When To Repot Succulent

Evergreen succulents have always captured my heart. Succulents are low maintenance plants that thrive in containers because to their unusual forms and thick leaves; I have a large collection of these well-liked varieties.

Repotting succulents every two years is a good general rule of thumb, if only to give them access to new, fertile soil. The beginning of a succulent’s growing season is the optimal time to repot it because it provides the plant its best chance of surviving. My gardeners, Ryan and Wilmer, took advantage of the snowy weather earlier this week to repot many succulent plants and propagate a variety of cuttings. Here are some pictures of the steps we took.

In times of drought, succulents, sometimes known as fat plants, store water in their fleshy leaves, stems, or stem-root systems. Because of their eye-catching shapes, succulents are frequently planted as attractive plants.

I needed to repot a few of the succulents in my collection either they had outgrown their pots or I wanted to relocate them into more attractive clay containers.

He stamps my name and the year the pot was produced on the reverse side. When I host big events in my home, they invariably look fantastic.

To aid in drainage, a clay shard is placed over the hole. Additionally, I like using clay pots because they permit adequate aeration and moisture to reach the plant via the sides.

We always keep the shards from broken pots; it’s a fantastic method to use those parts again.

Wilmer carefully takes a succulent from its pot without damaging any of the roots.

Wilmer then conducts a meticulous test to determine if the pot is the proper size for the plant. He picks a pot just a hair bigger than the plant’s original container.

Prills are the name for osmocote particles. A core of nutrients composed of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium is covered by the prill’s beige shell.

For the finest drainage, we mix equal parts of sand, perlite, and vermiculite for succulents. The correct soil mixture will also aid in promoting rapid root growth and provide young roots with quick anchoring.

Wait a few days before watering the succulents after repotting to give them time to become used to the new soil.

Wilmer shifts to the following plant. This one too need a little maintenance attention. He picked up any fallen leaves.

In order to promote new development, Wilmer lightly pruned the roots after manually loosening the root ball.

Wilmer inserted the plant into the pot after adding some Osmocote and a little amount of potting soil.

The pale blue-gray leaves of Echevaria runyonii ‘Topsy turvy’ curve upward, are prominently inversely keeled on the bottom surface, and have leaf tips that point inward toward the center of the plant.

Echeverias are among the most alluring succulents, and plant aficionados greatly respect them for their brilliant colors and lovely rosette shapes.

An aeonium is a succulent with rosette-like leaves that grows quickly. Aeonium is a varied genus that includes little or medium-sized plants, stemless or shrub-like, and plants that favor sun or shade.

Succulents should be placed on a table so that they can get enough of natural light even when the sun isn’t shining directly on their pots.

Moreover, propagation is fairly simple. Here, Ryan uses sharp pruners to cut a three to four-inch portion of stem off the mother plant.

There should be about a half-inch of stem showing. A handful of them are ready to be planted here.

Ryan provides plenty of space for the plants. There will be plenty to use in mixed urns during the summer if all of these take root and grow into succulent plants. Four to six weeks following planting, new growth should start to show, at which point each plant should be repotted independently.

Inside my main greenhouse, all of my priceless plant collections are kept on long, sliding tables. They all have such lovely looks. Which succulents are your favorites? Please share your feedback in the spaces below.

How do you tell when to repotted a succulent?

Succulents are a favorite among home gardeners because to their distinctive colors, odd shapes, and low maintenance requirements.

Succulents are low maintenance, but that doesn’t mean you should plant them and leave them alone. There will probably come a point when your succulent requires a little more care in addition to making sure it gets the right amount of water and sunlight. Your succulent will eventually need to be repotted in order to give it a suitable environment in which to develop and flourish.

Continue reading for four reasons to repot succulents if you’re unsure whether or not yours does.

Roots are growing through the bottom of the pot

Do you notice white roots clogging the drainage holes in the container when you turn your succulent over? It’s time to repot your succulents if the answer is yes. It’s definitely time to repot if roots are the cause of your pot becoming unsteady. A decent rule of thumb is to leave about a 1/2-inch space around the pot’s edge and between your succulents (if you’re using more than one plant in a pot). Although you want to give your succulent some breathing space, a pot that is too large will actually slow down its growth. Additionally, make sure it has drainage holes. Drill a few holes into the bottom if there aren’t any. If you don’t want to drill holes in your pots, adding a layer of stones, like our Hydro stones, in the bottom of your pot is a fantastic alternative drainage method.

The soil dries out too fast

Have you ever noticed that after watering your succulent, the soil is completely dry again after a few hours? This is a clue that your succulent needs to be repotted because the potting soil is no longer suitable. Succulents want soil that drains easily, but they also require soil that remains damp long enough for the roots to absorb the liquid. Make sure to get the best potting medium for your plants when you repot succulents because of inadequate soil. Succulent soil and perlite, both of which are available at your neighborhood garden center, should be mixed in a ratio of 1:1.

Your succulents are top heavy

Your prized succulents need to be replanted if they are leaning or tipping over, which is an evident symptom. This does not necessarily imply that they require a larger pot, though! Some varieties of succulents grow tall while maintaining shallow root systems. Therefore, even though the roots of your succulent are content in its current container, you must repot it due to the top’s weight. In this case, you simply need a heavier pot—no need to acquire a bigger one. Use a hefty clay container or large stones in the bottom of a lighter pot to add weight when repotting your succulents.

Your succulent looks unhealthy

Have you observed that the once-plush and luscious leaves of your succulent are now limp, shriveling, or yellowing? These are symptoms of a sick plant, therefore it’s time to identify the issue and perhaps repot your succulents. If your succulent receives adequate water and light, then you should check for pests, disease, and rot as potential offenders. Examine the leaves of your succulent; if no issues are there, take the plant out of the pot and check the roots. Cut the roots back to where they seem healthy if you notice a problem with them. Repot your succulent after that in a clean container with new soil. Hopefully, your succulent plant will recover quickly after being re-potted.

After purchasing, do I need to repot my succulents?

Do you repot your plant after purchasing it from the store, or do you leave it in the same pot indefinitely? In fact, repotting your newly acquired plants as soon as you can is a smart idea.

Why repeating is a wise concept is as follows:

  • Put that plant in a well-draining potting mix made for succulents and cacti. Succulents and cacti shouldn’t grow in potting soil that retains too much water, which happens to be the case frequently. The plants’ long-term health will be ensured by removing them from the nursery soil and placing them in a more suitable one.
  • When repotting, you can give the plant a closer look to check on its health. To determine whether the plant’s root system is healthy, you can inspect it. If necessary, you can also remove any dead or decaying roots. Dead or dried leaves can also be removed.
  • You can also look inside the plant for insects and pests that might be there and could contaminate your other plants if ignored. To prevent the infestation from spreading to your other plants, treat and isolate the plant as soon as you notice pests there.
  • You can select a better pot or planter. Choosing a pot or container to house the plants in is one of the things I enjoy most about repotting. A container that is a few inches larger than the nursery pot it was originally planted in is ideal so that the plant has space to grow but is not so large that you run the risk of the plant spending too much time in moist soil. It’s acceptable for some folks to reuse the same nursery pot, but you can also get creative with your selections.

When should succulents be replanted?

No, is the response. When a plant is dormant, it is still alive but not actively growing. Repotting them at risk could interfere with their growth cycle and do some damage to your succulents. Since most succulents become dormant in the summer or the winter, spring and fall are ideal times to undertake some repotting. Repotting winter-dormant succulents in the spring will give them time to adjust to the new pot and soil before growth season, whereas repotting summer-dormant succulents in the fall.

To ensure the soil is new and rich and that the plant has adequate room to grow, you should typically repot your succulents every two years. Another vital aspect you should consider is timing. Repotting should be done during the plant’s active growth period, which is typically spring or summer, to minimize damage to the plant and increase its chances of surviving.

Are big pots required for succulents?

Succulents should be planted in pots that are about 10% broader than the plants themselves. Choose the shallow pot whenever the choice is between a deep or shallow pot. The pot’s depth should be 10% greater than the plant’s depth.

Let’s clarify using instances from real life:

  • Grab a 2.5 (the best option) to 4 inch pot (the exact maximum size) for optimal outcomes if you have a 2 inch succulent.
  • Grab a 4.5 (the best option) to 6 inch pot (the exact maximum size) for optimal results if you have a 4 inch succulent.

Succulents, do they outgrow their pots?

Regular pruning of succulents can help keep them from rotting, promote new growth, and prolong their healthy lives. Find out here when and how to prune your succulents!

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Although it might seem obvious, people are frequently taken aback when their densely planted succulent arrangement starts to seem unkempt. Although they tend to grow slowly, succulents eventually outgrow their containers and may even require frequent upkeep.

There are a few things that will make the process of pruning and caring for succulents considerably easier. Stay to the very end so you can learn about my “secret weapon to make an arrangement appear new again.”

Your succulent arrangements can benefit from a little sprucing up in the spring and fall. I strongly advise cleaning up and pruning in the spring.

But I’ve discovered that in the fall, it’s important to keep your plans as intact as you can. Even while you should still tidy up, get rid of any debris, and dead leaves, spring is often the best time to transplant, behead, and propagate.

Don’t worry if you don’t understand what some of stuff implies. In this post, I’ll show you everything.

My succulent died after being replanted; why?

Transplant shock is the cause of your succulent’s death after being replanted. The stress of a new environment can cause succulents to droop, turn yellow, brown, or black, and eventually die back when they are repotted because of the contrast in the soil medium, moisture levels, and lighting conditions.

Succulents are adaptive and develop adapted to a certain set of conditions, so when they are unexpectedly repotted or relocated to a different location, they frequently show indications of stress.

Succulents may be repotted in ordinary potting soil, right?

I’ll address some of the most prevalent queries concerning succulent soil in this section. Ask your question in the comments section below if you can’t find it here.

Can you use regular potting soil for succulents?

For succulents, you could probably use ordinary potting soil. It might work quite well, especially if you frequently forget to water your plants or if they are small. However, make sure the soil thoroughly dries out in between waterings to prevent them from rotting.

What happens if you plant succulents in regular potting soil?

Succulents planted in normal potting soil run the danger of being overwatered. Your succulents may quickly decay if the soil absorbs too much moisture.

What is the difference between potting soil and succulent soil?

The components and consistency of succulent soil and regular potting soil are different. Succulent dirt is permeable and created to drain very rapidly, unlike regular potting soil, which is composed of organic ingredients that hold onto moisture.

Making my own potting soil helps me save a ton of money, plus my succulents thrive in it. Your succulents will flourish now that you are aware of the ideal soil to use and have my formula for creating your own.