How To Take A Monstera Cutting

You folks love talking about plants, so I’m starting to wonder what I’m doing here! It was essential that I set aside significant space on the site for it because there isn’t enough interior styling content, project updates, or clothing inspiration that I can share with you guys to compare to what occurs when I start talking about plants.

Let’s talk about one of the most fascinating indoor plants to maintain, the split leaf monstera, since substantial space is a concern.

Monsteras prefer indirect light that is moderately bright. Their leaves may become scorched by excessive direct sunlight. Mine is elevated off the ground in a south-facing window of our house to get the most indirect light.

The holes in the plant’s broad, emerald-green leaves are one of its most noticeable symptoms. Hence, the plant’s moniker, “Swiss cheese.” Monsteras grow holes in its leaves to allow more sunlight and rain to reach the remainder of the plant and its roots in their natural environments, which are the tropical jungle floors! However, not every monstera leaf will be punctured. This is a quality that the plant acquires as it gets older.

As they develop, monsteras resemble vines and have a propensity to climb the vertical surfaces surrounding them. Many plant owners enjoy giving them stake as they mature to promote their upward growth. Although I haven’t had to do this yet, as it develops, things could change.

Additionally, there are constantly numerous prospects for new growth because it spreads like a vine. Each new leaf’s end sprouts a new shoot that continues to grow. The vine forms a node after the new leaf emerges. These nodes eventually develop into aerial roots, which the plant uses to cling to and climb vertical surfaces in many, but not all, cases.

Developing a Monstera

My monstera is rather mature and in excellent health, so I have a lot of choices when it comes to choosing cuttings to reproduce. I can either cut a full cutting with 4-5 leaves and nodes on one vine, or I can cut several little cuttings with just 1-2 leaves and nodes. In this specific case, I chose the second course of action.

To avoid contaminating the parent or the cuttings when getting ready to take a cutting, make sure you have a clean knife or pair of sheers and that they are sharp. Before using, carefully wash with soap and water and perhaps even rub with a little rubbing alcohol.

How do you cut Monstera cuttings?

Stem cuttings are the preferred method of monstera propagation. Cuttings from Swiss cheese plants are simple to root. When using cuttings, you can either root them in water first or just bury them in the ground. Cuttings should be made immediately following a leaf node, with the bottom-most leaves removed.

Then, either partially bury the swiss cheese plant cuttings in the soil itself or root them in water for a few weeks before transplanting to a pot. There is no requirement for rooting hormone because they root so readily.

Can you plant a Monstera cutting straight into the ground?

Many people think that water propagation is the best or even the sole method for growing a new Monstera deliciosa from a cutting. However, a Monstera cutting can be grown in soil without first establishing the roots in water. Both approaches are effective, though many plant owners pick the approach they believe gives the most benefits.

It is simple to grow Monstera deliciosa from seed in soil. Simply take a healthy Monstera cutting with at least one node, and plant it into potting soil with good drainage. By using soil to root Monstera cuttings instead of water, the subsequent step of transferring the rooted cutting into soil is avoided.

People prefer to grow their plants in soil rather than water for a variety of reasons. Some people might discover that employing soil propagation is a simpler process or that their Monstera produces new growth more quickly. Some people have curious cats that won’t leave a water container alone. Additionally, some owners of indoor plants simply want to experiment with new methods of growing this well-liked plant.

Can I submerge a cutting of Monstera in water?

Allowing your cuttings to air dry for around 10 minutes after cleaning them is finished.

After that, gently set them in a jar and add water until it reaches the node by a few inches.

As this increases the likelihood of rot, try to keep the cutting hanging and away from the jar’s bottom or side.

I like to use vases like these, which have a broader base and a narrower mouth. This keeps the stem straight while giving the roots more room to spread out and thrive.

Put your jar somewhere bright and sunny (but avoid hot, direct sun). Your cutting will root more quickly in a sunny environment.

To maintain everything healthy and in the best growing conditions, you should ideally replace the water at least once every week.

In case there is any leftover decomposing plant waste, I also prefer to gently rinse off my roots when I change the water.

It’s not a great thing to let the water go longer if you forget to change it once a week, but you should be adding fresh water as you go.

How are Monstera cuttings rooted in water?

The Monstera deliciosa can be easily rooted in water, just as many other plants. In addition to creating a stunning display piece, water propagation is a reasonably simple method of growing numerous new Monsteras with little effort. A few simple tools, a lot of sunshine, and lots of time are all you need.

You must locate a region of the Monstera deliciosa plant that has a node if you want to root it in water. Place the cutting in water in a location with bright, indirect light after using sharp shears to remove the plant beneath the node. After a few weeks, the cutting’s tip should start to sprout roots.

There is much more to this process than what is described above, but this quick summary gives you a decent idea of how simple it is to grow a Monstera in water. The remainder of the essay will cover the specifics of rooting a Monstera in water, what to expect from a cutting that has been propagated in this manner, and some advantages and disadvantages of water propagation.

Where should I cut Monstera to spread it?

, you should separate each leaf and node on either side of the node/aerial root into independent segments.

The youngest leaf has a node that was still propagation-viable despite not having fully matured (you can kind of see it bumping through).

After you have separated your cuttings, you should remove any outdated sheathing from the leaf stems. When submerged in water for an extended period of time, they can decay and hinder the propagation process.

Your cuttings are now ready to go to their temporary residence. All you need is water and a vessel—I like clear ones.

It’s best to let the cuts to “heal” or dry up a little bit before immersing the cuttings in water. This only takes a little while.

The aerial root can be cut back, but I prefer to leave mine uncut. To make it sit comfortably at the bottom of my vessel, I simply delicately wrap it up.

The remaining stems are then arranged in the vessel, each one being spaced apart to allow for proper root development as well as aesthetic appeal once they are planted in soil. Due to their new root system, there isn’t much room to try to arrange them at that time.

Simply add water to completely cover the roots and ends once they are positioned how you like.

Place it somewhere bright, but not in the sun, and replace the water every three to five days. After roughly 2-3 weeks, roots should start to form!

In addition to new roots, it has also sprouted a huge number of new leaves.

Here is a picture of my very first effort at growing a monstera. I took the above steps, potted the cuttings in soil after around three months, and continued. It has thrived ever since I started watering it once a week!

Your inquiries are addressed:

Yes! Once they are in the proper light and receiving the appropriate amount of water, they are excellent for beginners and very simple to care for.

I plant them in a well-draining pot using ordinary Miracle Grow indoor potting soil. No need for moss or pearls.

Yes, to answer simply. That is a factor in the propagation process. I wouldn’t recommend making excessive or frequent cuts because you run the danger of harming the plant by putting it into shock.

It’s usually time for a new and larger pot when you can see the roots through the dirt or when you notice the growth has significantly halted.

All of my plants receive fertilizer during the growth season (April to September). I will fertilize every other week because I water them all once a week. I prefer liquid fertilizers (plant food) since I can regulate the amount that each plant receives.

In the summer, grocery stores like Kroger or your neighborhood Lowe’s or Home Depot may stock them. It’s always a good idea to check for nearby and online nurseries, such as

How long does a Monstera cutting take to take root?

After 3-5 weeks, the roots from your cuttings should start to grow. The new roots should be at least an inch long; this is the primary thing you want to check for. Your cutting is prepared to be planted into a pot once it develops several roots that size.

Expect no new leaf growth.

Monstera plants cannot develop from a single leaf cutting, unlike certain other plants like Sansevieria (Snake plant) and cactus.

Monstera plants grown without nodes will, regrettably, be unable to produce new leaf growth.

It lacks the tissue needed for cell division and the development of new leaves.

The leaf can survive without a node.

To keep turgid and fresh, the leaf will continue to absorb water by osmosis.

However, it must be situated in the optimal climate to prevent overheating and excessive transpiration, which would cause the leaf to wither.

Can a Monstera leaf be rooted without a node?

I adore how easy it is to spread a Monstera deliciosa. You may quickly fill your space with Monsteras or have a large number of baby plants to give to friends because they grow quickly from cuttings. Although nodes are suggested to be included on stem cuttings for propagation in online instructions, is this really necessary?

Can a Monstera be propagated without an A node? regrettably, no. Without a node, it is impossible to develop a Monstera deliciosa from a cutting. The components required to produce fresh growth are found in nodes. A Monstera leaf can withstand prolonged hydration and even develop roots, but only nodes can support new stem and leaf growth.

It can be tempting to try to grow a Monstera from a leaf, particularly if you accidentally snapped it off and want to try to save the fragment. But regrettably, it will never produce another plant. You will never have anything other than a leaf until the node is included. I’ll define a node in more detail below, along with the reasons cloning your Monstera is essential.

How soon should I trim Monstera plants?

Press gifts included the Arket planter, shovel, and vase. I get a little commission from the sales of the things when you click on affiliate links that are indicated with the symbol *aff. [All images by Cate St.

I should definitely preface this piece by saying that I’m not an expert on caring for houseplants. Even though I’ve done some reading and research, I believe that a large portion of my success with plants has been luck and a south-facing space. Although I’ve had a bad history of keeping plants alive, I’ve found the monstera deliciosa to be quite foolproof for those with less than stellar green thumbs.

The monstera is a native to the tropical jungles of Mexico; it prefers direct, strong sunlight and can withstand temperatures averaging between 18 and 25 °C. The monstera, also referred to as a Swiss cheese plant, can be identified by its broad, heart-shaped leaves and their characteristic perforated pattern. With its sculptural, leathery fronds, a monstera plant will provide a room with an unmatched, bold punch of lush foliage. Although the monstera shape has been employed as a popular theme on everything from bedding to wallpaper in the world of interior design, I really like the real thing.

My monstera plant has been contently resting in a corner and only occasionally needing water (about once a week). In only under two years, it went from being a tiny pot plant to a lush, towering tangle of stalks and glossy foliage. If you were sitting on the end of the sofa closest to the monster, it started to seem a little bit like you were sheltering under a forest canopy. It makes sense that its Latin name, monstrosa, which relates to the edible fruit it can produce, translates as “monstrous.” In the correct circumstances, these people can reach heights of almost 9 meters quickly.

Because of their quick growth and hardiness, monsteras are the perfect plant for propagation, which involves taking cuttings from a mature mother plant to produce smaller, new plants. It has enabled me to add even more lovely greenery to the house and has given the older plant new vitality. I was inspired to try it after seeing Siobhan Watts do it on Instagram. It couldn’t be simpler!

The spring and summer seasons, when a monstera plant is actively growing, are the optimum times to propagate it. When the gnarly roots from the stems start to grow outside the pot, that’s when you’ll know your monstera plant is ready for multiplication. Propagation can help equalize your monstera, much like pruning a hedge, if it appears a little unbalanced due to excessive growth in one direction or if it becomes too tall and can no longer support itself. A moss pole can also be used to support a monstera plant, but it’s always wonderful to spread the joy of the outside inside, isn’t it?

Taking a stem cutting is the first step in monstera plant propagation. Don’t just randomly chop. As you can see in the example above, the stem has a lengthy root that was in the soil and a smaller, more delicate nodule where another root is beginning to take shape. Be sure to cut your stem below an aerial root or leaf node.

To boost the quantity of water it can absorb in the following stage, cut the stem at an angle.

After that, just put your cutting in a dry vase filled with water. To see the growth, I used a clear vase like this little, spherical vase (*aff), although I’m not sure if that was essential. Aerial root or node should be completely submerged in water. After that, keep an eye on it while keeping it out of direct sunlight.

The cutting on the mother plant is shown in the left image having been clipped, and the cutting in the right image has been placed in water for the first time.

A few weeks will pass before the first shoots appear. Keep in mind that while propagating can be a tedious procedure, the benefits are well worth the wait. Meanwhile, a monstera in a vase creates a lovely presentation. For months, I didn’t need to purchase fresh flowers!

I was cautioned about changing the water by someone on Instagram.

I suppose part of the nutrients must be kept in the cutting. I simply added some new water to top it off if the water level seemed a little low.

The monstera cutting was ready to be repotted into soil when it had a magnificent tangle of light-colored roots. Even with the cutting submerged in water, a fresh, vibrant green leaf had emerged.

From my favorite book, “The House of Plants,” Caro and Rose advise using a compost that contains worm castings, rock dust, and coir for important minerals as well as coir to retain moisture. I just used some garden compost because I didn’t really know where to start with any of stuff, but anything that provides your cutting the best start is a wonderful idea. At least the Kent & Stowe gardening trowel (*aff) makes me appear the part!

In compost, plant your cutting.

To aid it, you can apply a small amount of liquid fertilizer. To aid in draining, consider a pot with a hole at the bottom, such as this grey terracotta plant pot from Arket (*aff). Before adding soil, put stones, gravel, or potting grit at the bottom of your plant pot if it has a drainage hole. However, in my experience, plants that I’ve grown in pots without holes haven’t done well over time.

Make sure the monstera plant is standing erect and pat down the soil’s surface. After giving the plant some water, you’re done!

Now all I have to do is cross my fingers and hope that this plant, like the mummy plant, survives and grows.

When the top layer of soil has dried out, water your monstera plant once a week to keep it healthy. You may also spritz the plant occasionally to keep the leaves healthy and glossy or pour little water to the saucer to let the roots collect it there. In the event that the leaves become a little dusty, I will occasionally wipe them.

There we are, then

I was astounded by how simple it was to spread a monstera plant! What’s even great is that you may have an impact right away without spending any money or purchasing anything new. Why not try it if you have one that seems a touch overgrown?

I’m really enjoying adding more plants to my house and gradually raising something. It’s so rewarding to watch a plant grow and change rather than wither and perish only by looking at it. Plants not only serve to purify the air, but they also, in my opinion, make a place feel nice just by being there. They give a home life and a sense of vibrancy. And it’s oh so addictive if you find success with one plant!