How Much Sun Should A Monstera Get

Monsteras typically require 5 to 8 hours of bright indirect light every day to flourish. More light is required to bring out the stunning coloring of variegated species, such as the Thai Constellation Monstera deliciosa or Variegatta Monstera deliciosa.

Is the sun getting too much on my Monstera?

  • Balance the sun’s and the shade’s intensity. The leaves of Monstera become yellow when exposed to excessive sunlight. The plant will display a condition known as negative phototropism, in which new leaves develop toward the darkness rather than the light, if kept in the dark. (It’s a really cunning trick: in the jungle, nighttime indicates the presence of a taller tree that Monstera can scale to reach the sun.) Indirect sunlight is preferable because this isn’t attainable in a living room.
  • Water Monstera once a week, evenly and moderately. Prior to adding more water, allow the soil to become somewhat dry. Keep in a relatively humid setting.
  • Avoid repotting too frequently and trim regularly by pinching off new growth to control excessive growth.

Scientists have proposed the following theories as to why Monstera leaves have holes: The ability to capture sunlight on the rainforest floor is increased, according to one idea, by this puncture. According to the other theory, it allows tropical downpours to pass through the leaves, preventing harm to the plant. This explains Hurricane Plant, another name for Monstera.

Note that some of our favorite indoor plants are native to the tropics. Check out Tropical Plants 101: A Guide to Planting, Care & Design for more information. More ideas for indoor plants can be found at:

Sign #1: Your monstera may need more light if the leaves won’t split.

You should start to notice some fenestration, or splitting, in your leaves if your monstera is older than three years.

After all, the majority of us have them because it’s one of their most recognizable traits.

But for your monstera to achieve this, it needs light. Your monstera would be happier with more light if its adult leaves lacked holes.

Sign #2: If the monstera soil takes forever to dry out it may need more light.

A modest amount of water is needed by monsteras, however they dislike having damp roots. When the top inch or two of soil feel dry to the touch, you should water. (Dig a finger into the ground. Give your plant a drink if the soil is dry to the second knuckle!

Your monstera uses water more effectively while it is in the sun, but when it is dark, the soil might stay wet for a lot longer than is good for the roots.

If you’re giving your plant additional light in addition to changing the amount of water you give it if you’re going more than 10 days between waterings since the soil still feels moist. For your monstera, we advise using this potting mix (speaking about soil).

Sign #3: Give your monstera more light if you see leaf discoloration.

There could be a few things going on if you see dark brown spots or yellowing on your monstera’s leaves.

First, your plant probably receives too much water from you. However, as we discovered in the previous paragraph, because insufficient light prevents the soil from drying out, light and overwatering problems frequently coexist.

If reducing the amount of water you give your monstera doesn’t solve the issue, you might perhaps want to move it nearer a window or choose a window with more light overall.

Sign #4: If your monstera is growing slowly it may need more light.

It is commonly known that monsteras, particularly monstera deliciosa, can develop into… monsters!

In instance, Monstera deliciosa can expand up to 10 feet indoors, and it doesn’t take very long to do so.

It’s possible that your monstera isn’t getting enough light to provide the energy necessary to support new development if you find that it hasn’t gotten bigger or produced new leaves for a few months (especially during the spring or summer).

Do I need to spray my Monstera?

Monstera Deliciosas may tolerate low to high levels of indirect, dappled light. Their leaves may burn and scorch if exposed to direct sunlight for an extended period of time. Low light conditions will inhibit growth.

Make sure your Variegated Monstera Deliciosa gets enough of bright indirect light if you have one.

Water

You should spritz your Monstera Deliciosa frequently and water it once a week. In the winter, when you may only need to water your plant every two weeks, let the soil dry up in between waterings.

Humidity

Because Monstera Deliciosa prefers a humid atmosphere, we advise often wetting its leaves. To boost the humidity of the air around your plant, you might also place it close to other plants.

Additional care information

From a stem and leaf cutting, you may quickly reproduce your monstera deliciosa in water. Make sure to make the cut just below a stem node.

The Monstera Deliciosa’s huge leaves are readily covered in dust over time. Use a moist towel to routinely wipe them.

Troubleshooting

Yellowing leaves may indicate that your Monstera Deliciosa has experienced moisture shock or has received too much light.

Browning leaves are a sign that your plant has been receiving insufficient light or has been exposed to low humidity.

Do I need to remove the sunburned Monstera leaves?

Your Monstera should have any damaged leaves removed. Trimming dead leaves helps your plant’s health in addition to improving its appearance.

  • Unable to photosynthesize are dead leaves. Any brown or black areas on your Monstera’s leaves are no longer able to supply the plant with energy.
  • Dead leaf sections have no protection against rot and infection in comparison to healthy leaves. Dead plant cells provide nutrients that are consumed by bacteria and fungi. For instance, you can notice mold growing on dead leaves that have been left on the plant or in the soil. To help defend the remainder of the plant against these diseases, remove any dark or damaged tissue.

It is possible that only the ripped edge of a leaf will become brown to seal a cut if there is only very minimal damage, such as accidently ripping or torn a portion of the leaf. Leave minor imperfections alone if they don’t affect other parts of the plant or interfere with your pleasure of the plant’s aesthetics.

Monstera damage to the roots and stems can be more serious than damage to the leaves because it prevents the plant from transporting water and nutrients. Visit our soon-to-be-available guides on stem damage and root rot.

What qualifies as strong ambient light?

In conclusion, brilliant indirect light is bright enough to read by and to cast a shadow, though not a dark, distinct one. It can be found a few feet away from south- or west-facing windows that are not sheltered, as well as close to windows that face north and east. Additionally, it can be produced by placing plants on windows that receive direct sunlight and diffusing sheer white curtains—the kind you can see through—between the glass panes.

In rooms or corridors without windows or if plants are placed in corners more than 5 feet from windows, bright adequate light for houseplants is probably not going to be present. You can use fluorescent or LED grow lights to produce bright, indirect light for such locations.

The best way to create bright, indirect light for your plants is by using your windows and the direction of the sun throughout the day.

Your windows’ orientation and how clear they are of obstructions both affect how much light your plants receive. Remember that white walls will reflect more light to your plants than dark ones.

South-facing window: Place plants that demand bright, indirect light about 3 to 5 feet away from the window or far enough back that the sun’s rays never quite reach them if your south-facing window receives a lot of sun during the day and is not shaded by surrounding trees or buildings. You can set your plants as close to that window as you like, as long as the sheer drape stays between them and the glass, if that window is shaded or covered with a sheer curtain that diffuses light.

West-facing window: The same general guidelines that apply to unobstructed south-facing windows also apply to unobstructed west-facing windows, especially those that face southwest. It often receives midday sunshine that is hotter and brighter than that coming through an east-facing window. You should therefore situate your plants 3 to 5 feet away from the window panes in these westward-pointing windows as well, or arrange a sheer screen between them and the window.

Unshaded east-facing windows receive direct morning sunshine, but the morning sun’s rays are softer than those of the afternoon sun. Therefore, a diffusing drape is not necessary when placing most plants that like bright, indirect light near or even on the ledge of an east-facing window.

North-facing window: Because north-facing windows rarely get direct sunlight, you may normally put plants that love bright, indirect light on their windowsills, where they will get the most light that is available there. You could want to put a mirror opposite the window to reflect more of the light back at the plants because even that might not be enough illumination for them, especially during the winter. As an alternative, think about getting an LED or fluorescent grow light.

My Monstera plant is sobbing, why?

Guttation, often known as “sweating,” “weeping,” or “crying,” is a completely natural occurrence when liquid droplets develop on the tips or surface of healthy leaves. Although the droplets appear to be made of water, they are actually made of xylem sap, a mixture of extra water and minerals.

Although xylem sap is non-toxic and won’t damage your furniture or flooring, it can become very filthy if larger plants start gutting and dripping.

There are many causes of guttation. The majority of the time, it indicates that your plant has a little bit more water than it requires and manages to get rid of the extra. During the night, when plants often stop transpiring, root pressure will force moisture, chemicals, sugars, and other substances upward through a network of tiny channels known as the phloem. These tubes are attached to tiny cells that are located on the leaf’s surface. On the tips of your plant’s leaves, they expel the extra water and minerals, creating what resembles dewdrops or perspiration.

It’s also critical to understand that guttation and transpiration are two different processes. Transpiration is the process through which moisture or water leaves the plant as a vapor while it is hot outside. On the other hand, guttation is xylem sap that the plant itself secretes.

Some claim that stress or less-than-ideal growth conditions can also lead to guttation. There are numerous ways to stress out your Monstera, even if you are doing everything you can to ensure a happy plant. This includes a change in temperature, the size of the soil or pot, or even just the drive home from the plant nursery.

Some plants are more adept at adjusting to a new environment than others, and your Monstera may try to control its developing environment by gutting or leaking leaves.

Where should my Monstera plant be placed?

PRO HINT: Monsteras love to climb up vertical surfaces because they are climbing plants. Use pegs or moss sticks to direct your Monstera’s growth upward if you prefer it to grow tall rather than wide.

A tough and simple-to-care-for species of flowering plant native to southern Mexico and Panama called Monstera deliciosa is also known as the “Due to the distinctive growth of ridges and holes, or fenestrations, on its more mature leaves, the Swiss cheese plant is called that. The “The fruit that the plant produces in its native environment, which resembles a pineapple, gives the plant its deliciosa moniker.

A warm, humid environment with plenty of water and soft sunlight are preferred by monsteras. Put your Monstera in an area with indirect light that ranges from moderate to bright. Even though it can tolerate lower light levels, you can notice lanky growth as a result, so the optimum location is a few feet away from a window that faces the south, west, or east and provides brilliant indirect light.

We offer a guide on how to measure light in your environment if you are unclear of the lighting conditions in your house or place of business.

Only the most mature leaves of the Monstera typically develop the distinctive splits, and even so, only under optimal circumstances. Just wait if yours has plenty of light but no splits.

Does Monstera prefer large pots?

Unquestionably, one of the most well-known indoor plants in history is the monstera deliciosa. The characteristic leaves are frequently seen in movies, video games, and printed on at least three pillows at your neighborhood home goods store. In addition to being a true fashion classic, it is also a very resilient and adaptable plant. We delve into the requirements for caring for this plant in this article.

Other names for Monstera deliciosa include “fruit salad plant,” “elephant ear plant,” and “swiss cheese plant.”

When should I water my Monstera deliciosa?

During the warmer months of the year, wait until the soil has dried to at least 50% of its depth. Allow the soil to totally dry up before watering in the winter.

How much light does a Monstera need?

Although they can withstand medium to low light, monstera prefer bright light. A decent test is a room with enough light to read a book by. They will develop more quickly and larger the more light they receive.

When should I fertilize my Monstera?

Mid-Spring to mid-Autumn, apply a liquid fertilizer every other time you water. You can fertilize your plants every time you water them if they are growing quickly in the summer. Fertilize not during the winter.

Should I re-pot my Monstera?

The majority of indoor plants are content to grow in small containers and will even profit from being somewhat root-bound. There is never a rush to increase the size of your pot until all the soil has had roots grow through it, just an inch or two.

Light

It is preferable to place your Monstera in the brightest area possible when it is cultivated indoors. A excellent place to start is with enough natural light to comfortably read a book. Make sure your plant doesn’t receive too much afternoon sun in the summer to avoid burning it. Even while a location may be ideal throughout the year, on a day with a temperature of +40°C, the heat and light may be too much for the plant to take.

Monstera may thrive in low-light conditions, however the smaller the leaves are, the less fenestration there will be to grow.

Fenestration refers to the distinctive holes that make a monstera leaf so simple to recognize. Faster growth, bigger leaves, and more fenestration will occur as a result of increased light levels.

Watering

The majority of indoor plants are vulnerable to overwatering. During warm weather, we advise you to water this plant just after the top half of the soil has dried out. Try to let the soil dry up almost completely over the winter.

Depending on the time of year, the location of the plant, and the flow of air, this will take two to four weeks. Please be aware that this is the shortest length of time you can wait; especially in the winter, you can wait much longer!

In severe circumstances, overwatering this plant can cause root rot, darkened leaf tips, and even plant death. However, if you skip watering for a week or two, the plant may not even notice or may simply wilt, giving you a very clear indication that it’s time to water.

As a plant with a potential for rapid growth, monstera will undoubtedly profit from routine applications of liquid fertilizer. Every second cycle of watering throughout the warmer months of the year—spring and summer—can include some fertilizer. If your plant continues to develop during the winter, you could consider reducing the intensity of your fertilizer and using it less frequently.

Although products made from seaweed, like Seasol, are low in the essential elements for development (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium), they are excellent soil conditioners and helpful for avoiding hydrophobia and pot shock.

Repotting

Monstera enjoy being crammed within their containers. Regardless of the size of the pot, they will grow enormous. Your monstera won’t grow any bigger or faster if you put it in a big pot; most likely, all the extra damp soil will cause root rot, or your monstera will focus more energy on growing roots than leaves. It is preferable to concentrate more on a pot that complements your aesthetic while repotting and to use that pot for a few years.

It’s better to repot during the warmer months of the year if you do decide to do so. Be cautious to plant it in a container with sufficient drainage (at least one big drainage hole). The soil may dry up a little bit quicker if you choose to use a porous terracotta pot, which can be quite beneficial in preventing over-watering. A premium potting mix is an excellent place to start, but a cacti/succulent mix or even chunky orchid mix works great to help with drainage. Monstera flourish in a well-draining potting mix.

Propagation

After a year or two, Monstera deliciosa’s size as a vine can become painfully obvious. This plant will spread across the ground and climb trees in the wild. You might need to stake the plant as it gets bigger in order to sustain this sprawling epiphyte and keep it standing erect. You can take a clip from the lead portion of the stem if you think the plant is getting too long. This will stop the stem’s growth and promote new shoots to emerge from the lowest parts of the plant.

The cutting can either be submerged in water or planted in wet ground. A node should be present on the stem of your stem cutting for about one inch. If the cutting already has an aerial root, it will grow considerably more quickly. Don’t worry if your cutting loses its leaves; they are not at all necessary because the stems can photosynthesise.

Common Problems

Overwatering is the most frequent problem that you may encounter. This will result in wilting, root rot, blackened leaf tips, and frequently white mold on the soil. Check to see if your pot is emptying and if you are watering excessively. Once it is dried, stop watering it again! In extreme circumstances, you might replace the moist soil with dry soil or move the plant outside into a covered area to hasten the drying process. Simply wait. Although this plant is unbreakable, it will take some time. A lot of good airflow will be quite beneficial.

If your plant isn’t getting enough light, it will grow long, lanky, and floppy to help it reach a potential light source. The internodes will be longer and the leaves will be more sparse. Stake the plant and/or relocate it to a more sunny area. It must be a permanent shift; periodically moving the plant into a light area would not work.

The most frequent pests are mealybugs, scale, and gnat flies, but I have never found M. deliciosa to be particularly vulnerable to insect invasion. The best course of action is to manually remove them to halt the spread right away, and then obtain a solution like neem oil, which will eradicate a variety of unpleasant creatures while being extremely safe and non-toxic.

Outdoors Care

When Monstera is outdoors, it is ideal to keep it in a semi-sheltered area. Try to locate a location where they are protected from the wind, frost, and hot afternoon sun. It should be mentioned that Monstera deliciosado does not need warm temperatures or high humidity. Although they will develop more quickly in the warmth, they can stay outside throughout winter in Melbourne. They will benefit much from the morning sun, which is completely OK.

This is the ideal place to start if you’re looking for a plant for your balcony or courtyard. This plant will grow quickly thanks to the additional bright light and the great airflow. Increased airflow around the plant will help to lower the risk of overwatering and the likelihood that viruses may infect the plants. I’ve discovered that in this posture, the leaves will also grow bigger and have more fenestration. You’re welcome to plant one right away in a garden bed!