When To Plant A Succulent Cutting

Choose a suitable location on your succulent to make the cut. Make a quick, even cut through the succulent’s stem with your pruning shears to separate a cutting. Make sure that there is around 1 inch of stem exposed on the cutting before planting. The bottom leaves of the cutting might need to be removed for this.

Let the Cutting Callous

It is not possible to immediately put the cutting in the ground after it has been taken. Allow the “damaged” stem of the cutting to callous over for 24 hours by setting the cutting aside in a dry place. The stem should be healed and not seem to be “wet” in any regions after 24 hours. It’s now time to plant the cutting.

Plant the Cutting

Put a succulent mix or well-draining soil in a small terracotta or plastic planter. Make a tiny hole in the middle of the soil, and after placing the succulent cutting’s stem there carefully, firm the earth up around it. To prevent rot, make sure the cutting’s lowest leaf is perched just above the surrounding soil.

After planting, avoid watering the cutting. Give the newly planted succulent cutting two or three weeks in a spot with bright, indirect sun.

Begin Watering Once Roots Sprout

It’s crucial to hold off on watering a fresh succulent cutting until the roots have formed, unlike when propagating other plants. Since succulents don’t need much water to begin with, watering a cutting before it has roots might cause the cutting to decompose under the soil very rapidly. Succulent cuttings may go quite a while without water, so don’t worry!

Give the cutting’s top a little push to check for roots after letting it sit for two to three weeks. If there is any resistance, the cutting can now be watered because the roots have started to form. Once the cutting has grown roots, it might need to be watered more frequently than usual succulents until it becomes established. Make sure the top inch of the soil dries out between waterings to prevent overwatering.

Patience, Patience, Patience!

Be patient while you take care of your new plant because succulent cuttings grow slowly. But after a few months after planting, you should start to see fresh growth.

Growing succulent cuttings can be gradually put back into stronger lighting as they become older, eventually reaching the full sun conditions that most succulents enjoy. Remember that succulent cuttings are susceptible to death from excessive affection. Once the soil dries out, they simply require light watering because they thrive on neglect.

Gather Your Succulents To Plant

For this video, we’ll be planting a variety of succulent species using both cuttings and discarded leaves. Amass the materials you want to plant. You can either utilize fallen leaves or cut cuttings from an established plant. If you can’t locate cuttings anywhere else, you can usually find them online and at most florists. Although these are also available on Amazon, I got mine from a vendor on Etsy.

Prepare your succulents for planting.

The most crucial step in this method is preparing your succulents. Make sure you have enough stem to plant in the ground so it can support the plant. Any excess leaves at the stem’s base should be removed. It’s good to leave approximately an inch of the stem exposed for larger cuttings, and you can use less for smaller cuttings.

After that, examine the base of your cutting. The plants ought to have a “callous” on them, which denotes that the plant’s base has dried out. You should wait a few days before planting freshly cut succulents because this forms a few days after the succulent is cut. By letting the cut end dry more quickly on a paper towel or paper bag, you can hasten this process.

Succulents are wonderful because you can also plant their leaves, so hold onto the ones you pulled off the stem. Verify your succulents for any bad components. Any area of the plant that is dark contains rot, which can spread to other areas and ultimately destroy the plant. Simply cutting it will allow you to get rid of the rotten parts.

Mix your soil.

If you aren’t using a pre-made succulent soil mix, you’ll need to prepare your soil so that it will drain effectively and support the growth of your succulent plants. To make the soil drain well, I combine one part potting soil with one part sand. In order to help larger plants become more firmly rooted in the ground, I also prefer to have a supply of tiny rocks nearby.

To fill a pot or tray, pour your soil mixture. I’m repurposing an old baking pan that I can’t bake in as a planting tray.

Plant!

We’ve reached the enjoyable part now! Make a little, inch-deep hole in the ground. After inserting your cutting, fill up the depression with soil.

Make careful to space your cuttings, if you’re planting more than one, roughly 2-3″ apart.

Ensure that your plants receive adequate water. Although succulents don’t often require much water, you may need to water them every 2-4 days while they are developing their roots, depending on how dry the soil becomes. It’s normal for the leaves to initially appear a little dried out because the plant is using its reserves of stored energy to develop new roots. New growth should begin to appear in around four weeks. Change to weekly watering or watering only when the soil is dry once the plants have set their roots and have started to grow.

Admire and Show Off Your Work!

Well done! Show off your incredible craftsmanship and green thumb to all of your friends! These plants will be prepared for repotting if you desire once they have developed roots and begun to grow, which should take around 3 to 6 weeks. They make wonderful Christmas gifts for friends and coworkers when planted in a tiny Mason jar or vibrant pot!

Can succulent cuttings be planted directly in the ground?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.

How long does it take a succulent cutting to fully develop?

The time it takes to propagate a succulent varies based on the type of succulent and the method you utilize. Succulents are fairly simple to grow.

After you propagate a succulent, it often takes two to three weeks or longer for it to begin exhibiting symptoms of new growth.

A succulent won’t begin to grow right away after being propagated, though. You should have patience while your plant is propagating because it could take several weeks before any new growth appears.

The kind of succulent you are propagating and the method you use will determine how long it takes.

  • Cuttings
  • Leaves
  • Offsets
  • Seeds
  • Water

How Long Do Succulents Take To Grow From Cuttings?

Because they grow quickly, succulents are a common plant to reproduce from cuttings.

Root development and new leaf growth typically take 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, when growing succulents from stem cuttings.

It’s probably big enough to move to a new pot at this time. The original leaf changing color and dropping off is typically a sign that the new plant is prepared for potting.

The cuttings should all root fairly rapidly if kept in strong light, and once established roots have grown, they should all start producing new succulent leaves.

Depending on the size of your cutting, it may take longer or less time, but in general, you may begin harvesting baby succulent plants in around 20 weeks.

Even if some of your cuttings could take longer to grow than others, there are no problems with the propagation procedure as a result.

Due to their genetic make-up or other variables like exposure to particular elements or light, some succulents just develop more slowly than others.

Your cuttings should successfully root as long as you keep them out of direct sunshine and give them plenty of water!

How Long Does It Take To Propagate Succulents From Leaves

The amount of water provided and whether or not they are put in direct sunlight are just two of the numerous variables that will affect how long it takes for succulents to form roots.

For instance, whereas Sedum species have thin leaves and can take up to three weeks to establish roots, Aeonium species have thick leaves and form roots in one week.

When propagated from leaves, succulents typically take 1 to 3 weeks to produce roots. A succulent could need a few months to grow to the right size for repotting.

Generally speaking, as soon as the leaf has roots and the succulent is large enough, it’s typically preferable to repot.

While some leaves may quickly take root, it takes a lot longer for a rosette to develop. In certain circumstances, it is preferable to hold off on any repotting until the rosette has developed.

How Long Does It Take To Grow Succulents From Offsets

With offsets, which are miniature replicas of the main plant, succulents can reproduce swiftly and easily.

When reproduced via offsets, the time it takes for succulents to grow roots ranges from 4 to 10 weeks.

Offsets happen when a plant develops so much that its root system starts to encroach on too much area.

Now, just as you would cut a branch from any other tree, the mother plant creates an offshoot that will eventually become an individual.

Succulents are easy to propagate—all you have to do is take the offset from the mother plant. They often attach pretty simply, so this method should be straightforward.

Just be sure to give the offset a separate pot or container so that it can develop on its own.

If you want to grow more succulent plants rapidly, offset propagation offers a quick turnaround.

Simply wait until your offset has established roots, which takes, on average, four weeks, and then repot it into its own pot.

How Long Does It Take To Grow Succulents From Seeds

Dealing with succulent seeds can be challenging. The seedling takes three to six weeks to germinate, and another six months or longer for it to mature.

The method that requires the most time is seed-to-plant propagation. The process of starting the seedlings can be difficult.

It takes perseverance to grow succulents from seeds because it takes around three weeks for the first little shoot to appear.

However, there may still be a long waiting period until they reach adulthood.

The type of succulents you are propagating, the growing environment, and whether you are utilizing hydroponic or conventional techniques all have an impact on how long it takes to cultivate succulents from seed.

Although it takes many months for the seed to germinate and grow into a full plant, the process is often gradual.

How Long Does It Take To Propagate Succulents in Water

Succulent cuttings that are reproduced in water require around two weeks to establish roots and are then prepared for soil transplantation.

When a succulent’s roots begin to grow after being propagated in water, it should be placed in soil.

It will produce more leaves rather than a root system if the succulent is not transplanted, which will make it more challenging for the plant to take nutrients from its surroundings.

When you notice the roots forming, that’s a good sign that the succulent plant is ready to be rooted in the ground.

Until they can be planted permanently, succulents that are propagated in water do best when placed outside on a sunny patio or porch.

It is significant to note that each succulent’s propagation period will vary according on its growth environment, cutting material, quantity of leaves, and water quality.