How To Tie Monstera Deliciosa

Next, position the pole so that it lays between your plant and the plant pot’s rim.

Ensure that the stake’s bottom touches the pot’s bottom. This gives the pole stability and keeps your Monstera plant from causing it to topple over.

Firm the soil around the pole

This is a critical step because if the soil around the stake is not firmed up, the stake will become unstable and be vulnerable to squirming or toppling over when your plant is bearing down on it. It’s crucial to anchor the pole in its current location for this reason.

Do I need to secure my Monstera?

There are several advantages to supporting your Monstera’s posture with a stake or moss poll. As epiphytes, or plants that grow vertically in nature by climbing on the other plants surrounding them, Monsteras do so in their natural habitats. Yes, they survive with a little assistance from their friends.

When your Monstera is housed in a pot, it can be more difficult to adapt this epiphytic tendency, but stakes are the ideal “dupe” for other plants. Your Monstera will maintain a beautiful posture that maintains them looking their best by clinging to its stake, reaching upward, and holding its heaviest stems straight. Aerial roots are a favorite feature of monsteras; avoid cutting them! These roots are designed to support the bulky base of your plant, but staking the plant helps to lighten their burden, allowing you to tuck them into the soil of your Monstera and let them rest invisibly.

Do I need to secure my Monstera to a pole?

Sphagnum moss can be used to create a moss pole by being wrapped around a bamboo stick or PVC pipe. To hold the material in place, twirl a string around. The thickest stem of your Monstera Deliciosa should be tied to the pole many places along the stem using a soft plant tie. To encourage vertical development, prune the stems that are developing more horizontally. The plant will eventually grow vertically as its aerial roots cling to the moss pole over time.

How can a monstera plant be taught to climb?

One of the benefits of growing Monstera deliciosa inside for fans is its capacity to develop into a substantial cornerstone for a jungle-themed home. However, that expansion also creates some issues because a Monstera can quickly outgrow its allotted space. Large Monsteras typically grow outward, unlike other common houseplants with an upward, tree-like growth pattern (such the fiddle-leaf fig or rubber plant). Because of this, many people prefer their Monstera deliciosa to climb rather than trail.

How can I encourage Monstera deliciosa to climb? You can encourage your Monstera deliciosa to grow upright by providing a support system, such as a moss pole, coco coir pole, or trellis. This teaches the plant to follow its innate tendency to climb, which may result in a healthier plant with more leaves.

The good news is that Monsteras are designed for ascent. You can get this plant off the ground and out of the way if the correct circumstances and some encouragement are there. I’ll go through some specifics regarding how and why Monsteras are frequently observed climbing on moss poles throughout this article and provide you with advice on teaching this plant to climb.

My monstera keeps toppling over, why?

Due mostly to its spectacular leaves, the Monstera deliciosa (Swiss Cheese Plant) is a common houseplant. Although they are simple to care for, these fellas do have one drawback: if they feel neglected, they have a tendency to pout, which may cause your Monstera leaves to droop. Don’t panic too much. They can quickly be persuaded to recover with a little loving attention.

The most frequent cause of drooping monstera leaves is dehydration. They prefer their soil to always be just moist enough. Other contributing factors include overwatering, poor lighting, issues with fertilizer, pests, or transplant stress. The most crucial step in restoring your plant to health is figuring out what the issue is.

How is a plant fastened to a stake?

Depending on the type of support a plant needs, there are four main ways to stake it.

  • 1.Single stake: The single stake is used most frequently when staking plants. Garden centers carry metal, plastic, bamboo, wooden, and stakes that can be used to secure plants using plastic plant ties. Just next to the plant, drive a stake about six inches into the earth to be used as a single plant stake. If at all possible, avoid cutting any plant roots. Use garden ties, garden twine, or even velcro to secure the plant to the stake at a point about two-thirds of the way up the plant. Some plants require additional support, and they might not be supported by a single stake. Plants can be staked to many supports in these circumstances.
  • 2.Ring-style support: Plants with many stems, such as strawberries, can be supported using a metal ring. These ring-shaped supports have a grow-through grid made of circular wire that is supported by metal stakes. The wire grid supports the growing plant shoots as they fill out with fruit and leaves. Ring-style growth-through grids have the disadvantage that they cannot be removed without harming the plant.
  • 3. Tomato cage: Plant species other than tomatoes can also be supported by cages. Similar to ring-style supports, tomato cages function similarly, although they are often higher and have open tops. Plant cages offer 360 degrees of support and are perfect for young trees or popular tomato plants in vegetable gardens.
  • 4.Trellis: Consider constructing a trellis for your plant to climb against if it spreads out horizontally as it grows upward. Melons and zucchini, as well as pole beans, grow well next to wooden trellises and fences.

Need moss poles for Monsteras?

Although Monsteras can flourish without a moss pole, including one more closely resembles their natural habitat. As epiphytes, monsteras rely on the support of tree trunks to flourish. They cling by inserting their aerial roots into the structure’s framework. You may create a more natural growing environment for your Monstera indoors with the aid of a moss pole. By clicking the image or link, you can check the price on Amazon.

What can I do about my lanky Monstera?

Like all plants, a Monstera deliciosa can become sparse and lanky from a lack of sunshine. The issue itself is simple to identify, but how can you put a stop to it? How do you mend a Monstera that is “leggy” and what does that mean?

When a Monstera doesn’t receive enough light, it becomes leggy and becomes elongated and sparse. Once a leggy Monstera has been identified, it can be treated by cutting back the leggy growth and making sure the plant continues to receive enough sunshine going ahead.

It can be frightening whenever your plant starts to appear less than healthy. Leggy, fortunately, is a simple problem to resolve. So don’t be afraid! Continue reading to learn what the issue is, how to resolve it, what kind of light a Monstera requires, and how to accommodate Monsteras in low-light conditions.

Why are the stems on my Monstera bending?

The leaves and stems of a thirsty Monstera should droop or bend downward as a warning sign. It could also appear wilted.

But this is a simple problem to solve because after a decent watering, the plant should seem more vibrant again.

Every 7-8 days, I notice that my Monstera enjoys water. It’s time to water if the soil feels dry on your finger or 1-2 inches down.

Bending stems could also be an indication that your plant needs more support if it is still producing new stems, you can see a lot of new growth, and you know it is receiving enough water.

A simple solution is to bury a moss pole in the ground and direct the stems to begin growing upwards rather than outwards.

Check your pot’s size as well. Make sure the pot isn’t too huge if the plant is young. These plants may endure cramped conditions for a while before requiring repotting.

Additionally, a pot that is too large frequently necessitates overwatering because to the soil’s tendency to retain extra moisture. A young plant won’t enjoy these circumstances, too.

Additionally, excessive watering nearly invariably results in root rot, which serves as a haven for fungus gnats (learn how to get rid of them).

How can a monstera be taught to scale a wall?

Your Monstera should be allowed to climb since it is not only natural for them but also looks fantastic! The majority of Monstera enthusiasts prefer to offer some sort of support for the plants, like a totem pole or pole covered in moss.

Monstera plants develop tendrils covered in aerial roots to aid in climbing. Monsteras’ aerial roots provide a variety of functions in addition to absorbing moisture and nutrients from the atmosphere. In the rainforest, they also cling to the rough surfaces of big trees to aid the Monstera vine’s ascent to the canopy—exactly what a moss pole may accomplish for your indoor plant.

Not all Monstera climb, though. In hanging pots or baskets, some kinds, such as Monstera adansonii, produce a stunning display. Additionally, they can be stacked on top of bookcases, filing cabinets, or even the refrigerator’s top and left to hang over the sides.

It is ultimately a matter of personal opinion whether you let your Monstera climb or decide to let the cascading vines fall freely.

To add some variation, teach some of your Monstera plants to climb while allowing others to trail from pots or baskets to display their eye-catching foliage. Or, to create a Monstera climbing wall, group many Monstera plants together and build a trellis (or latticework) against the wall.

How are Monstera guided?

  • Balance the sun’s and the shade’s intensity. The leaves of Monstera become yellow when exposed to excessive sunlight. The plant will display a condition known as negative phototropism, in which new leaves develop toward the darkness rather than the light, if kept in the dark. (It’s a really cunning trick: in the jungle, nighttime indicates the presence of a taller tree that Monstera can scale to reach the sun.) Indirect sunlight is preferable because this isn’t attainable in a living room.
  • Water Monstera once a week, evenly and moderately. Prior to adding more water, allow the soil to become somewhat dry. Keep in a relatively humid setting.
  • Avoid repotting too frequently and trim regularly by pinching off new growth to control excessive growth.

Scientists have proposed the following theories as to why Monstera leaves have holes: The ability to capture sunlight on the rainforest floor is increased, according to one idea, by this puncture. According to the other theory, it allows tropical downpours to pass through the leaves, preventing harm to the plant. This explains Hurricane Plant, another name for Monstera.

Note that some of our favorite indoor plants are native to the tropics. Check out Tropical Plants 101: A Guide to Planting, Care & Design for more information. More ideas for indoor plants can be found at:

How is Monstera trained?

You must fasten the Monstera to the moss pole once it is in the pot with the plant!

This will be a little simpler if your plant is still a young one. Tie the Monstera’s stem to the pole without pulling or bending excessively, making sure the nodes touch the wet moss. As a result, the aerial roots will be encouraged to encircle and grow into the moss pole.

This technique might need to be repeated whenever there is fresh growth. You can cut or loosen the ties once the aerial roots of the Monstera are securely fastened to the moss pole.

Your Monstera might not want to bend as much to attach to the moss pole if it is already pretty mature. This will require that you go extremely gently. Once the stem is up against the moss pole, tighten the ties every week to continue dragging it in that direction.

If the aerial roots of the Monstera are particularly lengthy, it can be beneficial for you to prune portions of them back. It will be more difficult to train them onto a support the longer they are. The aerial roots will generate more roots if you cut them close to the node; these roots will then develop into the moss pole.

Mist the Moss regularly.

The moss pole will draw the air roots of Monstera naturally, but only if it is moist. Regular misting of your moss pole will help your Monstera absorb extra moisture for its large, attractive leaves.

Use VELCRO garden tie.

VELCRO garden ties are a fantastic solution for securing your Monstera to the moss pole. There is no need to be concerned about tying a knot that will be strong enough because these plant ties attach to themselves. They are simple to put on and take off, and they won’t harm your Monstera’s stem.

The stems can also be attached to the moss pole using cable tie (zip tie). At least until the support begins to get hugged by the aerial roots. I performed this procedure on my Monstera Adansonii.

How is a sizable cheese plant supported?

Since cheese plants are epiphytes, they are vertically growing plants that rely on the support of surrounding plants. Therefore, growing cheese plants on a moss pole is a great imitation of how they naturally grow. For cheese plants, moss poles provide both the environment it requires to lift its heavy stem upright and an attractive aesthetic.

A sturdy stake that is a little bit taller than the plant is required. Cut a piece of fine mesh wire just big enough to wrap around the stake using wire snips. The wire mesh hoop around the wooden post is securely fastened with wood staples. Use sopped sphagnum moss to complete this cheese plant support. The moss should be pushed into the mesh to fill in the area around the stake.

Without the stake, you may easily create a Monstera moss pole by just filling a mesh tube with the moss and securing the edges, although I believe the stake increases the solidity. Philodendron stems can grow to be quite big and hefty.