When To Plant Propagated Succulents

Succulents can also grow from solitary leaves. Succulent cultivars with fleshy, plump leaves that are simple to remove function well with this technique. Leaf propagation spares less of the “mother” plant and each leaf can create numerous little plants, even though it will take much longer to produce a full-sized plant. Getting a quality leaf cutting is crucial, much like with stem cuttings. Although they must split from the plant at the base of the stem, leaves can be wiggled off of a plant. Kremblas advises caution, saying, “Be sure to reach all the way down to where the leaf joins the stem, as a broken leaf will not propagate.” And make sure to select a leaf that is firm, plump, and limp-free.

Leaf cuttings should be allowed to callus and need partial sun to grow, just like stem cuttings. Leaf cuttings should be placed on top of a thin layer of succulent potting soil (not buried), and they should be misted with water to keep them wet. The leaf cuttings will start to grow little “pup” plants in about three weeks. The mother leaves will start to wilt and drop off after eight weeks, at which point your pups are ready to be planted.

How long do propagated succulents take to develop roots?

Succulents can be propagated in water, but doing so goes against the ideal growing circumstances for these plants. Start your leaves and cuttings in shallow planting trays or tiny containers packed with potting soil for the best outcomes. Succulents can be grown in individual containers without having to transplant them right away.

Follow these easy steps once planting day arrives and your leaf or stem cuttings have callused:

1. Get your planting trays or containers ready. Use a coarse, quick-draining potting mix made for succulents and cacti and gently moisten it. 2 Make planting holes with a little stick.

2. Add a little RootBoost Rooting Hormone to a serving dish. When pouring, only utilize what you’ll need and discard the remainder.

3. Cut one piece at a time. Wet the cutting stem or leaf base before dipping it into the dish of rooting hormone. Completely round the stem or leaf base. Get rid of any extra rooting powder by shaking.

4. Carefully tuck leaves or stems into the rooting powder so it doesn’t fall out. The potting mix should then be carefully pressed around the cuttings.

  • Insert the base at an angle just below the soil line to accommodate leaves. Put curled leaves in an upwards-curving position. (On that side, the new tiny plant grows.)
  • Insert the bottom half of the stem into the potting mix so that it covers at least two bare nodes when taking stem cuttings.

5. Wait until roots start to form before watering. Once the dirt has dried, give it a good watering before repeating the process. The majority of succulent leaf and stem cuttings should root in two to three weeks, while rooting times might vary greatly. The fastest-rooting cuttings are those from stem tips.

6. After the roots have taken hold, transplant your new succulents from trays to tiny containers. Use the same kind of potting soil as you did previously. Be careful not to disrupt young, delicate roots.

Can you put succulent cuttings directly into the ground?

Aeoniums can grow enormous and get “weary,” and the best course of action is to remove them and transplant some cuttings. Make sure the offcuts from pruning succulents like aeoniums are long enough to allow them to stand upright when replanted.

  • Starting with the tips, trim the stem, leaving at least 15–20 centimeters of stem.
  • After removing the parent plant, set the cuttings aside. These plants have relatively shallow roots, making it simple to pull them out of the ground.
  • About 20 cm of a trench should be dug, into which the cuttings should be placed and then backfilled to support them.
  • In the summer, the cuttings can be planted straight in the ground. For about a week, don’t water the cuttings to let the base dry up. Before planting them during the cooler months, let them sit out of the ground for a week.
  • The cuttings will begin to take root in about a month, and then the tops of the cuttings will begin to grow.

Leaf cuttings can be used to multiply Pachyveria. By removing a lower leaf, you can tell if the plant will grow from leaf cuttings. It might be able to produce new plants if it comes off without damaging anything. The leaf won’t grow if it breaks, creating a “fleshy cut.”

  • Prepare a tray with a combination of succulent and cactus.
  • Starting at the base and working outward, carefully remove the leaves while holding the rosette by the stem. You may also plant this rosette as a cutting, so leave a few leaves on it.
  • Make sure there is enough of airflow around the leaves as you arrange them on top of the soil. Make sure the dish-side up is towards the bud (where the leaf joined the stem), which should be left above the soil.
  • The bud end will begin to develop a small rosette cluster in two to three weeks. As the roots will grow from this end, make sure to maintain it close to the ground.
  • The buds can be removed from the tray and placed in a container or planted directly into the ground after they are big enough to pluck out (and have many leaves).

When should a succulent puppy be repotted?

Taking an active, healthy leaf from a mature succulent plant and utilizing it to establish a new plant is known as “propagating with leaf cuttings.” Because the leaves of succulents with fleshy, plump leaves, like echeveria, are simple to snap off cleanly, this method of propagation works well with them.

While some leaves may simply pop off with a little tug, others could necessitate the use of a sharp knife. Take a healthy leaf from the plant’s base with clean hands or a sterile knife, making sure to remove the full, undamaged leaf.

After being removed, allow the leaf to recover for about four days in a warm, well-lit place so that the wound can callus over. When the leaf has calloused, prepare a fresh planter with soil, fill it with water, and set the callused leaf on top of the soil for multiplication.

When the earth is dry, spritz your leaves with a spray bottle. Keep them warm, in a room with lots of light, but out of direct sunlight. They must be kept warm and moist.

Little roots and leaves will start to emerge after around three weeks! A succulent may need a few months to grow large enough to be replanted (photos above are after about 8 weeks). When the leaf eventually gets brown and falls off, you’ll know it’s time. This indicates that the succulent no longer requires the leaf because it has consumed all of its nutrients.

How can water from propagating succulents be transferred to the soil?

It is strongly advised to wait until the cutting has at least an inch-long root or the mother leaf has begun to dry up before leaving it to air-dry on a paper towel for approximately a day or two if you wish to transfer or transplant your succulents from water to soil. Remember that water roots are far more delicate than soil roots, so handle them carefully and acclimate them to soil gradually.

When the roots are completely dry, gently bury your succulent in unfertilized cactus soil and place it in a spot with only bright, indirect light. Giving your succulents direct sunlight at this time is not advised because they are still delicate. &nbsp

From this point on, it is advised to water your succulent on a regular basis. Every two weeks, a thorough soak would do.

Watch this video to learn about succulent water propagation:

Watch this little video to learn how to avoid four mistakes while cultivating succulents.

See some of the most frequently asked questions about propagating succulents and cacti in this little video.

Why is it unlawful to propagate some succulents?

With a plant patent, you have just purchased the right to utilize that plant. It is not permitted for you to spread it in any form.

You can’t actually take cuttings, trim your patented plant, or propagate it asexually, believe it or not.

However, boosting sexual reproduction, or pollination, would actually increase your earnings.

You see, when plants A and B sexually reproduce, they don’t create more of either plant. It produces plant C.

That is significant in the horticultural industry as well! You have consumed every single gala apple that has ever come from the “same” tree. The original gala tree supplied the branches that were used to graft gala apples onto other apple plants. Because it was pollinated by a blossom that wasn’t a gala apple, if you ever planted a seed from a gala apple it would grow into something similar but distinct from a gala.

All of that may seem convoluted, but the simple version is that pollination results in a completely new plant (which you could patent if you so desired!).

Why are the succulents I propagated dying?

Cuttings from succulent stems won’t take root if

  • Before being planted in soil, the cuttings weren’t given a chance to scab or dry out.
  • Either the growing medium has insufficient drainage or the improper sort of soil was employed.
  • Overwatering or an extended period of damp soil led to decay before roots could take root.
  • The stems dried out and eventually died off due to underwatering or very dry soil.
  • The soil dries out too quickly and burns stem cuttings before roots have a chance to form due to excessive heat or sun exposure.
  • propagating in the incorrect time of year or when dormant.

The majority of people should typically start noticing rooting in three to six weeks. If by then you haven’t noticed any roots forming, it might be because of one or more of the aforementioned factors.

Are there Succulent Species that Won’t Propagate Through Stems?

Stem cuttings can be used to multiply the majority of succulents. There are some species that cannot be multiplied by stems, including:

  • Agaves
  • Aloes
  • Hens with chicks, or Sempervivums
  • Haworthias

Instead of using leaf or stem cuttings for reproduction, the majority of the aforementioned species produce pups or offsets.

Does the length of the stem cuttings matter?

The stem cuttings’ length or size don’t really matter. Getting cuttings from a healthy plant and during its active growing season is very important. In this manner, you can be sure to achieve more success more quickly.

How frequently should you water succulents in propagation?

Succulents may be multiplied, giving you more of what you love. In order to share succulents with friends or because your plants have grown lanky and unsightly, you may need to propagate succulents. Whatever your motivations, we have a tried-and-true method for propagating succulents successfully.

Easy Steps for Propagating a Succulent by Leaf Cutting

1. Cut the desired number of leaves off the stem of the succulent you want to multiply.

  • Where the leaf meets the succulent stem, make a precise snap. Your propagation will go more quickly and easily as a result.
  • For propagation, take many leaf cuttings (see #5).

2. Allow the succulent leaf’s broken end to callus over, mend, and/or dry out.

  • While a week is a fantastic amount of time, you can get away with 2-3 days for small succulent leaves and 4-5 days for larger succulent leaves while you wait for the leaves to heal.
  • The succulent leaves you want to multiply should be placed on a sunny window sill to dry. The sun’s rays expose the leaves, strengthening them with nutrients as well.
  • When natural sunshine is unavailable, LED grow lights are a choice.

3. Place a succulent leaf directly on the soil in a container or on a tray of soil.

  • You should touch the earth with the healed portion of the leaf you are propagating, but not bury it deeply. From there, the newly propagated succulent will grow, and in order to survive, it requires light and space to breathe.
  • Although it would take a lot longer to spread, you could let the leaf develop without soil.

4. Provide water and light to your succulent leaf cuttings for successful propagation.

  • Depending on the temperature and humidity in your home, water succulent leaf cuttings anywhere between two and four times per week. But don’t overwater. While keeping the soil from drying out, soil should be moist but not to the point of having any standing water.
  • It’s ideal to have direct, bright light. Your leaf cuttings may become scorched by too much direct sunlight.

5. Produce several leaves.

  • You’ll probably experience some casualties when propagating succulents. You have a better chance of successfully growing succulents if you follow the procedures of propagation with numerous leaf cuttings.
  • Place a number of leaf cuttings on a tray or large pot filled with potting soil that is lightweight. Here, you can immediately see which leaf cuttings will begin to develop roots and young succulents and are good candidates for propagation and which leaves will begin to shrivel and turn black, making them unsuitable.

6. Be patient and give your leaf cuttings enough time to grow roots, produce offspring, and reproduce.

  • Please take note that leaf cuttings that produce babies but no roots are preferable to leaf cuttings that produce babies but no roots.
  • You can sigh with relief when you notice that the young succulents or pups are growing. When the pups or babies appear, you can tell that they are able to produce their own food through photosynthesis as well as their own leaf systems. A leaf cutting that only grows roots may never give birth to offspring or may take a very long time to do so.
  • You can always pinch or clip off the mother plant leaf once the babies/pups have formed.

7. Plant your just multiplied succulents in pots.

  • Allow your babies or puppies to establish strong roots so that you can repot them into any container you want. If you propagated them in your chosen pot, let them there to continue growing.
  • While propagated succulents are still in their adolescent years, keep providing them with indirect strong light. Direct sunlight will be too harsh.
  • Give your new succulents a nice soak once every two weeks to water them. Don’t overwater once more. Just keep in mind that succulents store water in their leaves and stems, and that too much water around their roots will result in death by root rot.
  • Remove the leaf from the mother plant that was used to propagate the plant, if you haven’t done so before. It has probably already started to shrivel up. The mother leaf remnants will ultimately dry out and fall off if you cut it close to the new plant.

*Special remark Some succulents, such as hoya and kalanchoe, cannot be propagated via leaf cuttings but can instead be done using alternative techniques, such as stem cutting. Later, we’ll talk about those.

Folks, that’s all she wrote! Your succulents that you propagated should be well on their way to developing into mature plants. Good fortune!