When Propagating Succulents

  • slicing shears
  • gardening mitts (for handling spiny varieties)
  • a little trowel
  • potting soil for cacti and succulents
  • jars with sufficient drainage holes

Remove Some Leaves or Behead

Take a few leaves at random from your succulent plant, gently twisting each one off the stem without breaking it.

These can be cut off the bottom of the stem, which will be discarded, when it begins to grow lanky.

To remove a specific leaf from a plant, such as a Christmas cactus, you might need to use scissors.

If you’re “beheading,” cut the stem of the plant head cleanly with your scissors or clippers about an inch below the lower leaves.

Plant

When roots start to form, either choose a site in your garden that is ideal for planting or fill well-draining containers of your choosing with potting material.

Sunshine and well-drained soil are ideal for succulent growth. They get paler in the absence of sunlight, and they decompose in excess moisture.

When the sun is less powerful, such as in the early morning or late afternoon, plant in a sunny location.

To lift the cuttings above the edge of your container or garden surface, pile dirt higher. To stabilize the roots, gently tamp the earth down; do not water.

Water and Feed

It’s time to buy a succulent/cactus food at this stage, such as Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food, which is sold on Amazon. administer as directed by the manufacturer.

Succulents can also be propagated via cuttings that are placed on top of potting soil and allowed to callus off so they can root themselves in the soil.

When should I begin succulent propagation?

Taking an active, healthy leaf from a mature succulent plant and utilizing it to establish a new plant is known as “propagating with leaf cuttings.” Because the leaves of succulents with fleshy, plump leaves, like echeveria, are simple to snap off cleanly, this method of propagation works well with them.

While some leaves may simply pop off with a little tug, others could necessitate the use of a sharp knife. Take a healthy leaf from the plant’s base with clean hands or a sterile knife, making sure to remove the full, undamaged leaf.

After being removed, allow the leaf to recover for about four days in a warm, well-lit place so that the wound can callus over. When the leaf has calloused, prepare a fresh planter with soil, fill it with water, and set the callused leaf on top of the soil for multiplication.

When the earth is dry, spritz your leaves with a spray bottle. Keep them warm, in a room with lots of light, but out of direct sunlight. They must be kept warm and moist.

Little roots and leaves will start to emerge after around three weeks! A succulent may need a few months to grow large enough to be replanted (photos above are after about 8 weeks). When the leaf eventually gets brown and falls off, you’ll know it’s time. This indicates that the succulent no longer requires the leaf because it has consumed all of its nutrients.

Do succulents require sunlight while they are being propagated?

Gardeners deal with one of the biggest propagation mistakes: The growth of leaves requires a lot of intense, direct sunshine. That is not the case. Your leaves will scorch in the hot sun. Succulent leaf growth does not require a lot of sunlight. They will perform better if you place them in a light, airy area. Extreme heat or a lot of direct sunlight are not good for puppies.

Additionally, if the succulent does not exhibit new growth near to the leaf, the plant requires more light to grow.

Can succulent cuttings be planted directly in the ground?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.

After water propagation, when can I propagate succulents?

It is strongly advised to wait until the cutting has at least an inch-long root or the mother leaf has begun to dry up before leaving it to air-dry on a paper towel for approximately a day or two if you wish to transfer or transplant your succulents from water to soil. Remember that water roots are far more delicate than soil roots, so handle them carefully and acclimate them to soil gradually.

When the roots are completely dry, gently bury your succulent in unfertilized cactus soil and place it in a spot with only bright, indirect light. Giving your succulents direct sunlight at this time is not advised because they are still delicate. &nbsp

From this point on, it is advised to water your succulent on a regular basis. Every two weeks, a thorough soak would do.

Watch this video to learn about succulent water propagation:

Watch this little video to learn how to avoid four mistakes while cultivating succulents.

See some of the most frequently asked questions about propagating succulents and cacti in this little video.

How can you root succulents the quickest?

So, you may be wondering how to quickly propagate succulents. I can relate to both the joy and frustration of watching a new plant develop.

Since I’ve been growing succulents for a few years, allow me to give you some advice on how to quickly propagate your succulents as well as some alternative techniques you can try.

Stem cuttings are the simplest and quickest method of propagating succulents. If the plant is a fresh cutting from the mother plant, it will already have a strong foundation from which to build its new root system. Another instance is when you cut off the succulent’s top portion because it has been stretched out significantly (etiolation), this stem will likewise give rise to numerous new plantlings (pups). Due to its existing root system, the plant will also have a great possibility of producing more offset and growing quickly.

Always check that the stem cuttings are a respectable size for the plant’s typical size.

According to my experience, I always want to make sure that the succulent has a lot of nodes where the leaves attach to the stem and a lot of leaves in its stem. Once the succulent is put in soil, these stem nodes will form roots, and the leaves will serve as the succulent’s water source until its root system matures.

Why won’t my succulent root?

You recently purchased some gorgeous succulent cuttings from a nursery in your neighborhood, or even better, online with free shipping. The cuttings you purchased are incredibly lovely, and you can’t wait to see them take root, develop, and flourish just as you anticipate!

Sadly, weeks have passed and your succulent cuttings haven’t even the least bit rooted! Now that the succulent cuttings appear dried up, wrinkled, or dying, you’re probably wondering why they aren’t taking root.

Be kind to yourself because this is something that occurs frequently. Rooting succulent cuttings is a challenge for many succulent growers, especially beginners. Especially if you recently purchased these cuttings and they aren’t rooted, it might be really discouraging.

Your succulent cuttings not rooting for a variety of reasons. It can be the result of overwatering, underwatering, insufficient sunlight, a lack of nutrients, improper soil use, or improper potting.

Not to worry! By the time you finish reading this article, you’ll understand exactly why your succulent cuttings aren’t rooted and how to fix the problem.

Should I spray cuttings of succulents?

Because you probably already own one or many succulents, for many people, propagating them can be the simplest method to get started.

If a succulent is starting to get a little leggy, which means the succulent starts to grow long and the leaves become widely separated, remove the lower leaves. Make sure to completely separate the leaf from the stalk. It won’t establish new roots if you rip it.

The only thing left is a succulent perched atop a lengthy stem. To quickly get the succulent to root again, make a cut between the base of the succulent and the stem’s midpoint.

Then, it’s crucial that you allow the ends to callus over and dry out. Your cuttings may rot and perish if you plant them straight in the soil because they will absorb too much moisture. To allow ends to dry, Tiger advises finding a shaded, dry area on the patio or even indoors. Some people want to expose them to the sun, but he claims that doing so will just bake them. Be tolerant. This procedure can take a few days to more than a week.

When the cuttings are dry, set them on top of cactus or succulent soil that drains well and plant them in a position that gets a lot of indirect light. Only water if the leaves seem particularly dry.

Several weeks later, young plants begin to emerge. Using a spray bottle, spritz the plants once daily, being cautious not to drench the soil.

The leaf will ultimately fall off naturally, at which point you can pot up the young succulent.

Why are the succulents I propagated dying?

Cuttings from succulent stems won’t take root if

  • Before being planted in soil, the cuttings weren’t given a chance to scab or dry out.
  • Either the growing medium has insufficient drainage or the improper sort of soil was employed.
  • Overwatering or an extended period of damp soil led to decay before roots could take root.
  • The stems dried out and eventually died off due to underwatering or very dry soil.
  • The soil dries out too quickly and burns stem cuttings before roots have a chance to form due to excessive heat or sun exposure.
  • propagating in the incorrect time of year or when dormant.

The majority of people should typically start noticing rooting in three to six weeks. If by then you haven’t noticed any roots forming, it might be because of one or more of the aforementioned factors.

Are there Succulent Species that Won’t Propagate Through Stems?

Stem cuttings can be used to multiply the majority of succulents. There are some species that cannot be multiplied by stems, including:

  • Agaves
  • Aloes
  • Hens with chicks, or Sempervivums
  • Haworthias

Instead of using leaf or stem cuttings for reproduction, the majority of the aforementioned species produce pups or offsets.

Does the length of the stem cuttings matter?

The stem cuttings’ length or size don’t really matter. Getting cuttings from a healthy plant and during its active growing season is very important. In this manner, you can be sure to achieve more success more quickly.

Prepare the Pot

Cuttings can be grown in a temporary pot while they develop roots, or you can just plant them in a permanent container. In either case, you’ll need a pot with a drainage hole that’s big enough to give each cutting 2 to 3 inches of space.

To shield your succulents from standing water and root rot, fill the container with a grittier, well-draining soil. Cactus/succulent potting soil is typically available at garden centers. Alternatively, you can create your own by mixing 3 parts potting soil with 2 parts coarse, salt-free sand and 1 part perlite or pumice.

Plant the Cuttings

Insert the cut end of a stem 1 to 2 inches into the ground. If the succulent has leaves, you might need to remove a few of them to reveal the stem’s base. The lowest leaves shouldn’t contact the soil; they should rest just above it. To help the cutting stand straight, softly compact the dirt around it.

Remove any necessary leaves from stemmed succulents to expose 1 to 2 inches of stem for planting.

Pick the Right Location

Choose an area with enough of airflow, bright indirect light (not direct outdoor sun), and succulents that are still young. Cuttings require sunshine to develop new roots, but direct sunlight might cause them to quickly dry up. On indoor succulents, good airflow helps avoid gnat and mealy insect infestations.

Water

Cuttings require constant hydration until they can form roots, unlike mature succulents. Water the soil just enough to prevent it from drying up, but not too much that there is standing water. Actual frequency varies depending on humidity and temperature but is often 2-4 times each week.

Care for Rooted Succulents

A very slight pull will reveal whether a cutting has roots after 4-6 weeks. Change to deeper, less frequent watering for succulents with roots. Water just once the soil is completely dry, which takes about 2-4 times each month. If necessary, repot the succulent and relocate it gradually to the right lighting. Don’t increase light exposure for 1-2 weeks to give the plant time to adjust. Maintain your succulent’s care, and in the upcoming months, keep an eye out for above-ground development.