What To Do With Succulents

Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

What can you do with succulents?

For those who enjoy a few pots of greenery on the desk at work or dispersed throughout sunny parts of the home, this ease of care is unquestionably beneficial. You’ve probably heard that succulents can enhance humidity in your dry house or office and assist remove harmful toxins from the air. This additional moisture relieves dry, irritated skin. Additionally, it can shield you from the common cold, dry cough, and sore throats.

Succulents can help with a variety of other medical conditions. The majority of us are aware that aloe vera juice and gel are marketed for reducing inflammation, particularly in the digestive tract. Parts of the yucca plant are also said to help with inflammation in other areas of the body. These plants’ saponins and other antioxidants are used to treat arthritis pain. To produce a tea for this use, boil yucca roots.

Sometimes succulents can help ease the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema. Due to the skin’s inability to fight bacterial infections, adult cases of childhood eczema frequently result in rash and itching. Succulents serve a dual purpose in helping to treat eczema because low humidity can occasionally bring on the symptoms.

Agave juice lessens pain from a number of diseases while accelerating the healing process. In addition to being used to make tequila, it is also used to treat toothache pain, stomach disorders, and other conditions that benefit from its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and vitamin-rich characteristics. Everyone should minimize their oral agave consumption, especially pregnant ladies.

How can I use a lot of succulents?

Try planting a rain gutter garden if you want to find a way to fit plenty of succulents in a tiny area. They are substantial, reasonably priced, don’t require a lot of soil, and offer room for succulents.

These would look fantastic along a fence, under a window, on the side of a shed, or on the balcony railing.

After trimming the rain gutter to the desired size, finish each end with an end cap. Create drainage holes all the way to the bottom. Caulk can be used to close the opening between the gutter and end cap.

Fill the gutter with freely draining dirt after the caulk has dried and been secured to the wall. then start having fun! In the rain gutter, arrange your succulents however you like.

What are some uses for little succulents?

The majority of small succulents are young plants or cuttings that haven’t grown to maturity.

They can also be wired or glued to the chosen arrangement, be it a wood planter, a wall art piece, a wreath arrangement, etc.

Do Mini Succulents Grow?

Yes. Mini succulents grow, although they don’t do so quickly at first. Do anticipate that after they reach a certain size, they will grow more quickly until they eventually outgrow their pots. I’ll use this echeveria and haworthia (zebra plant) as an example to demonstrate the development of their growth in this tiny pot.

They were simultaneously planted in this tiny container by me. These are all young plants. The haworthias were offspring of the mother plant, but the echeveria was multiplied from a single leaf. Here is how they developed throughout the previous year:

They became sunburnt quite soon, and I lost the one on the far left. In order to keep it from drying out, I moved it to a more shaded area and watered it more frequently—roughly once a week.

How Fast Do Mini Succulents Grow?

Their growth is slowed down when placed in a compact container since they are unable to stretch out and thrive. Depending on how well they are taken care of, micro succulents planted closely and compactly in a small area or pot can remain there for several months or even years. The type of soil they are in, hydration methods, and illumination all have a significant impact on how they develop.

The kind of plant you are utilizing also matters. Growing plants from cuttings, tiny plants, or leaves generally takes longer than growing established plants. Some succulents, regardless of where they are put, have a propensity to grow huge.

Aeoniums are one illustration of this. Aeoniums tend to grow upward and their rosettes spread outward, making them a poor choice for small arrangements. The haworthias and echeverias I displayed above are excellent options because they don’t grow as quickly or take up a lot of space. Sedums are another excellent option because they are resilient and adaptable to many growth environments.

When kept in a small space, they also continue to be little. Water your plants as little as possible—just spritz or spray them to keep them from drying out—if you want them to stay little. The plants’ growth ought to be slowed by this.

Succulents are incredibly resilient plants that can endure harsh environments for a very long period. Remember that many of the miniature succulent plants used in these arrangements are cuttings or baby plants, which are less hardy than mature plants. As a result, be ready to lose one or two of them during the process.

How Long Can Mini Succulents Stay in Small Pots?

Mini succulents can live for a few weeks, a few months, or even years in tiny pots. It all relies on the kind of plants you’re utilizing and how well you’re taking care of them. They will eventually start to outgrow the small container as they develop more.

If you maintain the plant in the same pot and don’t move it, you may start to notice that it appears unhappy or that it is spilling out of the pot. If the pot has holes, you might even see roots emerging from the holes. These are all indications that they require repotting because they have outgrown the pot.

Just remove it from the pot and repotted it in a bigger container. Trim the plant to keep it small and remove little portions to propagate and grow the plant elsewhere if you don’t feel like repotting the entire thing. Your aesthetic preferences for the plant are entirely up to you.

You can carefully remove the plant and replant it in soil if the plants aren’t in soil but you start to see roots forming.

How Big Do They Get?

While development may be stifled when kept in a small pot, the plant should be able to continue developing and eventually reach its full growth potential once it is replanted somewhere else and given enough opportunity to grow. It will be more difficult for the plant to grow to its full potential if it is kept in the same container, though. You must inevitably repot the plant into a larger container if you want to see it flourish.

Once the other plants have outgrown it, the fun thing is that you can choose new miniature succulents to put in your miniature garden.

How to Plant Your Own Mini Succulent Garden

Mine tend to persist longer when they are planted in soil, therefore I like to do that. Because they are initially quite slow growers and will remain little for a very long time, I also appreciate using very small plants developed from cuttings, frequently leaf cuttings. I gently plant them with cactus soil mix mixed with perlite for additional drainage once they are well-rooted and established.

Additionally, I enjoy using planters with drainage holes. Given their small size, it is important to keep these plants out of the full sun to avoid sun damage and sunburn.

If you are unable to plant them in soil, you can secure the plants using wire or adhesive and coir or sphagnum moss. The plant shouldn’t be harmed by the glue.

To give these two plants more room to grow and spread out, I divided them and placed each in an own pot.

They could have continued to develop in the same pot for a few more months or maybe a year, but I put them in separate pots to hasten the process.

How Long Do Mini Succulents Live?

It depends on their surroundings and the kind of care they receive. Generally speaking, plants survive longer when planted in soil as opposed to being adhered to or set in sphagnum moss or coir materials. Their roots will have something to grip onto and secure themselves after they are put in soil.

The ability of a plant to absorb water from the soil is improved when the plant becomes rooted in comparison to when the roots are loose, fastened, or linked to something. The soil they are placed in provides them with some nutrition as well. They can survive for many months or even years in the same pot or container with the right care.

How to Care for Mini Succulents and Keep Them Alive

A tiny succulent garden requires sufficient sunlight, the ideal soil type, and appropriate watering procedures.

Because of their diminutive size, the containers carry less water and dry out more quickly. Additionally, because the plants I’m using are young and were produced from cuttings, they could need a little more water than mature plants. When watering, I prefer to use a squirt bottle or a spray bottle and direct the water toward the earth rather than the plant’s top.

To prevent rotting, you want the water to reach the plant’s roots rather than its body or leaves. I water once a week on average. Remember that I have my plants outside and that I live in an extremely dry area.

You might not need to water as frequently if you reside in a humid environment. Before watering, it is advisable to examine the soil for moisture, especially if unsure. To see if moisture meters are useful, you can investigate them. Moisture meters gauge the air’s and soil’s humidity levels.

Succulents prefer a potting mixture with good drainage. They dislike spending too much time on soggy ground. This might encourage root rot. In addition to using effective watering methods, the type of soil you employ is crucial.

Select a soil that drains well, or amend the soil to improve drainage. I find that using a regular cactus potting mix and adding perlite for better drainage is a simple solution. Please click on Best Soil and Fertilizers For Succulents to read more about the best soil to use for succulents.

With the exception of some sedums, little succulents cannot stand severe heat or direct sunlight. Since many miniature succulents are the result of cuttings, they require some shade from the sun. Avoid direct sunlight, especially the harsh afternoon sun, but make sure there is plenty of bright light.

Sunlight in the morning is less strong and more tolerable. As a general guideline, give the plants 5 to 6 hours of sunlight each day or artificial light to see the best results.

Fertilizing is not really important for succulents because they don’t actually eat much, especially if you want to keep the plants small. I would only think about fertilizing small succulents if they were in a vase without soil and you had them for a while. To provide the plants with nutrients that they would not otherwise receive from the soil or potting mix, you can think about fertilizing them.

This can be accomplished by incorporating diluted fertilizer—about 1/4–1/2 strength—into the water you’ll use to spritz or water the plants. By doing this, you are giving the plants the nutrients they require to flourish. Again, unless you’ve had them for a while—roughly a year—this is really not essential.

Over the years, I’ve kept a lot of little succulents in tiny pots all over my home, and they have done extremely nicely.

They really don’t differ much from other succulent plants in terms of care and maintenance. They will be OK if you give them some tender loving care but, for the most part, leave them alone. That, at least, has served me well. Congratulations and happy gardening!

What stores sell miniature succulents? For suggestions on where to get these and succulent cuttings online, visit my resource page.

About

You’ve come to the correct location if, like me, you enjoy succulents. This website is a repository for the succulent-growing knowledge I’ve accumulated over the years and am still learning. Although I am by no means an expert on succulents and cacti, this website was created as a result of years of hard work, love, and many mistakes and learning opportunities.

How are succulents maintained?

Succulents may not need much attention, but they do need a few essentials to survive:

  • 1. Provide plenty sunlight. Succulents require adequate light—at least six hours each day of direct sunlight. Maintaining succulents outside can be quite simple. However, if you have a succulent indoors, you must keep it in direct sunlight near a window. A plant that is slanting toward the light is not receiving enough sunlight, yet a plant with burnt areas on its leaves is receiving too much direct sunshine.
  • 2. Use proper water. Depending on the season, succulents might have different water needs. Succulents should be irrigated if their soil dries completely during the growing season, but excess water should be avoided. When a succulent’s roots have time to dry out in between waterings, its lifespan is increased. In the chilly winter months, succulent plants go dormant and require less water. Only water your succulent as often as necessary because overwatering the soil is one of the main reasons of most development problems.
  • 3. Use the proper soil and pot combination. The appropriate container and potting soil can make all the difference, whether you’re growing your own succulents or purchasing one from a nursery. Your succulent planter needs to include a drainage hole if it is going to be an outdoor succulent. Proper drainage allows moisture to escape, allowing the soil and root systems to dry and prevent rot. Use well-draining soil instead of standard dirt if you have an indoor succulent. It is coarser than regular soil, enabling more air to pass through and encouraging evaporation rather than requiring to be drained. To increase aeration, perlite and pumice can be added to some potting mixtures.
  • 4.Remember to fertilize. The periodic fertilizing is beneficial for even low maintenance desert plants. To give your succulents a boost, use a diluted, water-soluble all-purpose fertilizer a couple times a year. Although it’s not entirely required, if you notice that your soil needs some help, add a little fertilizer.
  • 5. Examine your plant life. Pest hazards are more likely to affect a succulent indoors than outside. Make sure your plants are periodically checked for gnats or mealy pests. These insects are a sign that your plants are receiving too much water or fertilizer. Mealy bugs can lay hundreds of eggs and consume the plant juices that serve as their host, gradually harming your plant. Rubbish alcohol can be sprayed on your succulent’s leaves or soil to effectively kill mealy bugs and their eggs. Check the leaves and soil of the succulent before bringing it home from the nursery to make sure no bugs are present.