What To Do After Succulents Propagate

As it is simpler than using leaves or stem cuttings, the majority of succulent parents prefer to propagate their offspring via offsets. Offsets make for incredibly simple and straightforward propagation, making it ideal for individuals who don’t want to wait for the plant to develop leaves. Succulents like the Haworthia are ideal for this technique.

It is strongly advised to hold off until the offsets are around half the size of the parent plant to make sure they have the nutrients they need to live after being cut off from the parent plant. In order to find the rooted offset from the parent plant, you might want to start by thinking about removing the plant from its container. This is also an opportunity to repot the plant and check the root structure. Then, just twist the offset to remove it from the mother succulent’s roots. If some roots are torn, it won’t matter because the offset will have an opportunity to build its own roots. After removing the offsets successfully, allow them to dry for one to one day. After they have dried out, put them in cactus soil that drains well and water them thoroughly.

Cutting off the offset’s stem or plucking offsets from the parent plant with roots are two ways to propagate from offsets. Therefore, scroll up to read our instructions on how to take a correct cutting if you want to try doing it using stem cuttings. Use only sterilized pruning implements at all times. Place your cuttings in a well-drained potting mix after allowing them to dry completely. Within a few weeks, roots ought to develop.

Maintaining the offsets is really easy. To prevent etiolation or sunburn, you should give them a few hours of morning sunlight or afternoon shade. One piece of advice is to only water them thoroughly when the soil is absolutely dry.

And voilĂ ! That is how you successfully develop your own succulent garden and propagate your succulents. Not too difficult, am I right? To determine the ideal amount of light and water that works for your succulents and encourages new development, we suggest you to experiment with a variety of leaves and stem cuttings. Tell us how your propagation process is going!

Watch this little video to learn how to avoid four mistakes while cultivating succulents.

You may read more about propagating succulents in the following articles:

Once a succulent propagation has roots, what should you do?

Fill a shallow tray with succulent soil (I like to add in some perlite or pumice) and lay the callused leaves on top to propagate your succulent leaves directly in or on soil.

They can also be planted in the ground with the calloused end down. Simply put, this wouldn’t allow you to observe the roots develop.

Water infrequently or not at all until roots begin to grow. The leaves will almost always rot if there is too much water at this time.

I spray a small amount of water just in front of the leaves after placing them on top of the soil. Just enough moisture to make the roots feel comfortable.

When roots or young succulents begin to emerge, spray the leaf cuttings to hydrate the roots. Avoid getting the actual leaves wet. To prevent the roots from drying out, repeat this procedure every few days or so.

Succulent cuttings should be kept in strong light, but until the new plants are more established, direct sun should be avoided.

Transfer them now into their individual pots. Make sure not to overly damage the roots. Keep the young succulents above the dirt and merely cover the roots with soil.

Avoid plucking up the leaves repeatedly to inspect their roots! Although it’s tempting, try to restrain yourself. The young roots can be damaged and stressed out if they are disturbed. The roots will frequently wilt and shrivel up as a result.

After propagation, when can I plant succulents?

Succulents can also grow from solitary leaves. Succulent cultivars with fleshy, plump leaves that are simple to remove function well with this technique. Leaf propagation spares less of the “mother” plant and each leaf can create numerous little plants, even though it will take much longer to produce a full-sized plant. Getting a quality leaf cutting is crucial, much like with stem cuttings. Although they must split from the plant at the base of the stem, leaves can be wiggled off of a plant. Kremblas advises caution, saying, “Be sure to reach all the way down to where the leaf joins the stem, as a broken leaf will not propagate.” And make sure to select a leaf that is firm, plump, and limp-free.

Leaf cuttings should be allowed to callus and need partial sun to grow, just like stem cuttings. Leaf cuttings should be placed on top of a thin layer of succulent potting soil (not buried), and they should be misted with water to keep them wet. The leaf cuttings will start to grow little “pup” plants in about three weeks. The mother leaves will start to wilt and drop off after eight weeks, at which point your pups are ready to be planted.

Can succulent cuttings be planted directly in the ground?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.

How can water from propagating succulents be transferred to the soil?

It is strongly advised to wait until the cutting has at least an inch-long root or the mother leaf has begun to dry up before leaving it to air-dry on a paper towel for approximately a day or two if you wish to transfer or transplant your succulents from water to soil. Remember that water roots are far more delicate than soil roots, so handle them carefully and acclimate them to soil gradually.

When the roots are completely dry, gently bury your succulent in unfertilized cactus soil and place it in a spot with only bright, indirect light. Giving your succulents direct sunlight at this time is not advised because they are still delicate. &nbsp

From this point on, it is advised to water your succulent on a regular basis. Every two weeks, a thorough soak would do.

Watch this video to learn about succulent water propagation:

See some of the most frequently asked questions about propagating succulents and cacti in this little video.

How should a propagated plant be planted?

The simplest method for growing plants with stems at the base.

  • Plant should be taken out of container.
  • Use a knife or your fingers to cut the plant into smaller pieces.
  • Verify the roots of each division.
  • In appropriate containers, replant.

How frequently should I water cuttings of succulents?

Succulents may be multiplied, giving you more of what you love. In order to share succulents with friends or because your plants have grown lanky and unsightly, you may need to propagate succulents. Whatever your motivations, we have a tried-and-true method for propagating succulents successfully.

Easy Steps for Propagating a Succulent by Leaf Cutting

1. Cut the desired number of leaves off the stem of the succulent you want to multiply.

  • Where the leaf meets the succulent stem, make a precise snap. Your propagation will go more quickly and easily as a result.
  • For propagation, take many leaf cuttings (see #5).

2. Allow the succulent leaf’s broken end to callus over, mend, and/or dry out.

  • While a week is a fantastic amount of time, you can get away with 2-3 days for small succulent leaves and 4-5 days for larger succulent leaves while you wait for the leaves to heal.
  • The succulent leaves you want to multiply should be placed on a sunny window sill to dry. The sun’s rays expose the leaves, strengthening them with nutrients as well.
  • When natural sunshine is unavailable, LED grow lights are a choice.

3. Place a succulent leaf directly on the soil in a container or on a tray of soil.

  • You should touch the earth with the healed portion of the leaf you are propagating, but not bury it deeply. From there, the newly propagated succulent will grow, and in order to survive, it requires light and space to breathe.
  • Although it would take a lot longer to spread, you could let the leaf develop without soil.

4. Provide water and light to your succulent leaf cuttings for successful propagation.

  • Depending on the temperature and humidity in your home, water succulent leaf cuttings anywhere between two and four times per week. But don’t overwater. While keeping the soil from drying out, soil should be moist but not to the point of having any standing water.
  • It’s ideal to have direct, bright light. Your leaf cuttings may become scorched by too much direct sunlight.

5. Produce several leaves.

  • You’ll probably experience some casualties when propagating succulents. You have a better chance of successfully growing succulents if you follow the procedures of propagation with numerous leaf cuttings.
  • Place a number of leaf cuttings on a tray or large pot filled with potting soil that is lightweight. Here, you can immediately see which leaf cuttings will begin to develop roots and young succulents and are good candidates for propagation and which leaves will begin to shrivel and turn black, making them unsuitable.

6. Be patient and give your leaf cuttings enough time to grow roots, produce offspring, and reproduce.

  • Please take note that leaf cuttings that produce babies but no roots are preferable to leaf cuttings that produce babies but no roots.
  • You can sigh with relief when you notice that the young succulents or pups are growing. When the pups or babies appear, you can tell that they are able to produce their own food through photosynthesis as well as their own leaf systems. A leaf cutting that only grows roots may never give birth to offspring or may take a very long time to do so.
  • You can always pinch or clip off the mother plant leaf once the babies/pups have formed.

7. Plant your just multiplied succulents in pots.

  • Allow your babies or puppies to establish strong roots so that you can repot them into any container you want. If you propagated them in your chosen pot, let them there to continue growing.
  • While propagated succulents are still in their adolescent years, keep providing them with indirect strong light. Direct sunlight will be too harsh.
  • Give your new succulents a nice soak once every two weeks to water them. Don’t overwater once more. Just keep in mind that succulents store water in their leaves and stems, and that too much water around their roots will result in death by root rot.
  • Remove the leaf from the mother plant that was used to propagate the plant, if you haven’t done so before. It has probably already started to shrivel up. The mother leaf remnants will ultimately dry out and fall off if you cut it close to the new plant.

*Special remark Some succulents, such as hoya and kalanchoe, cannot be propagated via leaf cuttings but can instead be done using alternative techniques, such as stem cutting. Later, we’ll talk about those.

Folks, that’s all she wrote! Your succulents that you propagated should be well on their way to developing into mature plants. Good fortune!

Succulents can survive in water for how long?

Succulents can be grown in water, but there are benefits and drawbacks. Before determining whether or not to give it a try, you must be informed of them.

They Grow Faster

Succulents have a rapid rate of growth. While a new plant can be developed in water within days, it can take weeks or months for soil-grown plants to begin developing roots.

Growing succulents in water is the best option if you’re impatient and want a healthy plant right away.

They Can’t Dry Out

If a succulent plant in soil doesn’t get enough water when it needs it, it could perish. In response, a succulent cultivated in water will modify its growth patterns.

There Is No Risk of Overwatering

Succulent plants require only infrequent irrigation and love dry conditions, making them a low-maintenance option (which helps prevent rot).

However, another advantage of growing them in water is that it eliminates the possibility of overwatering, which is a common error made while caring for these plants by inexperienced gardeners.

Water Propagation Is Faster

Before you can harvest or prune a succulent grown in dirt without risking destroying the plant’s roots, it may take two to three years.

They Will Need Less Care and Attention

Succulents will require less care and attention if you grow them in water as opposed to soil, which is one of the main benefits.

This can be a wonderful option if you don’t have a green thumb if you want plants but don’t want to put in a lot of work.

They Don’t Last Long in Water

The lifespan of succulent plants is decreased when they are buried underwater. It’s best not to submerge them for more than six months or so before you reevaluate.

They Are Prone to Root Rot

They are vulnerable to root rot because their soil lacks helpful microorganisms that can convert nutrients into forms that plants can use.

This indicates that if your succulents are growing in water, they may require periodic repotting as well as fertilizer additions over the course of their lifespan.

Not Recommended for Outdoors

You can employ these methods if your objective is to cultivate succulents indoors solely for decorative purposes (and not outside).

But it would be preferable to employ more conventional techniques if your goal was to grow succulents outside. It is best to put them in drainage-friendly containers with cactus-potting mix.

Can Lead To Stunted Growth

These varieties of succulents may suffer more than those cultivated immersed or rooted in soil because growing them in water does not supply enough oxygen.

They Don’t Have Enough Nutrients

Because they lack soil to assist them collect nutrients, succulents that grow in water do not absorb as many of those nutrients.

Adding fertilizer before planting and then every few weeks after that, depending on how quickly your plant grows, is the best approach to ensure enough nutrients are there.

Your plant may need some time to adapt as well. Regularly check for signs of stress, such as drooping leaves or wilting stems, and adjust as necessary.