Where To Buy Legit Succulent Seeds

It ought to be obvious, but choosing seeds from a reliable supplier will make a significant impact! Many succulent seeds resemble dust or dirt, making them easily mistaken for other objects.

The Walawala Studio store on Etsy is my go-to place to get succulent seeds. They have a wide variety of seeds, some of which are more uncommon species, and the seeds are of the highest caliber.

Great seeds are also sold by other retailers on Amazon and Etsy. Just make sure you read customer reviews before you buy. It will take some time to determine whether succulent seeds are what they claim to be, even though they are not particularly expensive.

Are succulents challenging to cultivate from seeds?

You can move your seeds securely to new sites after they have developed into large enough plants.

Growing succulents from seeds isn’t particularly difficult, but it does require the right tools and some patience, just like growing any other kind of plant from seed does.

You should be able to produce your own succulents as long as you are patient and adhere to the aforementioned instructions.

Step 1: Fill the seed starting slots

I started by placing my succulent soil into each of the planting holes in my seed-standing tray. After fully soaking the soil, I let the extra water drain into the sink through the drainage holes.

Step 2: Add seeds

I then carefully cleaned and dried my hands. The succulent seeds are really tiny, so I wanted to take precautions to prevent losing or contaminating them. In each planting hole, I placed one seed and lightly pressed it into the moist dirt.

Step 3: Provide light, humidity, and water

The germination, rhizomes, and growth of succulent seeds require a lot of moisture. Because the seed starting tray features drainage holes where the extra water may flow into, watering them is quite simple. When that tray is kept somewhat moist, you can “water them from the bottom.” You can also begin watering as usual from the top once the seeds begin to grow.

The seed tray’s translucent plastic dome, which is placed atop it, aids in moisture retention. This is crucial to ensuring the happiness of the seedlings as they emerge and preventing the soil from drying out! The recommended temperature range for indoor plants is between 65 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, just like other indoor plants. There is also some heat retention thanks to the dome.

To see if there was a significant difference, I chose to use two different lighting arrangements. One of the trays is placed in a bathroom window that receives sunlight in the late morning, midday, and evening. I placed the other tray next to a window that receives morning sunlight but is also covered by a grow light for eight hours every day. (I discussed my grow light in this post about inexpensive, useful presents for plant lovers.)

Step 4: Baby them!

Continue giving your seeds water and sunshine. Within two to eight weeks, they ought to “sprout.” You can take off the topping a few days after your seeds have sprouted. They must breathe some air! As needed, keep filling the water tray. Keep the soil from drying out.

You can reduce watering once you start to see the root system truly taking shape (usually after around 3 or 4 months). Start by letting the soil to dry out in between waterings, exactly like you would with a typical succulent. Then, carefully transfer your brand-new, tiny babies to their respective pots.

Don’t worry if mold starts to appear on top of your seedling trays. Remove the lid so they can breathe. You can also be watering your plants excessively, so cut back. If you’d like, you can dig away a portion of the top dirt layer. Nevertheless, as you can see in the image below, it isn’t harming or stopping the seedling from growing.

Overwatering, on the other hand, can harm your seedling or result in its tiny, exposed roots decomposing once it starts to grow. Also, if your seeds haven’t germinated after a few weeks, don’t worry. Mine started sprouting after around 2 weeks, and they sprouted intermittently for weeks after that.

In the future, I’ll update this post to reflect the development of each of my succulent types. Happy planting in the meanwhile!

Which succulent is the simplest to grow?

A stylish decorative addition to any home are succulents. For your indoor environment, this wide range of plants offers countless color combinations and low maintenance possibilities. Succulents are able to hold water for longer periods of time than most plants, which require a moist climate to survive. Because of this characteristic, succulents may thrive well in the hot, dry environments of the ordinary home.

Beginner-friendly plants are succulents. Succulents have an alluring charm and come in a range of forms, dimensions, and textures. Here are six succulents that may be grown year-round inside with ease.

Jade Tree. The jade plant, which is indigenous to South Africa, features robust stems and glossy green leaves. Water jade when the soil gets dry and keep it in direct sunlight. Jade is frequently harmed by overwatering, so exercise caution.

Liquid aloe. Since ancient times, this prickly herb has been utilized medicinally. The inner leaves’ sap is used to treat burns and treat wounds. Aloe Vera needs to be kept in direct sunshine and irrigated if the leaves feel parched or fragile. To enjoy the beauty of this medicinal plant every day, keep it beside a well-lit kitchen window.

Echeveria. This native to the desert comes in a range of colors and thrives in dry environments. Once the echeveria has dried out, it should only be watered. This succulent grows best in unglazed clay pots because the clay enables water to evaporate. Echeveria should be grown in full sun with well-drained soil for best results.

The Zebra Plant. The horizontal stripes that adorn the leaves of this eye-catching succulent give it its name. The zebra plant, which is neat, contained, and ideal for any little place, is around 5 tall and 6 wide. A modest amount of sunshine and water are needed for zebra plants.

Panda Tree. This plant has tiny white hairs that give it a fuzzy appearance. Panda plants, native to Madagascar, enjoy the dry winter air inside of heated dwellings. Just enough water, as needed, to prevent the leaves from shriveling

King of Thorns With the help of this lovely plant, add some color to your space. It can bloom all year long if exposed to enough sunlight, producing bracts that are red or yellow and enclosing the tiny flowers. Crown of Thorns prefers low to moderate watering requirements and should be grown in full sun.

Which succulent grows the quickest?

Naturally, the location and inherent characteristics of low-maintenance succulents affect their growth rates. One of the fastest-growing succulents, for instance, is the Echeveria, whereas Haworthias grow somewhat slowly. The former increases from just two inches to six to eight inches in twelve months, whereas the latter increases from two inches to around five inches in more than twelve months. How quickly can succulents grow, then, is a question without a clear answer. There is no denying that houseplants or succulents typically grow quickly.

Your favorite succulents have unique growing and hibernation seasons, which is another fascinating quality. Succulents do not grow during the dormant season but instead grow during the growing season according to the environment and their natural growth rate. This blog will offer a wealth of knowledge regarding the rates of growth of various succulent species.

Fast Growing Succulents

It’s important to comprehend what fast-growing succulents entail. These succulents start off with little to no growth within a month. However, the plant’s growth rate appears to be fantastic throughout the course of the following four to six months.

Examples of Fast Growing Succulent Plants

  • The three fastest-growing members of the aloe family are Aloe vera, Aloe barbadensis, and Aloe arborescens. In just under a year, these houseplants grow from two inches to six inches.
  • One of the tall succulents that grows quickly is called the String of Buttons (Crassula perforata). It increases in height by at least a foot and a half. For the optimal growth, these non-toxic plants prefer direct and strong light.
  • Another species with a reputation for rapid growth is the Mother of Thousands or Kalanchoe. If you enjoy houseplants with spectacular growth, think about using succulents for your landscape, such as Lavender scallops or Bryophyllum fedtschenkoi. The Kalanchoe diagremontana, Kalanchoe marmorata, and Kalanchoe tomentosa are further members of the family.
  • Echeverias have exceptional growth rates, as was previously mentioned. The best examples are Hens and Chicks. In around a year, a two-inch plant can reach a height of six or eight inches.
  • The Sedum rubrotinctum, popularly known as the jelly bean plant, is a member of the Stonecrop or Sedum family and has a remarkable rate of development. To reach around a foot in height, it takes about a year.
  • Century plants, often known as agaves, are succulents with large growths. Initially growing into exceptionally large plants in a period of two to three years, the size is that of a human fist. Agave stricta, Agave attenuata, and other species from this family are examples of those with rapid growth.

How to Make Succulents Grow Faster?

You must give your houseplants the right care if you want to hasten their rate of growth. If you provide them with a pleasant environment, you’ll see that they grow slowly and contently. Here are some pointers to make sure succulents develop quickly:

  • Be sure the potting soil drains properly. For optimum growth, select a normal cactus potting mix. You need to do a little extra research to get the proper soil type if the succulent has specifications for a special soil type.
  • Similar to this, make sure the container you choose has adequate drainage holes. The plant could decay if not. Because it breathes, terracotta is a viable option as a potting material.
  • Make sure to water at the appropriate time and in the proper amount. When you believe the soil is fully dry, add water. You should also water the soil rather than the leaves or stems directly.
  • Give the succulent adequate light so that it can grow properly. Prior knowledge of the plant’s lighting requirements is essential. Typically, succulents don’t like long periods of direct sunshine. Your plant may be growing abnormally long because of a lack of sunshine.
  • Cut off the old leaves if the plant has begun to look scraggly.
  • Fertilizers are typically not needed for succulents. However, if you want faster development, you can feed them once during the growing season. Utilizing organic fertilizers is ideal.

How quickly do succulents grow?

Succulents’ rate of growth is influenced by a number of factors, including temperature, light, soil, humidity, and water. It also depends on the species’ natural development factors. However, in the majority of situations, succulents grow slowly in the first few months before accelerating as they get older. Succulents, especially those that grow quickly, typically have a noticeable growth rate by the fourth or fifth month.

How to grow big succulents?

Make sure to choose succulents that grow quickly on their own. In addition, you must create the ideal conditions for growth in order to achieve outstanding growth.

What You’ll Need:

  • slicing shears
  • gardening mitts (for handling spiny varieties)
  • a little trowel
  • potting soil for cacti and succulents
  • jars with sufficient drainage holes

Remove Some Leaves or Behead

Take a few leaves at random from your succulent plant, gently twisting each one off the stem without breaking it.

These can be cut off the bottom of the stem, which will be discarded, when it begins to grow lanky.

To remove a specific leaf from a plant, such as a Christmas cactus, you might need to use scissors.

If you’re “beheading,” cut the stem of the plant head cleanly with your scissors or clippers about an inch below the lower leaves.

Plant

When roots start to form, either choose a site in your garden that is ideal for planting or fill well-draining containers of your choosing with potting material.

Sunshine and well-drained soil are ideal for succulent growth. They get paler in the absence of sunlight, and they decompose in excess moisture.

When the sun is less powerful, such as in the early morning or late afternoon, plant in a sunny location.

To lift the cuttings above the edge of your container or garden surface, pile dirt higher. To stabilize the roots, gently tamp the earth down; do not water.

Water and Feed

It’s time to buy a succulent/cactus food at this stage, such as Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food, which is sold on Amazon. administer as directed by the manufacturer.

Succulents can also be propagated via cuttings that are placed on top of potting soil and allowed to callus off so they can root themselves in the soil.

Succulent leaves—are they seeds?

The most popular methods for propagating succulents include cuttings, offsets, leaves, and division. Growing succulents from seed is a fun and instructive approach to grow more plants. The sole way to propagate some succulents, including Dudleya, Lithops, Echeveria, and Cacti, is from seed because it is the most feasible method. Since many succulents do not offset as freely as others, this is the case. Succulents are frequently available in smaller sizes in nurseries. Because they are cultivated from seed, different succulents don’t typically come in 2″ pots, or if they do, they might cost more.

A gratifying and enjoyable method to learn about a plant’s whole life cycle is to grow succulents from seed. Getting seed is the initial stage in this procedure. Online sources for succulent seeds can be difficult to locate and are frequently unreliable. Collecting seed from your own collection is the greatest method to ensure that you are receiving what you expect.

The maturity and cross-pollination of your mother plant affect your ability to gather seeds. It could take the plant several years to flower if it is a young one. All three genera—Aeonium, Greenovia, and Agave—are monocarpic, which means a rosette will only bloom once throughout its lifetime and that it can take longer to be able to collect seed from them. Aeonium are quick-growing plants that, once planted in the garden, will eventually bloom annually from various offsets.

Many succulents require cross-pollination, which is the transfer of pollen from one plant of the same species to another. If you do not notice pollinators visiting your plants or if your collection is kept in an area that is not accessible to pollinators, you will need to manually pollinate them with a little paintbrush. Note: Cuttings from the same plant that are genetically identical succulents will not result in the production of viable seed. The fruit will begin to grow and mature, which is a sign that pollination has taken place.

How to Gather:

Seed capsules should be fully ripe and dry before collection in order to ensure the best viability. Some fruits, like Aloe spp., will naturally split open and disseminate. In this instance, it’s crucial to gather the seeds before they fall to the ground or are carried away by the wind but before the seed capsule becomes dry or brown. Use a small net or sock to catch the flower stalks, or place a dish or tray underneath.

the image above Green describes an unripe Glottiphyllum nellii fruit (left). a hard, brown, dried, and ready to be harvested seed capsule (right).

Place a paper bag over the inflorescence, cut the stem, and turn the bag upside down to gather minuscule seeds like those of Aeonium, Dudleya, and Echeveria without losing them to the breeze.

NEVER take seeds from natural ecosystems. If you don’t have a permit, this is termed poaching and is against the law.

Aeonium ‘Ballerina’ seed not yet ready for harvest (left) and Aeonium ‘Thundercloud’ seed ready for harvest and planting are shown in the image above (right).

Processing Seeds:

The capsules may simply be opened by hand, allowing the seeds to be processed. Smaller seeds can be treated by first separating the seed from the capsules with a small grinder, and then using a mesh filter to separate the seed from the chaff. You can remove the seeds from hard seed capsules, such as Mesembs (Lithops, Glottiphyllum, etc.), by putting them in a Ziploc bag or paper bag, pounding them with a hammer, and then removing them by hand.

To avoid having them suddenly blown away by a gust of wind, always process seeds indoors.

How to Keep Seeds Safe:

Seeds should be kept in dry, protected settings in paper bags or seed packs. Heat and humidity severely impair viability. Make sure the seeds are totally dry if you intend to store them in plastic bags. Seeds that are prematurely picked will perish in glass or plastic due to an overabundance of moisture. Name of the species, time and place of collection should all be written on the packaging. When stored properly, seeds can be kept for many years without losing viability.

Growing numerous plants from your own seed is a sustainable method. The color and structure of leaf can vary widely due to genetic variety. The real fun starts now, and you might even be able to come up with a unique list of choices.