How To Propagate Swiss Cheese Plant

Seeds, stem cuttings, or suckers can all be used to multiply the Swiss cheese vine plant, though cuttings and suckers are the more typical methods.

It is simple to take Swiss cheese plant cuttings if you are wondering how to do it. Simply take stem cuttings, leaving a portion of the stem attached, by cutting immediately after a leaf node, for this Swiss cheese plant multiplication. Trim the first leaf from the cutting’s base, then put the node in the ground. If you want to, you can apply rooting hormone, but it’s not required. Water thoroughly and let the water drain away. Ideally, you might wish to root the cutting in water first, then transfer it to a pot once rooting has sufficiently started. The Swiss cheese vine cutting should be rooted in water for two to three weeks before being transplanted to a container with nutrient-rich potting soil.

Additionally, you can grow Swiss cheese plants by wrapping wet moss around the stem at a tiny aerial root and leaf axil and securing it with twine. Place this area into a transparent bag and secure the top (adding a few small air vents). The Swiss cheese vine plant should start to grow new roots in a few months.

How is a Swiss cheese plant split?

The plant should be unpotted and turned over. If you see any natural divisions in the plant’s crown, this is where the divisions should be made. Slice into the root ball using a sharp knife, making sure that each chunk has a bit of the crown and roots. each division a pot.

How long does it take a Swiss cheese plant to multiply?

Finding the ideal location for your Swiss cheese plant is crucial. The leaves will scorch under too much direct sunlight. If there is too much shade, the leaves won’t pierce. The best location is near a window in good lighting and is only a few feet away. Avoid placing it close to a radiator or an air conditioner. Give it plenty of space because it will become extremely big.

Swiss cheese plants can survive in temperatures as low as 10C but will only thrive in temps over 18C.

How to plant a Swiss cheese plant

Plant in a large, drainage-holed pot with peat-free, all-purpose, or house plant compost inside of it. Around the root ball, there should be at least 1 inch of compost.

Caring for a Swiss cheese plant

Swiss cheese plants require little maintenance. The time of year and the environment in the space will determine how frequently you should water your Swiss cheese plant. Instead of watering according to a schedule, water anytime the compost’s top inch or two are dry. Make sure to let all of the water run off after that. Wintertime plants require less watering, especially if they are kept in a cool environment. In the spring and summer, give the plant a monthly feeding with a house plant food.

The stems of the plant must be tied into a support, such as a moss or coir pole, as it develops and becomes floppy. These are available online or in garden centers.

Aerial roots, which are long, white roots that emerge from the plant’s stems, will also develop on the plant. These aid the plant in clinging to trees in the wild. Trimming the aerial roots off if you find them unsightly is OK because your plant will be obtaining its nutrition from the roots in the compost. To support the plant, you can also tuck them into the compost or let them climb the moss pole.

If the roots are starting to protrude from the pot, repot in the spring using plant compost or all-purpose compost. Scoop up as much of the compost from the top of the pot as you can and replace it with fresh material if the plant grows too large for you to handle it comfortably.

To keep them looking glossy and to aid in the plant’s ability to breathe, occasionally wipe the large leaves with a damp cloth. Your plant will benefit from a sprinkling of its leaves if it is in a warm environment.

How to propagate a Swiss cheese plant

Taking cuttings from a Swiss cheese plant is simple. Choose a stem in the spring or early summer that has an aerial root starting to grow further down. Look for a white or brown bud next to a leaf. This will serve as the new roots. Make a cut that is about an inch below the aerial root with a sharp knife or secateurs. Check to make sure the aerial root is immersed before placing the stem in a clear, deep container with a few inches of water. Place in a well-lit area away from the sun and replace the water every few days. Within a week or two, new roots should begin to emerge. The cutting should have developed a respectable bundle of new roots that are about four inches long after about six weeks. You can now put the new plant in a pot filled with fresh, all-purpose, or house plant compost. water, allowing any extra to drain.

Growing Swiss cheese plants: problem-solving

If the leaves on your Swiss cheese plant aren’t perforating, they might still be young; it’s common for a plant to have both cut and uncut leaves. Move to a brighter area if the larger leaves are not perforating because of a lack of light.

You have overwatered your Swiss cheese plant and the compost is too wet if it is “weeping” or has “tears” of water at the borders of its leaves. Water only when the soil starts to dry out, and allow any extra water drain away. Make sure the compost is just damp, not sopping wet.

Yellow leaves may indicate overwatering, particularly if they are also wilting. It might also indicate that the plant needs to be fed.

Brown blotches on the leaves are probably the result of sunburn. Remove the plant from the sun’s direct rays.

Wilting leaves may indicate either inadequate or excessive irrigation. The plant needs water if the compost is starting to dry out. If it is soaked, you overwatered; let the soil air-dry. It may also indicate that the plant’s roots are becoming clogged and unable to absorb water. It’s time to plant it into a larger container if roots start to protrude from the bottom of the current one.

The simplest technique to fix a plant that has grown too large or out of shape is to prune it by removing some stems from the base. Because the sap may be harmful, wear gloves. Take a clipping or two instead, and give the original plant to someone with more room in their house.

Mealybugs might cause issues.

Watch out for insects on the undersides of leaves that resemble white, fluffy blobs. Use a cotton bud or moist towel dipped in a pesticide containing fatty acids or plant oils to wipe them off. Keep inspecting the leaves since mealybugs can be challenging to get rid of.

Scale insects, which are tiny, 6mm long, brown sap sucking insects, may also be seen. Remove using a cotton bud or piece of cloth dipped in a pesticide with fatty acids.

Can a Swiss cheese plant be rooted in water?

Stem cuttings are the preferred method of monstera propagation. Cuttings from Swiss cheese plants are simple to root. When using cuttings, you can either root them in water first or just bury them in the ground. Cuttings should be made immediately following a leaf node, with the bottom-most leaves removed.

Then, either partially bury the swiss cheese plant cuttings in the soil itself or root them in water for a few weeks before transplanting to a pot. There is no requirement for rooting hormone because they root so readily.

Where should I cut Monstera to spread it?

, you should separate each leaf and node on either side of the node/aerial root into independent segments.

The youngest leaf has a node that was still propagation-viable despite not having fully matured (you can kind of see it bumping through).

After you have separated your cuttings, you should remove any outdated sheathing from the leaf stems. When submerged in water for an extended period of time, they can decay and hinder the propagation process.

Your cuttings are now ready to go to their temporary residence. All you need is water and a vessel—I like clear ones.

It’s best to let the cuts to “heal” or dry up a little bit before immersing the cuttings in water. This only takes a little while.

The aerial root can be cut back, but I prefer to leave mine uncut. To make it sit comfortably at the bottom of my vessel, I simply delicately wrap it up.

The remaining stems are then arranged in the vessel, each one being spaced apart to allow for proper root development as well as aesthetic appeal once they are planted in soil. Due to their new root system, there isn’t much room to try to arrange them at that time.

Simply add water to completely cover the roots and ends once they are positioned how you like.

Place it somewhere bright, but not in the sun, and replace the water every three to five days. After roughly 2-3 weeks, roots should start to form!

In addition to new roots, it has also sprouted a huge number of new leaves.

Here is a picture of my very first effort at growing a monstera. I took the above steps, potted the cuttings in soil after around three months, and continued. It has thrived ever since I started watering it once a week!

Your inquiries are addressed:

Yes! Once they are in the proper light and receiving the appropriate amount of water, they are excellent for beginners and very simple to care for.

I plant them in a well-draining pot using ordinary Miracle Grow indoor potting soil. No need for moss or pearls.

Yes, to answer simply. That is a factor in the propagation process. I wouldn’t recommend making excessive or frequent cuts because you run the danger of harming the plant by putting it into shock.

It’s usually time for a new and larger pot when you can see the roots through the dirt or when you notice the growth has significantly halted.

All of my plants receive fertilizer during the growth season (April to September). I will fertilize every other week because I water them all once a week. I prefer liquid fertilizers (plant food) since I can regulate the amount that each plant receives.

In the summer, grocery stores like Kroger or your neighborhood Lowe’s or Home Depot may stock them. It’s always a good idea to check for nearby and online nurseries, such as

Are Monstera and Swiss cheese plant the same thing?

This is when things start to get a little tricky! Monstera is the name of the plant genus, however numerous different species of Monstera share the common name “Swiss cheese plant.” Monstera deliciosa, which has long-lobed leaves and elongated holes, is the most common species (though young leaves may not have these holes). Another related plant, Monstera epipremnoides, has essentially identical appearance, with the exception that its leaves have long slashes rather than holes along the edges. And Monstera adansonii has leaves with holes in the shape of hearts. Whichever species you choose to purchase, they are all lovely, low-maintenance plants with comparable requirements.

How is a Swiss cheese made bushy?

You must provide it with something to climb. The most typical alternative to moss poles is a wooden or metal trellis, although other options include bamboo stakes, bits of wood or bark, metal or wooden trellises, and topiary forms. Or, like I did, you may make your own trellis!

You need a support strategy, such as the ones mentioned above, and something to fasten the stems to. The support you select and the desired aesthetic will both affect how you train it. I want to climb on half of mine and trail on the other.

To secure it to the support, use twine, string, or a tie of some sort. It doesn’t cling on on its own. You might be able to weave it in and out to achieve the desired look, but I’ve always found that adding one or two ties—or even more—allows the stems to face and develop in the desired directions.

There were just two long stems left on my Swiss Cheese Vine at this point. One more will be trained to climb the trellis, and the others will trail.

Pruning is used to achieve this. Tip trimming will work to maintain your plant bushy if you start doing it sooner. You can propagate it using the stem cutting method in water or a light soil mixture and replant it if it is too lanky.

No, although a lot of people do, particularly when using a Monstera delicosa. You might use a less “robust choice” like I did because the Monstera adansonii stems are significantly thinner.

Within the next few months, you’ll receive a care post on this lovely, quickly expanding plant. And now that you know how to train a Monstera adansonii, you can do so!

Can You Propagate a Leaf Without a Node?

Simply put, no. For your cutting to produce new leaves, it MUST have a node.

You’ve certainly drooled over stunning images of a single monstera leaf in a lovely glass vase of clear water on Instagram and in home décor magazines.

The bad news is that even while a leaf without a node might develop some roots, it will still only be a leaf with roots. It won’t develop into a new monstera plant with stalks or additional leaves. There will never be more than one leaf.

The node is essential for propagation since it stores all of the genetic data required to develop a new plant.

Do All Monstera Leaves Have Nodes?

Nodes are little bumps that develop on the side of your monstera’s stem that is not covered by a leaf, not even on the stems of the leaves.

Your monstera’s vine develops nodes. In fact, because it hasn’t matured sufficiently, a young monstera may not have any nodes yet. Your monstera may not yet be mature enough to propagate from cuttings if it appears as though leaves are sprouting directly out of the soil. (However, if it’s big enough, you might be able to propagate it using separation!)

Most of your plant’s leaves will be accompanied by a node on the other side of the stem once it begins to vine.

Can You Propagate Leafless Nodes?

So, while you CANNOT propagate a node without a leaf, you CAN propagate a leaf without a node!

Online vendors may provide leafless, unrooted nodes for sale. But the success rate won’t be as high as when you propagate cuttings with one or two leaves.