Where Can I Buy Cheap Succulents Online

If you don’t buy succulents from the appropriate source, you may experience issues. Because succulents can be pricey, you don’t want to purchase a plant that is injured or infected. Success with succulents depends on knowing where to acquire them. After purchasing a starting set, you can learn how to re-grow your succulents so that you will always have an abundance of your own.

Ikea

Unbelievably, Ikea has an excellent range of reasonably priced succulents. They have sold me many succulents that had young succulents sprouting from the sides. BONUS! The plants have been strong and their pricing are excellent. One more good reason to love Ikea! Additionally, while you are there, look at their pots as well. They provide some extremely adorable and inexpensive solutions.

Amazon

What can’t you purchase on Amazon? It turns out that you can purchase some really awesome succulents on Amazon! You may have a vast selection of succulents delivered to your door for less than $2 per plant plus prime shipping. If you’re just getting started and unsure of which variety you want to work with, this is ideal!

The Succulent Source

I’ve only heard great things about the Succulent Source. The succulent selection at this family-owned business is incredible. Every conceivable size and shape. Even the youngsters help the succulents grow! I adore it. Go now and look them up.

Be sure to adhere to the care recommendations after you have your succulents. Check out these typical explanations for why your succulents are dying if you start to experience any problems. Also, if you manage to get your hands on one of those fantastic succulent species, check out this too-cute for words concept for an indoor succulent garden!

Why are succulents so expensive?

A succulent’s scarcity, maintenance expenses, therapeutic benefits, and aesthetic value are some of the elements that might make it pricey.

Rarity of Succulent

A very rare succulent will cost a lot of money to buy. There is limited rivalry among vendors because there are few stores in the USA that sell succulents. A succulent can be sold for a greater price and still make money if it is in short supply.

High maintenance cost

Succulents can occasionally take a very long time to grow. The more money and energy spent on a plant, the longer it takes for it to flourish. The plant may also require further feeding and pruning. The price of the succulent may increase as a result of these reasons.

Aesthetic Value of The Succulent

A succulent could cost more if it has a wonderful appearance that can improve the aesthetic of a space. These hardy plants are excellent for use as d├ęcor because they can be eye-catching and lovely. A succulent may fetch a greater price in the market if it is in demand because of its aesthetic value due to increased demand.

Medicinal importance

Succulent varieties with medical potential include salo, yucca, and aloe vera. Yucca has particular phytonutrients that can be helpful in alleviating arthritic pain and inflammation. Additionally, digestive system inflammation can be treated with aloe vera.

Because plants help speed up the healing of wounds and treat eczema, succulents are frequently found in hospitals. Succulents have been used to treat a number of medical conditions, including coughing.

How much are the succulents at Trader Joe’s?

I almost bought the entire Trader Joe’s store today because they have the loveliest small succulents in little ceramic vases for only $2.99! Ha!

The BEST assortment of plants can usually be found at Trader Joe’s, and they virtually ALWAYS have the incredibly popular succulent, which is why I adore them!

The succulent is really the ONLY indoor plant you will ever need, in my opinion. especially if, like me, you have a tendency to destroy every plant. LOL!!

They require very little maintenance. They don’t require a lot of water, so even if you forget to water them for a day or two, they will still grow. In my opinion, that can only be beneficial!

They are also very possibly the cutest little plants ever, to put it mildly. Every type of succulent is so diverse, and they all have such distinct personalities. There are heart-shaped succulents as well as striped and artichoke-shaped varieties, as well as those with thick, flat leaves. Gah!

However, these tiny succulents from Trader Joe’s are AMAZING! They are adorable, but their $2.99 price has me smitten as well.

First of all, if you have never been to a Trader Joe’s, we need to change that because it is the most AMAZING store.

Usually, the plants are near the entrance. You can’t miss them because they are either immediately outside, on a set of shelves, or inside the entrance.

You must try their Watermelon Fruit Spread when you are there. OMG. I enjoy this material. Although it may sound odd, it is like summer in a jar.

What time of year is ideal for purchasing succulents?

Although they enjoy the heat, succulents actually grow more slowly in the summer. It can be challenging for newcomers to water them during the intense summer heat.

Winter presents additional challenges for people who are new to cultivating succulents because the frigid temperatures can harm or even kill them.

You will discover that most places have a better selection and healthier plants if you shop for succulents in the warmer (but not the warmest) months because there is a higher turnover of them then and the supply is always fresh.

Succulents grow best in the spring and fall, so now is an excellent time to buy them. It offers you a chance to become accustomed to their care before the onset of either the extremely hot or extremely cold weather.

Must I purchase succulents online?

The benefits and drawbacks of shopping online are virtually the opposite of those of shopping locally, as you would have imagined.

A benefit of internet shopping is having access to a greater selection of succulents. Due to the expertise of the dealers, there are also better specimens. You don’t even need to leave the house to shop because the plants are delivered right to your door!

The drawbacks of ordering plants online include the inability to select your specimen, the possibility of plant damage during transportation, and the higher cost.

Now, this isn’t really a drawback, but frequently, plants ordered online may come slightly unclean. Simply brush the soil away using a gentle brush. If you had an air compressor, that would be excellent because I also use one. However, avoid using canned air! The leaves of the succulent will be harmed.

Do succulents provide any advantages?

For those who enjoy a few pots of greenery on the desk at work or dispersed throughout sunny parts of the home, this ease of care is unquestionably beneficial. You’ve probably heard that succulents can enhance humidity in your dry house or office and assist remove harmful toxins from the air. This additional moisture relieves dry, irritated skin. Additionally, it can shield you from the common cold, dry cough, and sore throats.

Succulents can help with a variety of other medical conditions. The majority of us are aware that aloe vera juice and gel are marketed for reducing inflammation, particularly in the digestive tract. Parts of the yucca plant are also said to help with inflammation in other areas of the body. These plants’ saponins and other antioxidants are used to treat arthritis pain. To produce a tea for this use, boil yucca roots.

Sometimes succulents can help ease the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema. Due to the skin’s inability to fight bacterial infections, adult cases of childhood eczema frequently result in rash and itching. Succulents serve a dual purpose in helping to treat eczema because low humidity can occasionally bring on the symptoms.

Agave juice lessens pain from a number of diseases while accelerating the healing process. In addition to being used to make tequila, it is also used to treat toothache pain, stomach disorders, and other conditions that benefit from its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and vitamin-rich characteristics. Everyone should minimize their oral agave consumption, especially pregnant ladies.

How do you choose a quality succulent?

This is the first of two posts that will show you how to cultivate and take care of succulents with ease. If you hadn’t already deduced from our Instagram page, our favorite plants are succulents. If you only take a few simple steps, they’re extremely simple to develop and maintain. On Thursday, we’ll share with you some tips that will enable you to go above and beyond today’s lesson on selecting and cultivating healthy succulents.

Pick a plant that appears happy and healthy first. When choosing a succulent, go for one with thick, pert, green leaves. This is the simplest method of determining whether the succulent you are choosing is nutritious. The plant isn’t necessarily going to die right away if its leaves are brown, wilted, or drooping, but it is demonstrating that it hasn’t been properly cared for. Pick a plant that is already healthy to bring home to ensure success.

You might come across a plant that has been painted or has ornaments (like a face) pasted on it; this is one of the more recent trends in succulents. Although this is partly a question of taste, I would advise against buying these plants. The plant may not be able to absorb enough sunlight if the leaves are painted, and decorations that are glued on may cover or harm the leaves.

One thing to keep in mind concerning succulents is that a change in color does not necessarily indicate a problem with the plant. To produce stress colors, some farmers purposefully underwater or overexpose their plants to sun. Additionally, these colors are something more experienced growers can explore but do not indicate that the plant is in immediate danger. Additionally, if you purchase a plant that is displaying stress colors, it can return to green quickly after you bring it home and give it the right care.

Pick the appropriate soil. Get a decent, well-draining soil for your plants if you wish to cultivate succulents or cacti. A pre-made mix or a homemade version are also options. The majority of gardening shops and nurseries sell this, and they may assist you in finding one according on how you care for your plants or even one built just for your area. There are many internet guides that can assist you if you wish to make your own.

Choose a pot that drains well. You’ll need a pot or planter that aids in water drainage once you’ve got your plant and your well-draining soil. Choose a plant that either has a drainage hole in the bottom or is in a pot made of unglazed ceramic to assist wick away moisture.

Ensure that they receive adequate sunlight. Keep in mind that succulents thrive naturally in sunny deserts and adore the sun! Make sure your plants receive enough sunlight whether you keep them inside or outside. If your plant isn’t getting enough light, it will begin to become “leggy or change color, which is a clue that it needs more. In order to give my succulents enough of the frequencies of light they require to remain healthy in the winter, I replicate sunlight with a grow lamp. I have an Amazon-purchased LED grow light, a clamp light, and a Wemo programmable plug that I can monitor remotely and change depending on how well my plants are doing.

Use little water. Keep in mind that the majority of succulents and cacti are native to the desert and thrive there. Their large, water-storing leaves developed so the plants could survive in the desert. The majority of succulent plants killed unintentionally by growers were overwatered. When you water your plants, make sure the soil is well saturated and let them dry completely in between waterings. If the leaves on your plants start to seem mushy or translucent, you’ve overwatered them.

Be tolerant. Although it can seem a little too easy, be patient! Because succulents are plants, any adjustments you make to make your plant healthy can take a few days or even weeks to take effect.

Cacti are they succulents?

What distinguishes a succulent from a cactus? The only plant that can survive in a hot south window, where the light shines through the glass intensified, is a cactus. Any plant that stores water in juicy leaves, stems, or roots to resist recurring droughts is considered a succulent. Some people accept non-fleshy desert plants while others exclude plants with flesh, such as epiphytic orchids (yuccas, puyas).

Cactus is merely a type of succulent that can hold moisture and is classified separately from other succulents (cacti is the plural form of cactus in Latin) (Cactaceae). On the other hand, not every succulent is a cactus. In addition to being close relatives of the pointsetta, geranium, lily, grape, amaryllis, crassula, daisy, and milkweed, succulents are members of approximately 40 botanical families that are distributed throughout the world.

The name “cactus” derives from the Greek word “kaktos,” which means “spiny plant.” The ancient Greeks used this word to describe a species that was actually an artichoke variety rather than a cactus. 2000 years later, Linnaeus, who classified plants, gave a family of plants with distinctive characteristics like thick stems that served as water reservoirs, prickly or hairy coverings, and few, if any, leaves the name Cactaceae.

Cacti are simple to spot. They rarely have leaves because they have to work so hard to stay alive. They have stems that have been altered into cylinders, pads, or joints that store water during dry spells. Skin thickness lowers evaporation. For defense against browsing animals, the majority of species have bristles or spines, but some lack them, and others have long hair or a woolly covering. Large and vibrant flowers are the norm. Fruit may be both edible and colorful.

Every cactus has leaves when it is still a seedling. Additionally, some plants briefly produce tiny leaves on their new growth each spring. The majority of cactus progressively lost their leaves as shifting climatic patterns transformed native environments into deserts, evaporating too much limited water into the dry air. They switched to storing the water that was available in their stems. To adapt the size of their evaporation surfaces to changing conditions, many may modify their shape. When moisture is abundant, ribs that resemble an accordion can extend; when there is a drought, they can contract.

The majority of succulents, such as aloes, hawthorias, crassulas, and echeveria, originated in environments with less harsh conditions than cactus, such as those with rainy seasons followed by protracted dry seasons. They all have leaves. Their leaves gradually grew fattened by water-storing tissues and covered in a waxy or horny substance that lessens evaporation from the surface to help them get through the dry spells.

From Canada, through Central America, the West Indies, and south to the chilly regions of Chile and Patagonia, the cactus (Cactaceae) family can be found (southern end of South America). The largest collection may be in Mexico, but there are also a large number in the western deserts of the United States and at higher elevations in the Cordilleras of Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina.

The majority of succulents are native to milder, semi-desert regions of the planet (Mexico, South Africa). Some (such as sedums and sempervivums) are native to cooler regions where they thrive on sunny, rocky ledges and slopes. Although there are many succulents around the world, not all succulents are desert plants. They can be found on mountains, in jungles, and next to bodies of water. Succulents can be found in semi-arid parts of North and South America, Asia, and Africa, but many also live in rain forests. Succulents can be found in the mountains where they can survive inclement weather, strong winds, and poor soil. Aeonium is a succulent native to Africa, the Canary and Madeira Islands; Agave is a succulent native to the Americas; Aloe is a succulent native to Africa, the Mediterranean, and Atlantic islands; Cotyledon is a succulent native to semi-arid regions of Africa; Crassula is a succulent native to mostly Africa; Dudleya is a succulent native to coastal California and Mexico; Faucaria is a succulent native to South Africa; Sempervivum: North Africa, Asia Minor, and Central and Southern Europe.