Where To Buy Succulents In Columbus Ohio

One of the simplest plants to grow in Northeast Ohio for enjoyment inside during the winter or outside during the summer are succulents. They make wonderful plants for both novice and seasoned “green thumbs” in the garden. Succulent plants are distinguished by their juicy stems or leaves, which serve as reservoirs for water and nutrients that enable them to survive in severe, arid environments.

The popular and prickly cacti belong to the succulent family and are distinguished by their cushioned growing points, or areoles. They produce their infamous spines here! A almost infallible plant that thrives in hot, sunny containers, dry, rock garden beds, or on a warm windowsill indoors, succulents come in a variety of shapes, colors, and variations.

When is the best time of year to buy succulents?

Although they enjoy the heat, succulents actually grow more slowly in the summer. It can be challenging for newcomers to water them during the intense summer heat.

Winter presents additional challenges for people who are new to cultivating succulents because the frigid temperatures can harm or even kill them.

You will discover that most places have a better selection and healthier plants if you shop for succulents in the warmer (but not the warmest) months because there is a higher turnover of them then and the supply is always fresh.

Succulents grow best in the spring and fall, so now is an excellent time to buy them. It offers you a chance to become accustomed to their care before the onset of either the extremely hot or extremely cold weather.

What are the succulents at Ace Hardware priced at?

another Davis resident Sue, whose garden I visited a month ago, gave me a call yesterday to inform me that our neighborhood Ace Hardware store had received a fresh shipment of succulents. Naturally, I had to see for myself, and I have to admit that these plants are attractive and diverse.

Our neighborhood Ace Hardware store purchases its succulents from Lone Pine Gardens, a tiny specialized grower in Sebastopol in Sonoma County, as opposed to big box stores like The Home Depot or Lowe’s. Their selections go far beyond the norm and frequently contain unusual, difficult-to-find plants.

Prices are quite affordable, averaging $1 per inch of pot size (plants in two pots cost $1.99, three pots cost $2.99, and four pots cost $4.29). Another key benefit is that the majority of plants come with plant tags, allowing you to know exactly what you’re purchasing.

Despite my efforts to be more cautious in my purchasing decisions—considering the number of plants I already own and the limited space I have—I couldn’t help but acquire three new additions, two of which are listed below.

Here are my most recent purchases:

If the echeverias post from yesterday whetted your appetite, I found some stunning 3 specimens at Ace:

How can I find affordable succulents?

When it comes to succulents if you don’t shop at the appropriate spot you run into troubles. Because succulents can be pricey, you don’t want to purchase a plant that is injured or infected. Success with succulents depends on knowing where to acquire them. After purchasing a starting set, you can learn how to re-grow your succulents so that you will always have an abundance of your own.

Ikea

Believe it or not, Ikea has a great selection of affordable succulents. They have sold me many succulents that had young succulents sprouting from the sides. BONUS! The plants have been strong and their pricing are excellent. One more good reason to love Ikea! Additionally, while you are there, look at their pots as well. They provide some extremely adorable and inexpensive solutions.

Amazon

What can’t you purchase on Amazon? It turns out that you can purchase some really awesome succulents on Amazon! You may have a vast selection of succulents delivered to your door for less than $2 per plant plus prime shipping. If you’re just getting started and unsure of which variety you want to work with, this is ideal!

The Succulent Source

I’ve only heard great things about the Succulent Source. The succulent selection at this family-owned business is incredible. Every conceivable size and shape. Even the youngsters help the succulents grow! I adore it. Go now and look them up.

Be sure to adhere to the care recommendations after you have your succulents. Check out these typical explanations for why your succulents are dying if you start to experience any problems. Also, if you manage to get your hands on one of those fantastic succulent species, check out this too-cute for words concept for an indoor succulent garden!

Succulents can they survive outside in Ohio?

Yes, it is the answer. Although certain succulents can withstand frost, they are frequently thought of as drought-tolerant plants. They flourish in chilly, snowy conditions, and the extreme cold even brings out their magnificent, vivid colors. They are referred to as “Hard Succulents.” Sempervivum, Sedum, and Euphorbias genera contain some of the most hardy succulents. You may plant such succulents outside all year round because the majority of them can withstand temperatures as low as -20F (Hardiness Zone 5).

“Soft Succulents” are another group of succulents that are more susceptible to frost. When the weather drops below freezing, they must be winterized inside.

Succulents: do they reappear annually?

Some succulents will thrive outside all year for you if you live in a climate with four seasons, particularly one with harsh winters, but most won’t.

Although most won’t endure prolonged frigid conditions, each succulent has varied temperature requirements.

But there is a whole class of gorgeous cold-tolerant plants that are largely ignored in the succulent world! Many people are unaware of their existence or how numerous they are.

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Even if your environment dips well below freezing for the majority of the winter, you may still keep a lovely succulent garden outdoors using Sempervivums, select Sedums, and their hardy Opuntia relatives.

I started off growing succulents in Utah, which has a Zone 5 environment. I didn’t know there were succulents that could endure snow, therefore I was primarily cultivating succulents indoors.

Fortunately, Mountain Crest Gardens was recommended to me, and as a result, my succulent garden underwent significant improvement. According to my knowledge, Mountain Crest Gardens is the main source of cold-tolerant succulent species.

Their nursery is really located in a mountain valley near Mount Shasta in northern California, where they receive snow all winter. They have the most exquisite assortment of succulents that can withstand chilly temperatures.

These Sempervivums, Sedums, and Opuntias (also known as “Prickly Pear Cactus”) are wonderful since they can also survive in more temperate climes!

In the video below, you can learn more about what succulents can withstand below-freezing temperatures:

I have many sizable pots full of Sempervivums and Sedums that made the journey and are now flourishing here in Arizona, in addition to the numerous plants I did plant in the ground for my parents in Utah. I also want to expand my collection here with some cold-tolerant Opuntia.

Sempervivums are significantly harder than other rosettes succulents, such Echeverias, and make excellent rosettes if you are unfamiliar with how these succulents look. The color choices are also quite beautiful, ranging from pinks, reds, and purples to greens, yellows, and blues. You truly receive the entire rainbow!

The resilient Sedums are more of a ground cover and come in a wide range of forms, textures, and hues. You’ll find that some of them generate a wonderful trailing effect over the edge of your succulent pots, which looks fantastic when combined with Sempervivums.

My eye has been particularly drawn to the tough Opuntia. I was able to visit the Waterwise Botanical Gardens in Escondido, California, when they introduced a line of cold-hard Opuntias a few years ago. The most stunning flowers you’ll ever see on a succulent are produced by these plants in the spring, despite the fact that they may look like regular “Prickly Pear” cactus on the outside.

Opuntia “Pina Colada,” which has a blossom that truly changes colors, was one of my all-time favorites. It changes from being an orangey-pink color to yellow with pink and orange stripes in the middle the following day.

The amazing thing is that these cold-tolerant Opuntias are now available on Mountain Crest Gardens’ website thanks to a collaboration between Mountain Crest Gardens and Waterwise Botanicals.

So everyone who lives somewhere with four seasons, don’t forget to think about these incredible succulents! You’ll find that being able to observe some color and life in the midst of winter is very satisfying, in my opinion. Nothing compares to the Opuntias blooming at the start of spring, though!

It’s fascinating to observe how these hardy plants recover with vibrant, gorgeous hues even after spending the winter months buried beneath several feet or inches of snow. My awe for succulents never wanes!

Succulent plants: how much are they?

Beautiful plants known as succulents can store water in a variety of forms, including leaves and stalks. Despite being mostly from the desert, they are becoming more and more popular in home décor because of their tolerance. You could be tempted to get one, but you’re unsure of their cost.

Succulents are typically inexpensive. However, the price of a succulent increases with its rarity. It won’t be too difficult to get a common succulent from the neighborhood nursery or a reliable online retailer for a reasonable price.

How do you choose a quality succulent?

This is the first of two posts that will show you how to cultivate and take care of succulents with ease. If you hadn’t already deduced from our Instagram page, our favorite plants are succulents. If you only take a few simple steps, they’re extremely simple to develop and maintain. On Thursday, we’ll share with you some tips that will enable you to go above and beyond today’s lesson on selecting and cultivating healthy succulents.

Pick a plant that appears happy and healthy first. When choosing a succulent, go for one with thick, pert, green leaves. This is the simplest method of determining whether the succulent you are choosing is nutritious. The plant isn’t necessarily going to die right away if its leaves are brown, wilted, or drooping, but it is demonstrating that it hasn’t been properly cared for. Pick a plant that is already healthy to bring home to ensure success.

You might come across a plant that has been painted or has ornaments (like a face) pasted on it; this is one of the more recent trends in succulents. Although this is partly a question of taste, I would advise against buying these plants. The plant may not be able to absorb enough sunlight if the leaves are painted, and decorations that are glued on may cover or harm the leaves.

One thing to keep in mind concerning succulents is that a change in color does not necessarily indicate a problem with the plant. To produce stress colors, some farmers purposefully underwater or overexpose their plants to sun. Additionally, these colors are something more experienced growers can explore but do not indicate that the plant is in immediate danger. Additionally, if you purchase a plant that is displaying stress colors, it can return to green quickly after you bring it home and give it the right care.

Pick the appropriate soil. Get a decent, well-draining soil for your plants if you wish to cultivate succulents or cacti. A pre-made mix or a homemade version are also options. The majority of gardening shops and nurseries sell this, and they may assist you in finding one according on how you care for your plants or even one built just for your area. There are many internet guides that can assist you if you wish to make your own.

Choose a pot that drains well. You’ll need a pot or planter that aids in water drainage once you’ve got your plant and your well-draining soil. Choose a plant that either has a drainage hole in the bottom or is in a pot made of unglazed ceramic to assist wick away moisture.

Ensure that they receive adequate sunlight. Keep in mind that succulents thrive naturally in sunny deserts and adore the sun! Make sure your plants receive enough sunlight whether you keep them inside or outside. If your plant isn’t getting enough light, it will begin to become “leggy or change color, which is a clue that it needs more. In order to give my succulents enough of the frequencies of light they require to remain healthy in the winter, I replicate sunlight with a grow lamp. I have an Amazon-purchased LED grow light, a clamp light, and a Wemo programmable plug that I can monitor remotely and change depending on how well my plants are doing.

Use little water. Keep in mind that the majority of succulents and cacti are native to the desert and thrive there. Their large, water-storing leaves developed so the plants could survive in the desert. The majority of succulent plants killed unintentionally by growers were overwatered. When you water your plants, make sure the soil is well saturated and let them dry completely in between waterings. If the leaves on your plants start to seem mushy or translucent, you’ve overwatered them.

Be tolerant. Although it can seem a little too easy, be patient! Because succulents are plants, any adjustments you make to make your plant healthy can take a few days or even weeks to take effect.

How frequently ought one to water succulents?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.