Why Have Succulents

Recent research have revealed additional advantages of having these plants in the workplace. The plants tend to improve focus, concentration, and productivity at work in addition to adding a touch of beauty. We could all use a boost in those qualities.

Succulents grown inside also produce oxygen, which enhances the benefits to human health and air quality.

What advantages do succulents offer?

Here are seven benefits of growing succulents in your house:

  • In every climate, they may enliven a house.
  • They could aid in air filtration.
  • Your home’s humidity is improved by them.
  • They can improve the air quality in your environment.
  • They can help you focus better.
  • They can make you more tolerant of pain.
  • They Strengthen Memory

Are succulents suitable for indoor use?

Consider succulents if you desire for indoor greenery but have had trouble growing houseplants. They make pleasant house visitors and can easily endure interior circumstances.

They have unique characteristics that help them thrive in dry indoor conditions.

expanded roots, thick stems, or fleshy leaves that enable plants to store water. Cacti, which are a kind of succulent, are well known to the majority of people. But a variety of other plants grown primarily for their eye-catching foliage also belong to the succulent family.

Succulents have remarkable textures and strong, angular leaf shapes that make them become living sculptures for interior spaces. They are excellent indoor plants since they can thrive in dry environments. Many houseplants do not thrive because dwellings, especially in the winter, provide their inhabitants with dry interior air. A houseplant’s enemy is low relative humidity. However, because they can store water, succulents can withstand dry air without suffering unpleasant consequences.

Learn how to take care of succulents inside and how to grow these low-maintenance plants.

Can I keep succulents in my bedroom?

  • They aid in breathing – While plants emit oxygen during the process of photosynthesis, most plants respire at night, generating carbon dioxide. Other plants, such as orchids and areca palms, in addition to succulents, continue to produce oxygen throughout the night. Keep these plants in your bedroom to get a better night’s sleep by breathing in more fresh air as you sleep.
  • Succulents, such as snake plants and aloe vera, are great in purifying the air and removing toxins. According to NASA studies, 87 percent of volatile organic molecules can be eliminated (VOC). Because VOCs like benzene and formaldehyde are present in rugs, cigarette smoke, grocery bags, books, and ink, these plants are especially useful in libraries and study spaces.
  • They aid in illness prevention. Plant water released into the sky accounts for roughly 10% of the moisture in the air. In your home, the same rule holds true: the more plants you have, especially in groups, the better your ability to increase the humidity and so reduce the likelihood of dry skin, colds, sore throats, and dry coughs. According to a research by Norway’s Agricultural University, offices with plants had sickness rates that were 60% lower. Environmental psychologist Tina Bringslimark explained to The Telegraph: “We looked into how many people reported taking self-reported sick days and contrasted that with how many plants they could see from their desk. The more plants they could view, then the less self-reported sick leave there was”.
  • They aid in concentration – Numerous research on both students and workers have discovered that having plants around while studying or working improves concentration, attentiveness, and cognitive capacities. According to a University of Michigan research, the presence of plants increased memory retention by as much as 20%. Small plants like succulents, which don’t take up much space on your desk, are particularly helpful at the office.
  • They promote faster healing – Succulents can help to lessen coughs, fevers, headaches, and flu-like symptoms. Hospital patients who had plants in their rooms needed less pain medication, had lower blood pressure and heart rates, and were less worn out and anxious, according to Kansas State University researchers.

Succulents purify the air?

Fortunately, if you keep succulent plants, you’re already purifying your air. Succulent plants can assist with toxin removal, better airflow, and humidification of dry indoor air.

Do succulents draw insects?

Although succulents are hardy plants that thrive readily and are largely resistant to bugs, this does not mean that they are completely free from pests. Most common household insects are not an issue, but certain tiny bugs are drawn to succulents because of their abundant water supply. Here are some typical pests to watch out for when taking care of your succulent plants.

Mealybugs

These are the pests that are most frequently seen on succulents. They are tiny, looking somewhat like tiny crabs. Mealy bugs are evident if you see an odd white fuzz on the leaves and stem of your plant, even if you are unaware that you have them.

Even while you may first just see a few, the population of them on your succulent can quickly grow. Up to 600 eggs can be laid by a female, and after they hatch, they will remain on your plant and suck all the water out of it. Damage from mealybugs to succulents can also promote the growth of mold and, in sufficiently high quantities, kill your plant.

Scale

Have any tiny, black bugs been spotted on your succulents? Then you might have a scaling issue. Scale insects have a hard body and like to consume the sap from succulent plants. Although there are more than a thousand different varieties of scale in all sizes, colors, and shapes, only two kinds of scale are drawn to succulents.

Scale insects can swiftly spiral out of hand, and before you know it, they’ll have completely covered a leaf and are ready to go on to other areas. Unfortunately, the easiest approach to get rid of this pest, which can be quite difficult to do, is frequently to pull off the leaf (or leaves) that the scale is attached to.

Spider Mites

Spider mites are widespread pests that can infest a wide variety of plants, most notably succulents. These bugs suck away the succulents’ sweet nectar because they adore it. Spider mites are a little, crimson bug that is difficult to see because it is an arachnid.

Small white webs on plants are people’s first clue that they have spider mites. If you notice this, take immediate action to remove the web, preferably far from your other plants. Additionally, they leave behind tiny rust-colored dots where they have been feeding. Your plants may become weaker as a result of this damage, which could also spread additional illnesses.

Gnats

Despite the fact that gnats might not be as bad for your succulents as some of the other pests on our list, they can still be a major pain when taking care of indoor plants. These little, black, flying insects are well known to us all, and while they can be pesky enough on their own, having them constantly in your terrarium or buzzing around your succulents can drive you crazy.

Avoid overwatering your succulents since this is the best defense against gnats. Because these plants can withstand drought, overwatering them can cause root rot and a fungus that attracts gnats. This is crucial because the little black bugs on your succulent breed in enormous numbers, which not only makes them appear disgusting but also damages the leaves since they burrow into them.

Where should succulents be placed?

Succulents thrive in hot, arid conditions and don’t mind a little neglect due to their unique capacity to store water. They are therefore ideally suited to growing indoors and are the perfect choice for anyone looking for low-maintenance houseplants. Follow these instructions for successful plant care if you’re choosing succulents for the first time.

Select a succulent that will thrive in your indoor environment.

The majority of succulents need direct sunshine, however if your home only has a shady area, choose low light-tolerant plants like mother-in-tongue. law’s A trailing variety, like string of bananas, is an excellent option if you intend to grow your succulent in a hanging planter. To learn about your succulents’ requirements for sunlight, size, and spread, always read the plant labels.

Give the plants a good draining potting material.

You should repot your succulent as soon as you get it home since nurseries always plant their succulents in soil that is overly rich and holds too much moisture. A coarse potting mix with sufficient drainage and aeration is a good place to start. You can use an African violet mix or unique cactus and succulent mixtures that you can purchase at the nursery. Add perlite or pumice to the cactus or African violet mix (up to 50% of the total potting mix, depending on your particular succulent’s moisture requirements) to further increase drainage and prevent compaction. To make sure the mixture is moist throughout, always moisten it before using.

Decide on a container.

When repotting, use a container that is at least 1 to 2 inches bigger than the nursery container and has a drainage hole. Avoid using glass containers (such mason jars or terrariums) for long-term potting since they prevent roots from breathing and over time may result in root rot. Place your plant inside the container and backfill with extra pre-moistened potting mix after filling the bottom one-third of the container with pre-moistened potting mix.

Put the succulent plant in a pot somewhere sunny.

Try to arrange your succulents close to a south or east-facing window because most succulents need at least six hours of sun each day. Insufficient sunlight may cause your succulents to become spindly or to extend toward the light.

Between waterings, allow the potting mix to dry out.

Overwatering succulents is the most common error people make with them. Watering more deeply but less frequently is preferable. Before the next watering, completely saturate the potting mix (while making sure the water drains out of the drainage hole properly). The plant can finally perish if the potting soil is left moist every day.

Succulents should be fertilized at least once a year.

Fertilizer works best for plants in the spring (when the days lengthen and new growth starts) and again in the late summer. Use a water-soluble, balanced fertilizer (such as 8-8-8 or 10-10-10) that has been diluted to half the strength indicated on the container. Since succulents are semi-dormant in the winter, there is no need to nourish them. Because they are not actively growing, they do not require the nutrient boost.

Succulents are plants good fortune

People could achieve happiness and positive vibrations by balancing their energy with their environment, according to ancient Chinese mythology. This mythology is also the source of the notion that using plants can bring good luck. Feng shui is another name for the process of bringing energy into balance.

Planting succulents is one of the Feng Shui principles for good charm. Planting succulents is frequently connected with riches, success, and well-being in this culture. The prevalent belief that succulents bring luck in the Indo-China region is also due to the fact that this concept originated in China.

Before spreading over the globe, the Indo-China region was where succulents were most prevalent. In many parts of China, these plants are still in high demand around the time of the Chinese New Year. Succulents are widely available today. However, not everyone considers them to be lucky charms. Succulents and luck are not commonly associated in Western and North American cultures. But in China and the Sub-continent, this notion is still strong.

How frequently ought one to water succulents?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

Are succulents big oxygen emitters?

About two thirds of our body is oxygen. It is necessary for people to survive on this side of the planet. It energizes crucial bodily systems like breathing, brain activity, metabolism, and blood circulation.

When we breathe in, oxygen enters our bodies and carbon dioxide is expelled. Succulents and other plants also go through same respiration process, but in the other direction. They release oxygen while absorbing the carbon dioxide that is present in the atmosphere. They use the carbon dioxide we provide them with during the day as an energy source for their photosynthesis, which is the mechanism by which they produce food.

Succulents acceptable in bathrooms?

Yes, you can put succulents in the bathroom, although some succulents will do better there than others, is the quick response to the topic.

The bathroom is frequently the last location people consider decorating with plants when they bring them inside.

This is so because restrooms typically feature high levels of humidity and little natural light. The majority of succulents, though not all of them, are naturally resilient and may flourish in normal toilet circumstances.

The finest succulent plants for bathrooms with indirect light, filtered light, or low light circumstances are those that enjoy partial to full shadow and high humidity.

Do succulents like humidity?

Some species of the very adaptable succulents, which don’t all enjoy humidity, can take in the excess moisture in the bathroom air and store it in their leaves and stems.

Do succulents require a window to grow?

Succulents are easily grown plants that are commonly available and suitable for apartment living. They don’t need a lot of light or attention, and the majority of kinds don’t take up much room.

“According to Nancy Silverman, president and owner of Plantscaping, succulents are the trendiest and most sought-after plants for interior gardening.

Succulents have thick, often angular, and geometrically shaped leaves. The succulent family, which includes cactus plants, is characterized by their spherical form and spine-covered exterior.

According to Silverman, succulents are very orderly, crisp, tidy, and fitted plants.

Their silhouettes seem lovely.

“According to Chris Murray, manager of perennials and annual plants at Gali’s Florist and Garden Center, growing any of the succulents and cacti is simple.

Native to arid areas with high daytime temperatures and low nighttime temperatures, “Succulents and cacti can withstand colder temperatures than most people realize, he added. They thrive in a wide variety of temperatures, from 55 to 85 degrees.

Cactus and succulents “are extremely resilient to low light. He said that they can survive without being close to a window. In fact, certain succulents may thrive in inside spaces devoid of windows or other sources of natural light.

“Succulents shouldn’t be placed next to glass that magnifies sunlight, on a radiator, or near a heater. Too close window placement might cause plants to burn in the sun.

In porous clay pots that can breathe, succulents thrive “According to Murray, succulents and cacti look good in clay pots and are popular with most people. Ceramic pots with glaze are also suitable for these plants.

Succulents are typically sold in plastic containers and can be found in florist shops, garden centers, grocery stores, and online.

“He suggested the plants may stay in the plastic planter they came in for around a year.”

They do not immediately require a larger pot because they have such a little root system.

He advised mixing gravel and sand into the soil before planting succulents. This kind of soil mixture will quickly absorb water, which will collect in the saucer or tray underneath the container.” The key, he explained, is drainage.

If you plan to grow succulents in a container without a drainage hole, add an additional layer of gravel to the bottom so that excess water can collect there without getting to the roots.

The word “succulent” means “juicy plants,” and refers to the succulents’ fleshy leaves, stems, and shallow root systems that store water.

Succulents should not be overwatered as this can cause them to decay. Depending on the size of the pot and the amount of light they receive, Silverman advised watering them every two to four weeks “They require less water as the light level drops.

She suggested giving the plants a good soak before draining any extra water from the saucer.

Before watering them again, be sure they have used up all of their water. She advised feeling the soil’s surface and dipping your finger into the pot to gauge its moisture content. “You should never want the soil’s surface to feel wet. Succulents dislike being submerged in water.

She advised using a soil probe to detect whether the plant needs extra moisture for beginners who are just starting to grow succulents. A core of soil is brought up by the probe when it is introduced into the pot and pushed back up. It is not necessary to re-water the plant if the dirt at the bottom of the pot is still damp.

Murray noted that succulents do not require heavy feeding. In the winter, they shouldn’t be fed at all.

He advised using the all-purpose plant food Jack’s Classic. He advised applying fertilizer only during the summer and diluting it by one-fourth each time you water the plants.

Several succulents were suggested for apartment growth by Murray and Silverman. Be aware that there are numerous variants of each of these plants.

Agaves can reach a height of eight to ten inches and have enormous, stiff rosettes of long, pointed leaves.

Aloes are the most often used succulents, according to Murray. Depending on the kind, their surface can range from being smooth to being spiky, and there are numerous color variations. Aloe plants are well known for their therapeutic benefits. Burns can be soothed and minor cuts can be helped to heal by applying the leaf gel.

“Cacti are popular with collectors, according to Silverman. They are used with caution in installations in plantscaping since they can be harmful to children and animals.” You risk contracting an illness if you slam your hand into a thorny cactus.

Identifying this time-honored favorite “Silverman called it a beautiful plant and noted its propensity to blossom again. “Because the blooms begin around Thanksgiving, the cactus should be given a new name. Root stems in water to propagate them, and then pot them in a tiny clay pot.

Echeverias are a constantly well-liked outdoor garden plant that resemble hens and chicks. The outer leaves expand in size relative to the inner ones. Silver to dark bronze are possible for the foliage. One kind of echeveria, called Pearl Echeveria, has elegant flower stalks that rise from the base of the plant and are topped with blossoms of various hues. Clip an offshoot to use as seed, then let it sit for a day or two to develop a callus before planting it.

The jade plant has thick, maroon-tinged, glossy green foliage. Around Christmas, mature plants will blossom with star-shaped flowers. Jade Plants need to be manicured, Silverman noted. The stems will snap if they are allowed to grow without being pruned. Any plant that is pruned will force new growth. Cut the stems off and let them sit out for a day or two till the ends die to propagate. After that, plant them in sandy soil and water them sparingly until they take root.

Mother-in-Tongue Law’s is a two to three foot tall plant that prefers a sunny location and needs minimal water. Rhizomes can be divided, or it can be reproduced by taking leaf cuttings.

According to Silverman, Superba, a shorter variant of Mother-in-Tongue, Law’s has leaves with black and gold stripes and leaves with black and yellow stripes.

According to Silverman, this plant thrives in apartments and has extremely glossy green leaves. “Its silhouette is gorgeous. Depending on the size of the pot, she advised watering the ZZ Plant every two to four weeks. Depending on the amount of area that is available, these plants can grow quite small or pretty enormous.

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