Where To Buy A Cactus Plant

Southwest Arizona, western Sonora, Mexico, and even a few locations in southeast California are home to saguaro cacti. They are typically found in the northern regions on slopes that face south, where the sun shines more frequently. The Saguaro Cactus is covered in protecting needles and bears a red fruit in the summer as well as tiny white blooms in the late spring.

Only in the Sonoran Desert does the suguaro cactus, also known as Carnegiea Gigantea, flourish.

A Saguaro will only grow about one to one and a half inches in its first eight years.

Moving a saguaro cactus off of private or public land without a permit is against the law in Arizona.

Saguaro cactus roots spread out like an accordion to take in as much water as they can.

Arizona’s state flower is the saguaro bloom, which blooms only after a saguaro has reached the age of 35.

SAGUARO CACTUS FACTS

The saguaro is a unique species of plant that can get rather big yet develops extremely slowly. The saguaro’s weight and height are often astounding, and the plant’s beauty is emblematic and significant to the magnificent state of Arizona.

  • Arizona has rules and limitations on the gathering, harvesting, and disposal of these cactus. To learn more about the rules that apply to your region, get in touch with your neighborhood government.
  • The Saguaro can survive for 150 to 200 years in the appropriate growing circumstances.
  • The cactus has one major root that extends down approximately 2 feet while the remaining roots all extend out till they reach the height of the plant and only go down about 5 inches.
  • Saguaro growth is particularly slow. A saguaro may only be 1.5 inches tall after a whole decade of growth. They can potentially grow to a height of 40–60 feet under the right circumstances! After a rainy season, a completely hydrated Saguaro may weigh between 3,200 and 4,800 pounds.
  • Arizona legislation allows for the collection of saguaro “ribs,” which are used to create jewelry, furniture, roofs, fences, picture frames, and other things. Even the Native Americans used the ribs as water containers before the canteen was created.

HOW MUCH DOES A CACTUS COST?

According to DFRanchandGardens, the average price of a saguaro cactus in the US for 2020 is between $20 and $2,000 per foot.

The saguaro will cost less the smaller it is, according to osieOnTheHouse. However, if they are merely spears and in good condition, they typically sell for $100 or more per foot. The price of saguaros with arms is higher.

What is the ideal location to plant cacti?

Do you secretly yearn to live in the desert? Plant a cactus to begin your path toward your dream. In regions where they can withstand freezing temperatures, these low-maintenance plants make beautiful landscape plants as well as ideal houseplants. You did read that correctly, There are a ton of cold-tolerant cactus species! For instance, prickly pear cacti may survive rather far north. Giving a cactus what it wants in terms of light, soil, water, and food can ensure its success in any location.

Where to Grow a Cactus

Cactus plants come in a wide variety, some of which even grow in trees! However, the majority of individuals either grow theirs inside as houseplants or outdoors in the landscape. Always read the plant tags for precise information, but in general, cacti want full light and soil that drains quickly. This calls for growing close to a window that faces south or west indoors.

When the nighttime temperature is at least 65 degrees F throughout the summer, you can bring indoor cactus plants outside. Move them to an area with more sun after they have spent some time outside in a protected area getting accustomed to it. If you intend to transport plants between indoors and outdoors, morning sun is optimal.

When to Plant a Cactus

Try to put a cactus outside in the late spring or early summer while the plants are actively growing. They’ll start off more smoothly and swiftly put down roots.

How to Plant a Cactus Outside

1. Most cactus plants require light, permeable soil. Mix native soil and Miracle-Gro Garden Soil for Cactus, Palm & Citrus in equal parts to prepare the soil in the planting location. The cactus is protected by Moisture Control technology against both over- and under-watering, both of which can be problematic.

2. Create a hole that is 11/2 times as big and as deep as the stem or root ball of the plant (some transplanted cacti don’t have large root balls).

3. Position the plant in the hole so that its north side faces that direction. If there isn’t a flag or chalk marking this side, make sure to inquire before you leave the garden center. Here’s why it’s significant: The more sun-exposed south side of the plant typically produces tougher skin that is more resistant to sunburn. On the other hand, the north side might not be able to withstand the sun as well.

4. Add more soil mixture to the area around the root ball and gently pat it down.

5. Lightly water.

6. To acclimate a cactus to the intense outdoor sun before planting one that was produced in an outdoor greenhouse, cover it with a little amount of shade cloth for a few weeks.

How to Plant a Cactus Indoors

1. Choose a container that is 112 times as broad as the stem or root ball of the cactus. You might want to use an unglazed container because it will dry out more rapidly if your environment is humid or you have a tendency to water plants excessively.

2. Add fast-draining to the pot until it is 1/3 full. The perfect nutrients are included in Miracle-Gro Cactus, Palm & Citrus Potting Mix to give your cactus a head start.

3. Set the cactus in the pot with the stem or root ball at the same depth as it was before being moved. To protect your hands, put on gloves or cover them with many layers of newspaper.

4. Fill in the area around the rootball, leaving a space of about an inch between the soil’s top and the container’s rim.

5. Lightly water the soil until it resembles a wrung-out sponge.

How to Water a Cactus

It may come as no surprise to find that under-watering is the second most prevalent reason for cactus plant deaths, even though over-watering is the most common cause. Finding the sweet spot can be challenging because it differs in the summer when plants are actively developing from the winter when they are more passive. A decent rule of thumb is to water your cactus when the top 3 inches of soil are dry if you’re growing it indoors. This might imply a few times every week during the summer and just once every four to six weeks throughout the winter. Watch out for your plants: They likely need water if they start to appear a little wilted. However, unless there hasn’t been any rain in your region for several months, you shouldn’t need to water your cactus at all outside.

How to Feed a Cactus

Cacti may not require a lot of water, but they do require food. If you used Miracle-Gro Garden Soil for Cactus, Palm & Citrus to prepare the soil before planting your cactus outdoors, you should begin feeding it Miracle-Gro Water Soluble All Purpose Plant Food a month after planting. This will provide your prickly baby quick nutrients. Meals should start for potted cactus plants approximately a month after planting. Apply Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food directly to the soil, then water as usual to feed your succulent plants. Make sure you read the instructions before using any type of plant food.

How to Prune a Cactus

Put simply, don’t! If you do, all you’ll get is a cut-site area of corky, dried-out scar tissue. The best course of action if your cactus outgrows your living space is to give it to a friend who has more room and get a new, smaller specimen for yourself.

Dealing with Cactus Problems

If you don’t submerge your cactus, it should continue to thrive with little trouble. Unfortunately, there isn’t much you can do to prevent rot problems caused by overwatering besides starting over.

Are cactus plants suitable for indoor use?

Despite being recognized for their love of sunlight, many cacti grow well as houseplants. For some unusual decor, place one on your windowsill or in your living area. The ideal houseplant, indoor cacti typically require less light and are smaller in stature.

Bunny Ears Cactus (Opuntia microdasys)

The bunny ears cactus gets its name from its look and is native to Mexico. Its two pads are designed like bunny ears. They should be handled carefully since they have glochids or brown prickles on them. The bunny ears cactus is the ideal indoor plant because it may reach heights of two to three feet. If given enough light, it will blossom with white flowers and bear purple fruits in the summer.

Chin Cactus (Gymnocalycium)

Gymnocalycium is a kind of cactus native to South America and is frequently referred to as the “chin cactus.” Greek for “naked kalyx,” its name alludes to the flower buds’ lack of hair or spines. Some chin cactus like shade, while others do better in sunlight, depending on the kind.

Saguaro Cactus (Carnegiea gigantea)

Although it grows slowly, the Saguaro cactus can reach a height of forty feet. This indicates that you can use it as an indoor plant for a number of years before relocating it outside. It has the traditional cactus appearance thanks to its barrel-shaped body. This plant, which is a native of the Sonoran Desert, needs a lot of sunshine. Place the plant in direct sunlight if it is being maintained indoors.

Old Lady Cactus (Mammillaria hahniana)

The mammillaria family, which comprises 250 species, includes the old lady cactus as a subspecies of pincushion cactus. It is renowned for its halo of small pink or purple flowers that bloom in the spring and possesses hairs and spines. A sandy potting mix should be used to plant the old lady cactus, and it should receive water every other week.

Star Cactus (Astrophytum asteria)

The star cactus, also known as sea urchin or sand dollar cactus, can be recognized by its circular body that is divided into eight slices. It has small white spots and white hairs all over it. It produces a yellow blossom in the spring. The star cactus is the perfect indoor plant because its diameter only reaches two to six inches.

Easter Cactus (Hatiora gaertneri)

Easter cactus, a native of Brazil, blooms in late winter or early spring. White, orange, and lavender are just a few of its bloom colors. The plant has a distinctive shape because of the way its spines are piled on top of one another.

Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii)

The Christmas cactus, which is frequently mistaken for the Thanksgiving cactus, blooms in the dead of winter. It boasts vivid red blossoms and is frequently given as a Christmas gift. The Christmas cactus thrives in average indoor settings. Don’t overwater plants because it will make their roots rot. Although this plant can thrive in low light conditions, its blossoms benefit from additional light.

Moon Cactus (Gymnocalycium mihanovichii)

The moon cactus, also referred to as the chin cactus, varies in size, shape, and color. The hibotan cactus is a well-known cultivar. Its South American origins can be traced to its vivid red, pink, yellow, and orange hues. On window sills that receive some light, these little plants flourish.