like clear ones.

It’s best to let the cuts to “heal” or dry up a little bit before immersing the cuttings in water. This only takes a little while.

The aerial root can be cut back, but I prefer to leave mine uncut. I just carefully fold it up to fit comfortably at the bottom of my vessel.

The remaining stems are then arranged in the vessel, each one being spaced apart to allow for proper root development as well as aesthetic appeal once they are planted in soil. Due to their new root system, there isn’t much room to try to arrange them at that time.

Simply add water to completely cover the roots and ends once they are positioned how you like.

Place it somewhere bright, but not in the sun, and replace the water every three to five days. After roughly 2-3 weeks, roots should start to form!

In addition to new roots, it has also sprouted a huge number of new leaves.

Here is a picture of my very first effort at growing a monstera. I followed all of the processes provided and after about 3 months, potted the cuttings in soil. I water it once a week and its been thriving ever since!

Your inquiries are addressed:

Yes! Once they are in the proper light and receiving the appropriate amount of water, they are excellent for beginners and very simple to care for.

I plant them in a well-draining pot using ordinary Miracle Grow indoor potting soil. No need for moss or pearls.

Short answer, sure. That’s one of the reason of proliferating. I wouldn’t recommend making excessive or frequent cuts because you run the danger of harming the plant by putting it into shock.

It’s usually time for a new and larger pot when you can see the roots through the dirt or when you notice the growth has significantly halted.

All of my plants receive fertilizer during the growth season (April to September). I will fertilize every other week because I water them all once a week. I prefer liquid fertilizers (plant food) since I can regulate the amount that each plant receives.

In the summer, grocery stores like Kroger or your neighborhood Lowe’s or Home Depot may stock them. It’s always a good idea to check for nearby and online nurseries, such as

Pruning Your Monstera

All year long, remove dry or dead leaves, but wait any significant trimming for the spring and summer. Use clean, precise shears to trim your Monstera, and remove any extra growth at the stem’s base.

How to Repot a Monstera

The growth of indoor plants is substantially slower than that of wild plants. This is a good thing to do every two to three years to offer new nutrients and promote new development, depending on the size of your plant and the density of the roots.

When to repot – Because of their aerial roots, Monsteras frequently grow outside of the soil. When the time is right, the plant will however let you know by practically starting to climb out of the pot with its larger branches and their roots.

Pot sizing: Choose a nursery pot with a diameter that is 2 larger than the existing pot if you want your plant to grow taller. You can reuse the same container and just swap out the soil if you want your plant to remain the same height.

Put newspaper on the floor, remove the plant from the pot, and shake off as much of the old soil as you can to ensure that the roots are clean. Get your hands messy. Put the plant in the pot’s center, fill the container with fresh soil, and compact it firmly. Place the plant in a location with bright indirect light after fully watering the soil. It will take your plant 2-4 weeks to recover from the shock and become used to its new surroundings.

Staking Monstera

Some Monstera growers want to stake their plants to support them and encourage more vertical growth in addition to aesthetic considerations. You may accomplish this by simply inserting a moss totem and using prongs to secure the plant stems to it. See here for a complete explanation of how to stake the Monstera.

Should I trim the aerial roots of my Monsteras?

Your Monstera naturally has aerial roots. No need to chop them off, please. As long as you use a clean, sharp blade and cut them back if they are blocking the path, it is acceptable.

The main plant of your Monstera won’t suffer if the aerial roots are cut off. These roots are designed to ascend, not to absorb nourishment.

For additional information on what to do with the aerial roots of your Monstera, keep reading!

How can a Monstera be made bushier?

As long as it’s actively developing, monstera deliciosa can be easily propagated at any time of the year. They make excellent propagation candidates because of how quickly they develop, making it possible to give them to friends or add more plants to your home. There are various ways to spread monstera. This is how:

How to Propagate Your Monstera Plant via Leaf Bud Cuttings

Step 1: Fill a container with fresh all-purpose potting soil large enough to handle three or four cuttings.

Step 2: Take a healthy monstera stem from the mother plant and cut a piece off with a clean, sharp blade. Pick a section of the stem with several leaves.

Step 3: Separate that stem into a number of leaf-containing pieces. Aerial roots may also be affixed to segments.

Step 4: Insert three or four stem segments into a single pot. In the new container, this will produce a bushy, full appearance. Before planting, the stem segments can also be propagated in water for a few weeks. The junction between the leaf and stem is where new growth will appear.

Does Monstera require climbing?

What should you do if your Monstera becomes so tall that it begins to topple over? It need a ladder to ascend!

In its native rainforest habitat, monsteras are climbing plants and can be found climbing trees. By use a moss pole or other vertical support, we reproduce this for potted Monsteras. This prevents the large plant from taking over your living room and enables your Monstera to grow upwards toward the light without toppling over and breaking its stem.

What causes my Monstera to topple over?

Due mostly to its spectacular leaves, the Monstera deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) is a common houseplant. Although they are simple to care for, these fellas do have one drawback: if they feel neglected, they have a tendency to pout, which may cause your Monstera leaves to droop. Don’t panic too much. They can quickly be persuaded to recover with a little loving attention.

The most frequent cause of drooping monstera leaves is dehydration. They prefer their soil to always be just moist enough. Other contributing factors include overwatering, poor lighting, issues with fertilizer, pests, or transplant stress. The most crucial step in restoring your plant to health is figuring out what the issue is.

Why are the stems on my Monstera so long?

A plant is referred to as leggy if its stems and leaves are unusually lengthy. Legginess affects the Monstera, along with many other plant species, and it can lessen the usual beauty that these plants are known for having.

Lack of light will result in a monstera plant that is lanky. The plant stretches and moves to where it can get the proper amount of light when it is given insufficient lighting. The plant acquires a lanky appearance as a result, which is characterized by long stems and sparse leaves.

Indoor plants are excellent for purifying the air and fostering a calm atmosphere. Additionally, plants bring value to our living area with their aesthetic appeal. Similar to other plants, monsteras can occasionally be an eyesore if they have an unusual shape.

In this piece, we’ll go through some simple measures to make sure the plant has the correct environment to avoid this occurrence.

How can you assist Monstera in rising?

Right now, Monstera Deliciosa is a stylish and well-liked houseplant, and it’s simple to understand why. The room’s broad, glossy, dark-green leaves have a tropical feel to it, and under the correct circumstances, they develop swiftly. In fact, this plant’s potential for growing too large for some homes is one of its only drawbacks. When a Monstera grows large, it often tips over or leans to one side.

How can a Monstera Deliciosa be kept from leaning over? Staking a Monstera Deliciosa with a support like a moss pole, trellis, or garden stakes is the best way to keep it growing upright. These natural climbers can be trained to climb these poles by being connected to them, and they will be supported as they do so.

Although a Monstera won’t be harmed by not growing upright, most people like them to be as straight and tall as possible for aesthetic and spatial reasons. To help you keep your Monstera looking the way you want it to, I’ll go into further depth below why why this occurs in the first place.