Why Are My Succulents Dying At The Bottom

Because most succulent species are not particularly cold hardy and most die if they experience temperatures below 50F (10C) for an extended period of time, most succulent are susceptible to frost damage. Succulents are adapted to living in hot and dry climates (Jade plants are native to Africa, and aloe vera plants are native to the Arabian peninsula).

The ideal temperature range for succulent growth is roughly 55F-80F (13C-27C), making them considerably better house plants.

When succulents are exposed to cold or even frost, the liquid that is contained inside the leaves freezes, causing the leaves and stems to turn brown or black and mushy.

Move your succulent to a room or part of your yard where the temperature is between 55F and 80F (13C and 27C). Make sure the leaves are not in direct touch with any windows, as these areas of the house can get much colder than the rest of the house. Reduce watering for the time being.

The harm from cold shouldn’t necessarily get worse in the short term once the succulent is in a more stable environment.

Wait until the mushy, cold-damaged portion of the succulent dries up and develops a callus if the leaves of the succulent feel gooey.

Cut the leaf back to below the damaged section once the mushy portion has dried out. Cold-damaged succulent areas normally do not recover, but if the damage is not too severe, the succulent plant can be preserved as a whole.

In order to avoid additional potential issues, you should only restart watering the succulent once the callus of the leaf cut has completely healed over. Cold damage increases the danger of root rot.

After being damaged by cold, succulents can ultimately produce new leaves and begin to regain their natural appearance, however it frequently takes a lot of patience.

Key Takeaways:

  • Overwatering and wet soil are the causes of succulent plants dying. The soil must completely dry up before watering succulents again because they are drought-tolerant plants. Succulent leaves rot from the roots when they are placed in moist soil.
  • Succulent leaves shrink and wilt owing to drought stress, overwatering, insufficient watering frequency, or soil that has baked hard and repels water from the surface. Succulents’ leaves are water reservoirs, and when the roots do not have access to enough moisture, the leaves wilt.
  • Transplant shock or wet soils are the causes of succulents dying after repotting. A sudden difference in the amount of light, soil, and moisture causes succulents to wither. Repotted succulents may not be able to survive the new soil’s excessive moisture retention, which will cause the leaves to turn yellow, brown, or black.
  • Because they are submerged or don’t receive enough sunshine, succulent leaves wither at the bottom. Succulents and succulents that are drought-stressed When a succulent receives excessive shadow, it diverts its energy toward protecting the top leaves, which causes the lower leaves to wither and fall off near the base of the plant.
  • Due to freezing temperatures and frost, the majority of succulents lose their leaves and die back. Succulents typically prefer temperatures between 55 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13C-27C). The moisture stores in the succulent plants’ leaves are harmed by freezing temperatures, which causes the plant to turn black and die.

What should you do if the succulent’s bottom is dying?

First and foremost, remember that losing leaves are a normal part of every plant’s life, including succulents. It’s not always the case that this indicates your succulent is dying or that you’re doing something incorrectly.

Your succulent is probably still healthy even if its lower leaves have dried out, but you might need to water it a little more frequently.

While the older leaves on your plant wither away as it grows, new leaves are produced. There is therefore no cause for concern if you just notice a few dry, crispy leaves at the bottom of the plant. This is entirely typical.

On the other hand, if the majority of the leaves on your succulents are drying up, that is a clue that it needs to be watered a little more frequently.

Simply pluck the dried leaves from the plant’s base and discard them if they begin to look unattractive. Keep your plant in its container when you remove the leaves to prevent disturbing the roots.

Only remove leaves that are completely dead or that fall off readily. To better illustrate what dead leaves on a healthy plant look like, I took the plant out of the pot and placed it here.

Why is the bottom of my succulent becoming brown?

  • Symptoms. Succulents’ leaves can become soft and mushy and become brown or black, but the intensity of the cold damage will determine the exact symptoms.
  • Causes. Although some succulent plants may endure a light frost, this is uncommon because most succulents are native to hot climes and normally suffer in temperatures lower than 50F (10C).

The majority of succulent types are not cold tolerant and will perish if left in temps below 50F (10C) for an extended period of time.

The majority of succulent species thrive in a standard room temperature environment, with a range of 55F-80F (13C-27C) being ideal for aloe vera.

Succulents’ leaves and stems may become mushy in texture and appear dark or black if they are subjected to chilly weather or even frost.

How to Revive Cold Damaged Succulents

Place your succulent in a location in your home or garden where the temperature is consistently between 55F and 80F (13C and 27C). Make sure that none of the leaves are directly in contact with windows, as these areas of the house can get much colder than the rest of the house. Reduce watering for the time being.

The cold damage should not likely worsen once the succulent is in a more stable environment.

Wait a few days, if not weeks, and the succulent’s mushy, cold-damaged section should dry out and callus over if the leaves feel gooey.

Cut the leaf back to below the injured section once the mushy portion has dried out. Cold-damaged succulent areas normally do not recover, but the succulent plant as a whole can recover.

The succulent can ultimately sprout new leaves and begin to regain its usual appearance after being damaged by the cold, but it takes a lot of persistence.

  • The most frequent cause of succulent death is root rot brought on by over watering and poorly draining soils. Plants that can withstand drought, succulents need the soil to dry out between waterings. A succulent that has mushy, brown, yellow, or black leaves is withering because the soil is excessively wet.
  • Overwatering or sunburn cause succulents to turn brown. Brown, mushy succulent leaves are a sign of excessive moisture around the roots. Due to a rapid rise in sunshine intensity, scorched-looking brown succulent leaves may be the result of sunburn.
  • Because of excessive moisture around the roots brought on by frequent watering, wet soils, or pots without drainage holes, succulent leaves turn yellow. The soil needs to dry out between waterings for succulents. Yellow and mushy succulent leaves may be a sign of root rot brought on by over watering.
  • If succulents are exposed to too much shade, they become tall and lanky. Succulent leaves grow tall in the direction of the strongest light since the majority of succulents need bright, indirect light or full sun. Tall succulent leaves can droop under their own weight and often have weaker, withering leaves at the base.
  • Due to inadequate or excessive watering, succulent plants experience drought stress, which causes their leaves to shrivel. As a means of survival, succulents store moisture in their leaves. Underwatering your succulent causes it to draw on the moisture reserves in the leaves, giving it a shriveled appearance.
  • Recreate the circumstances of the succulents’ natural environment by planting them in well-draining, rocky soil with the appropriate amount of sunshine, and watering them when the soil becomes dry. To preserve the succulent, take cuttings from healthy areas of the plant.

Why is my succulent’s bottom drooping?

If your succulent plant is drooping, there might be a few reasons why this is happening. Discover the causes of your succulents’ drooping, the reasons why succulent leaves droop, why a succulent droops after repotting, and how to fix it in this article.

Overwatering, freezing weather, underwatering, and rotting are the main causes of a succulent’s drooping. Succulents can also droop due to pests, illnesses, and abrupt weather changes.

Typical succulents ought to be firm, plump, and not etiolated. Additionally, succulent leaves must be full and not wilted or discolored.

What does a succulent look like when it is overwatered?

How can you tell if your succulent is getting too much water? You can usually determine if a succulent is being overwatered or underwatered by looking for telltale indications. A plant that has received too much water will have soft, mushy leaves.

The leaves would either turn translucent in color or appear lighter than they would on a healthy plant. A succulent that had received too much water would frequently lose leaves readily, even when only lightly handled. Usually, the lowest leaves are the ones to suffer first.

The plant will look to be unhealthy overall. When this occurs, the plant is either being overwatered, sitting in the incorrect soil that does not dry out quickly enough, or both.

Your plants are being overwatered if you have been giving them regular waterings or if you have been following a watering schedule regardless of how the plant appears.

On the other hand, a succulent that has been submerged will have withered, wrinkled, and deflated-looking leaves. The leaves will appear thin and flat. The entire plant will appear withered and dry.

The leaves of a good succulent plant should be thick and solid, not mushy or desiccated.

To learn more about this subject, visit my post titled “How To Tell If Your Succulent is Over or Under Watered,” in which I go into great length about how you may determine whether your succulent plant is being over or under watered.

This String of Pearls ‘Senecio Rowleyanus’ plant leaf is one that has been overwatered. If a succulent’s water storage capacity has been exceeded, it may physically burst from overwatering.

How can a succulent plant appear to be under-watered?

The appearance of the leaves is the best indicator of whether your succulent is being overwatered or overwatered. While an overwatered plant will have mushy, nearly translucent leaves, an underwatered plant will have wrinkly, shriveled up foliage.

These are the plainly visible warning signals that your succulent is being overwatered or underwatered. However, the signs are frequently difficult to read. A succulent that has been submerged in water may act similarly to a plant that has been overwatered.

And here is the part where most folks are perplexed. Other indicators can help you determine whether you are indeed overwatering or underwatering your plants.

Must I remove the dead leaves from my succulents?

One of the most enjoyable aspects of growing succulents, in our opinion, is getting to remove all the dried leaves from the area around your plant’s base. Most individuals find it to be quite calming and enjoyable since it is so enjoyable and genuinely healing.

Aside from that interesting fact, you should remove any dried leaves and blossoms for the sake of your plant’s health. You can maintain the happiness and health of your plants by carrying out this easy chore.

New growth, New plants, New Blooms

Energy can be recycled back into the plant by removing any spent, dried-up bloom stalks and dry leaves from your succulents. Doing so will allow your plant to create fresh growth, new blooms and sometimes new rosettes or pups. And who doesn’t desire succulents that are bigger and more numerous?

To remove, gently lift the plant’s healthy leaves, and then pull any dried-out leaves from beneath. They ought to be rather simple to remove. If they don’t, you can either leave them to dry out more or, if they are past their prime and unsightly, try to snap them off completely.

Good Air Flow

Humidity, wetness, and/or succulents make for a dangerous and occasionally lethal mix. You may provide your plants sufficient air circulation and make it easier for the soil to dry out by removing these dried leaves from beneath your plants. Removing these dried leaves will assist avoid the growth of rot, mildew, and/or illnesses, especially in humid or very rainy weather. Additionally, air circulation around the plant’s base is made possible by this procedure.

Less Pests

Succulents are susceptible to a wide range of pest attacks, just like most other plants. Getting rid of the dead leaves beneath your plant can also help deter pests. Little insects adore wet areas where they may hide and reproduce. A succulent’s compressed lower leaves are likely to retain moisture around the plant’s base, which will attract pests. Your plant has a higher chance of repelling these pests if you remove these leaves.

Another alluring nesting habitat for bugs, specifically aphids, can be bloom stalks. If you see that your blooms are starting to develop this bug problem, you can either completely remove the bloom stalk or treat the bloom with a mix of diluted rubbing alcohol and water. These bugs frequently spread disease to surrounding plants and flowers if the situation is left untreated. In order to remove bloom stalks from your plant, either gently wriggle the stalk back and forth or, if it hasn’t dried up yet, snap or cut it low.

Do we have any ASMR fans out there??

We made this little movie to demonstrate how to take these leaves off your plants, but since we adore succulents, it also serves as our take on ASMR. Am I correct?

(According to The Urban Dictionary, ASMR’s sole function is to help people unwind. The goal of ASMR videos is to relax the viewer by sending a tingling sensation down their spine or back.

How can you tell whether a succulent is well-watered or not?

Okay, so we’ve talked a lot about succulents that are dry, but what about those that have received too much water? Well, if you recall, overwatering essentially causes those particular balloon-like cells to overfill and burst, leading to damaged cell structures and rotting leaves and roots.

Discoloration and a change in the shape of the leaves are the first indications of overwatering to look out for. The leaves will turn transparent, floppy, and squishy, and unlike those that have been under-watered, they won’t be retrieved by the plant. It won’t be simple for succulents to recover from this state, but they can. Taking leaves and cuttings to root and grow new plants is an alternative to rescuing the overwatered succulent.