What To Do With Leggy Succulents

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When cultivated in the right lighting conditions, succulents adore the sun and thrive. However, you’ve probably cultivated or observed a lanky, stretched-out succulent. In the area you have, these lanky or etiolated succulents aren’t getting the proper amount of light.

Not just succulent indoor plants experience this behavior. You may have seen how your plant stretches to reach as close to the sun as it can by bending toward it. As they extend toward the sun, succulents get taller and spread their leaves farther apart.

The compact shape of etiolated succulents won’t return, but you can give them a trim and grow additional succulents from the cuttings.

How to disassemble the plant and begin reproducing it in order to try again is demonstrated in this video by Laura from Garden Answer.

  • Clear the foliage. Cut the roots and wholesome leaves from the succulent’s bottom half with pruners or by snapping them off. Get a break that is as spotless as you can to promote new growth. Get rid of your leaf if it tears. Up to a little bit after halfway up, remove leaves. To understand how to cut the stem and transplant it with the remaining rosette at the top, see to step three.
  • Dry the leaves. After removal, let the leaves dry for a few days or until the raw ends have calloused.
  • Replant the stem. New roots will be able to sprout if the stem is planted farther below where the leaves were removed. Simply clip the stem 1-2 inches from the plant’s base if it is too long for the pot. It’s alright if you have no stem at all. Simply bury the rosette in the ground to prevent it from falling out.
  • Prepare to expand. A tray, saucer, or other container containing Espoma’s Organic Cactus mix should have dried leaves on top of it. Avoid burying leaves in the ground. Put the container in a location that will shield it from direct sunlight.
  • Spray the ground until it is damp but not soaked. When the soil seems dry to the touch, rehydrate it.
  • Wait. There will be new baby roots that appear in about a month.
  • Replant. You can replant your propagated succulents once they have established roots. Put them on display in a recycled planter.
  • The roots should be examined every six months to determine whether you need to transfer your plants to a larger pot. Espoma’s Cactus can be used to routinely feed your succulents. For optimal results, use liquid plant food.

Can you make a succulent grow taller?

The majority of succulents are graceful low-growing plants that neatly tuck into cracks in rockeries, flower beds, pots, and between pavement stones. Although succulent pruning is not typically necessary, it is a simple procedure that can be used on plants that grow long and lose the compact character that makes them so coveted. Understanding how to trim a leggy succulent can help you get the plant back to the size you want while also giving you plant material for another one of these resilient, simple plants.

When you complain that your plant is too tall, you should regulate it. This could be caused by blooms, leaves, or stalks, and the plant may end up seeming smaller or not fitting into its original location. The type of plant you are growing will determine what to do if your succulents get too tall.

Plants go through a process known as etioliation when they are grown indoors or in other low light environments. The plant is stretching upward to catch more light, which causes the stem to lengthen. Transferring the plant to a southern exposure is the straightforward answer. But that leggy party is still left after this. Fortunately, it is possible to top leggy succulent plants, which will remove the excessively tall portion and encourage the growth of new, more compact shoots.

How may leggy succulents be pruned?

  • The plant should be cut, leaving approximately an inch or so of stem at the base.
  • For a day or two, or longer if your area is humid, leave the stem cuttings in a dry location away from direct sunshine to dry. Launder and seal the wound. To hasten the rooting process, it is optional to dip the cuttings in rooting hormone.
  • Put the cuttings in a well-draining potting mix after the cut has healed. Perlite and a cactus mixture are my preferred combinations (1:1 solution). You can find soil and soil amendments here.
  • Every few days or whenever the soil gets dry, mist or water the area.
  • The stem cuttings usually take two weeks or longer to root.
  • Avoid direct sunshine and keep watering every few days or whenever the soil starts to feel dry.
  • When the plant reaches maturity, increase sunshine while reducing watering.

The portion of the plant from which the cuttings were taken will keep expanding and generating new growth. Rarely, the base will stop expanding and eventually disappear. However, if this occurs, hopefully you have already grown new plants from the stem cuttings.

Decide where to cut the plant. In order to conveniently put the plant you are cutting into soil and propagate it, you should ideally have at least half an inch of stem on the bottom of the plant.

When you cut the plant, make sure to salvage as many of the roots as possible. These already have roots sprouting, so they will thrive when replanted in soil.

How do I get a bushier succulent?

Any plant’s other buds will be able to grow, sometimes with astonishing vigor, if the top is pruned removed. As a result, the plant becomes bushier as each lower bud develops into a new, smaller shoot. By making a cut slightly above a bud that is oriented in the desired direction, you can control the growth.

How should long succulent stems be used?

Who doesn’t adore a succulent garden? Nowadays it seems like everyone has one, but you might have observed that some of them have stems that are too tall or spread out. Not quite the tidy appearance you presumably desired, is it? What is happening to those succulents with lengthy stems, and what can you do about it?

It is impossible to restore a succulent to its original shape after it has stretched or developed a lengthy stem. But by pruning and repotting the plant to encourage new development, the succulent can be restored to health.

Succulents are popular for indoor containers and houseplant greens because they require little maintenance. But when they start acting in an unexpected way, it can be annoying and ugly. Continue reading to learn how to deal with those succulents with long stems and how to avoid the issue in the future.

What happens if you cut a succulent’s top off?

It’s time to get the shears out and remove the head of any echeverias that are growing tall and out of control. Your succulent won’t appear as stretched out and leggy when you remove the top and transplant it in soil. Grab a good pair of gardening shears or a knife.

The succulent’s stems are naturally long

Check to see if this abrupt growth of a long stem from the center of your succulent is a characteristic of this particular succulent species before you become alarmed.

Many succulent species, including agaves and the string of pearls succulent, have long stems.

The ideal way to showcase these species is in a mixed succulent container where the various heights and sizes will complement one another.

Researching the specific species of succulent you are producing is the best method to ensure that its long stem is a natural occurrence.

The succulent is not getting sufficient light

If your succulent doesn’t come with a naturally long stem, it means there is an issue, and the most likely cause of that problem is a lack of sunshine.

All plants require light in order to photosynthesize, a process that is essential to their survival. Succulents are not adapted to living in low light settings, whereas certain plants are.

Succulents are native to some of the hottest, driest regions of the planet, and they are accustomed to receiving lots of sunlight every day. They may be more negatively impacted by this need being denied than other plant varieties.

A phenomenon known as etiolation occurs when a succulent does not receive enough light, causing it to begin developing stems that are longer than usual.

The process of √©tiolation occurs when a plant directs its remaining resources and energy toward developing an extended stem with smaller or no leaves in the direction of the nearest source of light. This is the plant’s frantic attempt to maintain its life by obtaining just enough light to enable photosynthetic activity, albeit not at the optimal pace.

When this occurs, you must move the plant right away to a more sunny location. Place it close to a window that lets in plenty of light if you live in an apartment. You might need to utilize a grow lamp to provide the succulent with the necessary light if the amount of natural light entering your home is insufficient.

My succulent can I split in half?

Because succulents are such hardy plants, you can actually plant a piece of one and it will develop into a new plant. It may sound like a horror film or the premise of an upcoming science fiction drama on Netflix, but it’s truly possible to regenerate something new from a severed limb. Even if one of its branches is cut off, they will still manage to survive.

Yes, you can prune or cut off a section of a succulent and plant it elsewhere. The clipped succulent piece will adapt to its new home and develop into a full-fledged succulent with the right growing circumstances.

If you want to learn more about pruning succulents, keep reading. It’s like getting numerous plants for the price of one if you get the technique down!

Why has my succulent grown in length?

When they don’t receive enough sunshine, succulents swell out. The succulent will first begin to turn and bend in the direction of the light source.

As it grows, the leaves will spread farther apart, making the plant taller.

The leaves are often smaller and paler in color than usual. The succulent will typically turn green or lose the strength of its original color when it is not exposed to sunshine.

This Echeveria ‘Lola’ is beginning to bend toward the light, and it isn’t quite as colorful as it was when I took the photo for the post about top dressings.

The majority of the time, this will occur when succulents are cultivated indoors, but it can also occur outside when succulents are exposed to too much shadow.

Can succulent cuttings be planted directly in the ground?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.

Can you transplant a succulent stem after cutting it off?

I make a lot of movies and posts about succulents because I have a lot of them in my yard. They are perennial gifts, so to speak. You can simply cut them to acquire more.

Because the vast majority of succulents spread in the same manner, I wanted to write one post that you could refer to whenever I write about a particular succulent. These are the two incredibly simple methods.

Let me demonstrate how to grow succulents:

I usually divide succulents using stem cuttings. Ensure the sharpness and cleanliness of your pruners. Simply trim the stems to the desired length, remove the bottom third of the leaves, and then wait 2 weeks to 4 months before planting them to heal off (the cut end of the stem will callus over).

I either plant them straight in the ground or in a pot with planting mix for succulents and cacti. I use one that is made nearby; it’s also good. Succulents require a loose mixture so that the water can drain completely and prevent rot.

I rarely use individual leaf cuttings to propagate succulents, but it’s still simple. Lay the leaf on top of the mixture after removing it from the stem, making sure to remove the entire leaf all the way to the stem. Off the cut end, there will be a new plantlet.

I suppose I could propagate succulents in my sleep because I do it so frequently! Although many succulents make excellent houseplants, mine all grow outside. If you have just one or two of these bizarre plants, you can easily grow more using these simple methods.

Aloe Vera must be multiplied by division, which involves removing the pups from the mother plant.