Where To Buy Cheap Succulents In Singapore

If you don’t buy succulents from the appropriate source, you may experience issues. Because succulents can be pricey, you don’t want to purchase a plant that is injured or infected. Success with succulents depends on knowing where to acquire them. After purchasing a starting set, you can learn how to re-grow your succulents so that you will always have an abundance of your own.

Ikea

Unbelievably, Ikea has an excellent range of reasonably priced succulents. They have sold me many succulents that had young succulents sprouting from the sides. BONUS! The plants have been strong and their pricing are excellent. One more good reason to love Ikea! Additionally, while you are there, look at their pots as well. They provide some extremely adorable and inexpensive solutions.

Amazon

What can’t you purchase on Amazon? It turns out that you can purchase some really awesome succulents on Amazon! You may have a vast selection of succulents delivered to your door for less than $2 per plant plus prime shipping. If you’re just getting started and unsure of which variety you want to work with, this is ideal!

The Succulent Source

I’ve only heard great things about the Succulent Source. The succulent selection at this family-owned business is incredible. Every conceivable size and shape. Even the youngsters help the succulents grow! I adore it. Go now and look them up.

Be sure to adhere to the care recommendations after you have your succulents. Check out these typical explanations for why your succulents are dying if you start to experience any problems. Also, if you manage to get your hands on one of those fantastic succulent species, check out this too-cute for words concept for an indoor succulent garden!

Succulents can they live in Singapore?

The fleshy plants that covered a garden archway and hung from swinging baskets, covering both sides of the linkway to the main event tent, may have caught your attention if you were one of the 70,000 people who visited HortPark during the recent GardenTech 2009. These plants belong to the two genera Sedum and Senecio and are succulents, or water-retaining plants. Both are unusual additions to any home or garden because neither is indigenous to our equatorial environment.

Succulent species from these genera are well-liked indoor plants in Singapore due to their beauty, hardiness, and low maintenance requirements. These succulent plants come from a variety of habitats and have quite different growth requirements, therefore not all of them are suitable for our tropical climate. Any attempt to grow the more temperate species here will fail since they cannot stand the heat.

The few plants listed below can grow in Singapore, however they hardly ever bloom. This is due to the lack of seasonal or daily temperature variations in our climate. They can be cultivated in rooftop gardens, cacti and succulent outdoor gardens, dish gardens for indoor décor, and more!

These succulents should be cultivated in locations that receive at least six hours of full sun to moderate shade, depending on the species. They thrive in free-draining soil, so a mixture of 50% sifting scorched earth and 50% commercial cactus mix would be excellent. Stem cuttings make it simple to multiply the majority of species.

Only water the plants after the top inch of the soil has begun to dry out, and feed them once a week with coated, slow-release fertilizer pellets or half-strength liquid fertilizer.

The majority of the species in the genus Sedum are succulent plants known as stonecrops. Some plants of the Crassulaceae family are edible and have therapeutic benefits. Others are grown locally and in temperate nations as green roof plants.

Senecio genus species are highly diverse. Succulents with leaves, stems, and tubers are one type, but there are also climbers, shrubs, and miniature trees. They have branching clusters of daisy-like flowers and are an Asteraceae plant.

During the recent GardenTech 2009, the archway that welcomed guests was decorated with a variety of succulent plants.

Sedum morganianum, the donkey’s tail plant, has spindle-shaped leaves with a silver-blue hue. It is appropriate for growing in hanging baskets in protected, somewhat shaded places because of its long, pendulous stems, which, if left to develop, can reach 1 m or more. S. burrito, which has smaller, rounder leaves and is more difficult to cultivate in Singapore, is sometimes confused with it.

The Mexican stonecrop, also known as Sedum mexicanum, forms a mound. It grows best in full sunlight, when the small, linear leaves develop a vivid, greenish yellow hue. It can be raised as a groundcover plant and is helpful for enhancing borders and containers with color.

The mat-forming species Sedum sexangulare, sometimes known as tasteless or watch chain stonecrop, is distinguished by its small, oblong leaves, which are grouped in six parallel rows. It can be used on rock walls, between big stones on a terrace, or in containers and thrives in partial shade.

Another mat-forming species with somewhat rounded leaves is Sedum sarmentosum. As its leaves acquire an ugly yellow color when exposed to high sunlight and excessive dryness, it looks best when grown in semi-shade. This plant is also known by the names stringy stonecrop and graveyard moss.

A vine called Senecio macroglossus mimics English ivy (Hedera helix). Its leaves have five pointed corners, are smooth and meaty to the touch. This drought-tolerant vine can be left to trail over a pot and grows well in partially shaded regions. As a climber, it takes advantage of any opportunity to wrap its stems around any vertical support it may find. This image displays the striped variant.

Senecio rowleyanus, often known as the “string of pearls” or “string of beads,” is a trailing plant that produces long, pendulous stems of roughly spherical leaves. This plant, which works well in hanging baskets in a sunny location, should be kept on the dry side to avoid decay. You shouldn’t eat the poisonous, meaty leaves.

What succulent is ideal for beginners?

If you’ve ever experienced a severe sunburn, the aloe plant is undoubtedly well known to you.

One of the most well-liked succulents for beginners, this plant’s sap not only cures sunburn but is also incredibly simple to grow!

Aloe can be grown in a plethora of diverse forms, including those with zebra stripes, speckles, dots, a crown of pointed leaves, and more. Any selection you make will make your windowsill look good.

Aloe succulents need only a nice windowsill, a container with sufficient drainage, and watering anytime the soil becomes dry for them to thrive. Whether you take good care of them or have a propensity for neglect, these tiny fellows are not choosy and will prosper and look gorgeous.

Why are succulents so expensive?

A succulent’s scarcity, maintenance expenses, therapeutic benefits, and aesthetic value are some of the elements that might make it pricey.

Rarity of Succulent

A very rare succulent will cost a lot of money to buy. There is limited rivalry among vendors because there are few stores in the USA that sell succulents. A succulent can be sold for a greater price and still make money if it is in short supply.

High maintenance cost

Succulents can occasionally take a very long time to grow. The more money and energy spent on a plant, the longer it takes for it to flourish. The plant may also require further feeding and pruning. The price of the succulent may increase as a result of these reasons.

Aesthetic Value of The Succulent

A succulent could cost more if it has a wonderful appearance that can improve the aesthetic of a space. These hardy plants are excellent for use as décor because they can be eye-catching and lovely. A succulent may fetch a greater price in the market if it is in demand because of its aesthetic value due to increased demand.

Medicinal importance

Succulent varieties with medical potential include salo, yucca, and aloe vera. Yucca has particular phytonutrients that can be helpful in alleviating arthritic pain and inflammation. Additionally, digestive system inflammation can be treated with aloe vera.

Because plants help speed up the healing of wounds and treat eczema, succulents are frequently found in hospitals. Succulents have been used to treat a number of medical conditions, including coughing.

What time of year is ideal for purchasing succulents?

Although they enjoy the heat, succulents actually grow more slowly in the summer. It can be challenging for newcomers to water them during the intense summer heat.

Winter presents additional challenges for people who are new to cultivating succulents because the frigid temperatures can harm or even kill them.

You will discover that most places have a better selection and healthier plants if you shop for succulents in the warmer (but not the warmest) months because there is a higher turnover of them then and the supply is always fresh.

Succulents grow best in the spring and fall, so now is an excellent time to buy them. It offers you a chance to become accustomed to their care before the onset of either the extremely hot or extremely cold weather.

How frequently do succulents need to be watered?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

How are little succulents cared for?

9 Plant-Care Tips on How to Take Care of Succulents (And Not Kill Them)

  • Ensure That Your Succulents Receive Enough Light.
  • Repeatedly rotate your succulents.
  • Depending on the Season, Drink Water.
  • Directly water the soil.
  • Keep your succulents tidy.
  • Pick a container with a drainage system.
  • In the proper soil, grow succulents.
  • Eliminate bugs.

Is the aloe vera plant a succulent?

An easy-to-care-for, eye-catching succulent that grows well indoors is the aloe vera plant. Aloe vera plants are helpful as well because the juice from their leaves can be administered topically to treat the discomfort associated with burns and scrapes. How to cultivate and take care of aloe vera plants at home is provided here.

About Aloe Vera

Aloe vera is a species of succulent plant in the Aloe genus. The plant has thick, fleshy, greenish leaves that fan out from the stem at the center and is stemless or has extremely short stems. The leaf’s margin is toothed and serrated.

Be aware that you will require an area that delivers bright, indirect sunlight before you purchase an aloe (or artificial sunlight). If your aloe is located in an area that receives a lot of direct sunlight, you may need to water it more frequently because the plant might become overly dried up and develop yellow mushy leaves.

ALOE VERA LEAF GEL SHOULD NOT BE EATEN BY PEOPLE OR PETS. WARNING: Aloe vera leaf gel can be applied topically. It may even be harmful in higher doses and can result in unpleasant symptoms like nausea or indigestion.

Before Planting

  • Selecting the appropriate kind of container is crucial. It is advised to choose a pot made of terra-cotta or another porous material since it will allow the soil to completely dry between waterings and be weighty enough to prevent the plant from toppling over. You may also use a plastic or glazed pot, but they’ll hold more moisture.
  • Make sure you select a container with at least one drainage hole on the bottom when making your selection. This is crucial because the hole will let extra water drain away. Aloe vera plants are resilient, but poor draining can lead to rot and wilting, which is by far the most prevalent reason for this plant’s demise.
  • Choose a container that is around the same width as it is deep. Choose a container that is deep enough to allow you to bury the full stem of your aloe plant if it has one.
  • Use a well-draining potting mix, such as those designed for cactus and succulents, for aloe vera plants because they are succulents. Never use soil for gardening. Perlite, lava rock, bits of bark, or all three, should be used in an excellent mixture.
  • There is no requirement for a layer of gravel, clay balls, or any other “drainage material in the bottom of the pot. Only space that the roots could have used is being taken up by this. A hole for drainage is sufficient drainage!
  • Dust the plant’s stem with a rooting hormone powder before planting your aloe to help it produce new roots. Rooting hormone can be purchased online or at a nearby garden center or hardware store.

How to Plant (or Repot) an Aloe Vera Plant

It’s time to repot your aloe plant if it has become lanky, has become too big, or just needs an improvement. This is how:

  • Get your pot ready. Place a tiny piece of screen over the drainage hole after fully drying the new pot and giving it a fast rinse (or a good scrub, if it’s a pot you’ve used before). This will prevent soil from falling out the bottom and will allow water to flow correctly. Although these will degrade over time, a piece of newspaper or paper towel folded twice can also be used in a pinch.
  • Get your plant ready. Remove the aloe vera plant from its existing container and, taking care to avoid damaging the roots, brush away any extra dirt from the roots.
  • If your plant has puppies, get rid of them right away. (For information on how to take out and pot pups, see the “Care” section of this page.)
  • Trimming the stem can be done if your plant has an extremely long, spindly stem that won’t fit in the pot. Be aware that the plant could die if you do this. Trim the stem by cutting off a portion while keeping as much of it attached to the plant as you can. Take the naked plant next, and set it somewhere warm with indirect light. After a few days, the wound will develop a callus. Continue now with the repotting methods listed below.
  • Establish your plant. Place your plant in the soil after filling the pot with potting soil that drains properly approximately a third of the way. Remember to leave at least 3/4 of an inch of space between the top of the soil and the rim of the pot when you fill in the soil around the plant. The aloe plant’s bottom leaves should also be barely visible above the ground. After planting, stop watering.
  • Neglect your plant (temporarily). Don’t water your aloe for at least a week after putting it in its new pot. This will lessen the possibility of rot and give the plant more time to grow new roots. Keep the plant in a warm location with bright but indirect light until it appears to be rooted and content.

How to Care for an Aloe Vera Plant

  • Lighting: Use artificial light or direct, bright sunlight. The best window is one facing west or south. Low-light aloe plants can get lanky.
  • Aloe vera thrives at temperatures between 55 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13 and 27C). Most flats and residences have comfortable temperatures. You can bring your plant outside without issue from May to September, but if the nights are chilly, bring it back inside.
  • Fertilizing: Use a balanced houseplant formula blended at half strength only in the spring and summer, and fertilize infrequently (no more than once a month).
  • Repotting: When the roots become bound, repotted using the guidelines in “Planting, above.

Watering Aloe Vera

The hardest part of maintaining good aloe vera is watering, but it’s really not that complicated. Although the aloe is a succulent plant used to dry conditions, its thick leaves nevertheless require enough water.

  • Aloe vera plants need deep, but intermittent, watering. To put it another way, the soil should feel damp after watering, but you should let it partially dry out before you water it again. The roots of the plant may rot if the soil is kept excessively moist.
  • Allow the top third of the potting soil to dry out between waterings to make sure you aren’t overwatering your plant. For instance, if your plant is housed in 6 inches of potting soil, wait until the top 2 inches are completely dry before giving it another drink. (Check the soil’s dryness with your finger.)
  • Typically, you should water your aloe plant every two to three weeks in the spring and summer and even less frequently in the fall and winter. One general guideline for watering in the fall and winter is to roughly double the intervals between waterings (as compared to your summer watering schedule). In other words, water every four weeks in the winter instead of every two weeks in the summer.
  • When watering, some extra water could leak out the pot’s bottom. So that the soil may absorb as much of the water as possible, let the pot stand in it. After waiting 10 to 15 minutes, discard any leftover water.

Removing & Replanting Aloe Vera Offsets (Pups)

Offsets, also known as plantlets, pups, or “babies,” are frequently produced by mature aloe vera plants and can be removed to create a completely new plant (a clone of the mother plant, technically).

  • Utilizing pruning shears, scissors, or a sharp knife, locate the locations where the offsets are linked to the mother plant and remove them. Leave the offset with at least an inch of stem.
  • For several days, let the offsets remain free of soil; this will allow the offset to develop a callus over the cut, helping to prevent it from rotting. During this stage, keep the offsets in a warm area with indirect light.
  • Put the offsets in a typical succulent potting mix once they have developed calluses. The soil need to drain well.
  • Place the freshly potted puppies in a bright area. Keep the soil on the dry side and wait at least a week before watering.

How to Get Your Aloe Vera to Flower

A tall flower spike termed an inflorescence, which is occasionally produced by mature aloe vera plants, gives rise to dozens of tubular yellow or red blooms. The already beautiful aloe is surely given a new degree of intrigue by this!

Aloes cultivated as houseplants unfortunately rarely blossom because they need virtually perfect growing circumstances to do so: lots of sunshine, enough water, and the correct temperature range. Aloe blooms are typically only found on plants cultivated outdoors year-round in warm climates due to these needs (mostly lighting).

To increase the likelihood that your aloe will flower:

  • Give it as much light as you can, particularly in the spring and summer. Aloes can be kept outdoors in the summertime when the temperature is over 70F and the sun is shining (21C). Bring the aloe indoors if the temperature is expected to drop below 60F (16C) at night.
  • Note: Give your aloe time to acclimate to the harsh light before moving it from indoors to full sun. Otherwise, it could get sunburned. Prior to relocating it to a more sunny position, let it remain in partial shade for about a week.
  • Ensure that the plant receives the proper amount of water—enough to prevent it from drying out completely, but not too much to drown it! Make sure the plant isn’t getting constantly sopped by summer rains if it’s being maintained outside.
  • Provide your aloe with a suitable period of dormancy in the fall and winter. Aloe often flower in the late winter or early spring; therefore, allowing them a period of rest with less regular watering and milder temperatures may encourage them to flower.
  • If it continues to fail to flower, don’t be shocked. Despite our best attempts, most aloes simply can’t thrive indoors, so don’t be surprised if yours simply won’t blossom!

Aloe that stand out as appealing include:

  • or Partridge-Breasted Aloe, the Tiger (Aloe variegata) Short, smooth leaves with irregular white stripes make up this tiny aloe.
  • A little plant with delicately sawtoothed, white-spotted leaves is called a lace aloe (Aloe aristata).
  • Aloe Vera (Aloe glauca)
  • a bigger kind of aloe that has silver-blue leaves.