What Temperature Do Succulents Need

Succulents and cacti prefer to reside in the “sweet spot” of temperature, just as is the case with sunlight exposure. These hardy plants can suffer irreparable harm from either extreme of the temperature range, so it’s important to monitor their health and adjust the environment as necessary.

Succulents and cacti thrive most effectively in temperatures between 40 and 80 °F. Outside of this range, little temperature swings are tolerated, but swings of five or more can result in permanent harm. Even more intriguing is the fact that temperatures that are on the edge of the bearable range (about 40°F or 80°F) can operate as “stressors,” positively affecting the plant and encouraging the expression of more vivid hues.

Succulents and cacti should ideally be kept above freezing during the winter to prevent frost damage. While more tropical types like euphorbia and lithops demand minimum temperatures of 50 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit, other cultivars are actually frost hardy and prefer cooler overnight temperatures of 30 to 40 degrees. Searching for “ideal temperature for insert plant name here” on Google is currently the quickest approach to find out what temps are optimal for your plants. Each plant product page will eventually feature our own documentation.

Extreme Cold and Extreme Hot

Succulents and cactus can, you guessed it, freeze when exposed to freezing or below-zero weather! The water that has frozen inside the plant’s cells expands as it thaws, killing the cells by rupturing them. When the plant finally thaws out, the damaged regions will start to decay or scar permanently—a symptom that could take a few days to manifest. To stop the rot from spreading, the best course of action in this circumstance is to remove the afflicted region with a clean razor blade.

It is preferable to relocate your collection under a patio cover or inside of your home while the freezing conditions last in order to prevent damage from frost and freezing temperatures temporarily. A “frost blanket,” which is just a thin piece of fabric designed to protect plants from cold, can also be used to cover your plants. Plants should be taken indoors for the winter or placed in a sunroom or greenhouse with plenty of natural light in regions of the country where cold temperatures last for months at a time (essentially everywhere else save California).

However, heated temperatures can also do harm if they are not controlled, so they are not the only bad guys in this tale. A variety of things can happen to your plants when it becomes too hot (90 degrees Fahrenheit and above), especially when combined with full sun exposure. For example, leaves may shrivel and/or burn, water inside plant cells may steam and explode, and root systems may become fried.

Because soil is not a very good conductor of heat or cold, succulents planted in the ground with developed root systems can withstand high heat and cold more better than those planted in containers. On the other hand, containers easily conduct heat and cold, focusing such extremes on the roots of the plants.

There are always exceptions to the norm, just like there are in everything else in life. Succulents can withstand temperatures well below freezing and temps as high as 100 degrees. Drive about and observe what sorts of succulents your neighbors are successfully cultivating to find out what varieties work best in your specific climate.

Moisture and Extreme Temperatures = Bad News

Extreme heat and dampness are among the most troublesome environmental conditions. You should never put your plants in a situation where they are both hot and damp or cold and wet. Whether in the ground or in containers, plants that are grown in dry soil perform far better than those that are not. The water in the soil might start to steam in exceptionally hot weather, thus “cooking” your plants. Water can obviously freeze in freezing or subfreezing temperatures, harming the root system and producing rot. If you absolutely must water your plants when extremely high temperatures are predicted, try to do so as early as possible, ideally before 7 a.m.

The TLDR (too long, didn’t read) Summary

Average temperatures are much preferable to harsh ones for succulents. Frost damage can occur in cold conditions, whereas scorching and atrophy can occur in hot temperatures. Paying attention to what your plants are saying is the simplest method to make sure they are content. Bring them indoors or wrap them in a frost blanket if they are suffering from frost damage. Move them to a sheltered spot or cover them with shade cloth if they are scorching or wilting.

How cold should it be for succulents?

Whether a succulent is a soft or hard succulent determines what temperature it can withstand.

Anything warmer than 32 degrees F will be enjoyable for soft succulents. preferably over 40 degrees.

These plants cannot endure colder than freezing temperatures. Their hefty, thick leaves, which serve as water reservoirs, will freeze and destroy the plant.

Succulents that can withstand the cold can sustain -20 F. The best it can manage is a zone 4 to 5, and let me tell you, that is very impressive.

You must keep in mind that even if they can withstand temperatures below zero, they still like dry soil. That remains constant.

The majority of winters in the contiguous US will not only be dry but also wet and snowy.

What temperature should be used while bringing succulents inside?

The ideal temperature range for succulents is between 50 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Succulents, on the other hand, can survive temperatures as low as 40F and as high as 90F.

Succulents grow stressed and may experience shock when exposed to temperatures that are outside of their comfort zone.

It’s crucial to bring your succulents inside when it gets cold or when it gets really hot outside.

Succulents can be harmed by low temperatures. Your succulent will probably perish when the temperature drops below freezing.

When a plant is exposed to high temperatures for an extended period of time, the leaves may suffer irreparable damage and eventually wilt or turn discolored.

Succulents are excellent inside plants during the winter months when there is less light, but they must be moved outside once summer returns.

Do succulents need to be in the sun directly?

1. Ensure that your succulents receive adequate light. Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

Do succulents survive the cold outside?

There are many succulents that can endure the winter outside, even in extremely cold locations. These

Succulents that are hardy thrive in chilly, snowy winters. Sempervivum heuffelii, which maintains vivid colors for Winter Interest, is one of our favorites. The frost-hardy Sedum cultivars are especially recommended since they create excellent ground covers in practically all regions.

I have succulents, when can I put them outside?

Before anything else, when is it too early to plant new succulents outside?

In general, waiting until after the last frost and when the nights don’t get below 40F is advised. Even while you could grow certain succulents outside before then, planting is most successful in warmer climates.

However, avoid waiting until the summer because the heat can be just as problematic as the cold. When planting your succulents outside, look for temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

What are some succulent garden planting tips?

Just like in any garden, you must select plants that speak to you. What kinds of plants you want depends on whether the garden will be indoors or outdoors. That advice also holds true if you’ve made the decision to develop a succulent garden. Pick the ones that seem good to you and that you enjoy.

Watching how frequently you water the plants is the other piece of advice. Keep in mind that succulents don’t require a lot of water because of their nature. Throw away any extra water that collects after you water your succulents in saucers if you are keeping them inside. If you selected an air plant variety, simply spray the plants.

In addition, make sure you read the instructions that come with the plants and consult with a plant or gardening expert if you have any doubts about how to take care of any particular plants you intend to add to your garden.

How do you take care of succulents? Do succulents need pruning?

One of the low-maintenance plants you will come across is possibly a succulent. That depends on the variety you have selected, of course. Succulents, on the other hand, grow slowly by nature, and the vast majority of species do not vine like other plants. They don’t typically require pruning, which is why they are so well-liked for indoor plants. They require hardly any pruning and very little moisture.

Read the instructions that often accompany with the plants you purchase for maintenance. Do not overwater them or allow the water sit on the plants.

Contact Ambius if you manage a commercial property and need succulents that will be well-maintained.

How do you water a succulent? Is there anything special to know?

The best approach to water a succulent is to take it out of its saucer and water it with lukewarm tap water, just like you would other plants. Replace it in the saucer you are using underneath the pot after letting the water entirely drain through it. Later, check to see if any extra water has collected beneath the plant and discard that.

Never forget that succulents cannot endure prolonged wet, muddy soils. See if the soil seems very dry by inspecting it. Check the watering guidelines included with the plant you purchase as well.

When should someone plant succulents?

There is no planting season because the majority of people utilize succulents inside. Any time of year is suitable for setting up an indoor succulent garden. The greatest times to plant succulents outside, though, might be in the spring or summer.

Succulents need to be planted when the soil can be handled, even though they are hardy and can even survive the winter rather well.

If planted during the warmer months, they will probably fare considerably better.

In what soil should a succulent be planted?

Succulents are typically already planted when you go to buy them. It will probably be soil. Succulents are fantastic since they require little care. Succulents shouldn’t typically be taken out of the container they were shipped in, nor should the soil be changed.

Of course, succulents tend to prefer coarse, rockier, sandier, well-drained soil if you are building any type of indoor succulent garden and have to take them from the pots and the soil that they arrived in.

Succulents actually thrive on inorganic soils like silt, clay, or sand. They don’t require a lot of soil because they have rather shallow root systems. Finally, despite the fact that many succulents are sold in tiny pots or containers, there is no need for concern. Succulents thrive in small pots and containers due to their nature.

Where should I plant succulents?

Succulents should be planted in an area that receives plenty of sunlight if you live in an arid region where they will flourish. Remember to ask your garden center’s professionals about planting requirements if you have any questions.

Should succulents only be planted indoors or are there outdoor succulents?

There are many different kinds of succulents, and some of them thrive both indoors and outdoors. Where you reside and the climate there can have a big impact. Keep in mind that succulents prefer dry, hot, and arid locations; they do not require a lot of moisture and probably won’t flourish as well there.

The brevity of the response is, however, both. They can be cultivated both inside and outside.

How frequently should a succulent be watered?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

Is it possible to hydrate succulents with ice cubes?

One of the most enjoyable pastimes you can engage in is caring for plants. They will not only give you many advantages, but they are also aesthetically beautiful. Simply ensure that you are aware of how to care for them.

Be mindful of the risks if you decide to attempt watering succulents with ice cubes. It’s conceivable that your plants will be harmed or killed if you subject them to such jarring temperature variations.

Any plant won’t like having its watered with ice cubes, succulent or not. To avoid stressing them out, it is preferable to use room temperature water. Additionally, you should plant plants in containers that encourage proper water drainage as well as good air circulation.

Where should indoor succulents be kept?

Succulents thrive in hot, arid conditions and don’t mind a little neglect due to their unique capacity to store water. They are therefore ideally suited to growing indoors and are the perfect choice for anyone looking for low-maintenance houseplants. Follow these instructions for successful plant care if you’re choosing succulents for the first time.

Select a succulent that will thrive in your indoor environment.

The majority of succulents need direct sunshine, however if your home only has a shady area, choose low light-tolerant plants like mother-in-tongue. law’s A trailing variety, like string of bananas, is an excellent option if you intend to grow your succulent in a hanging planter. To learn about your succulents’ requirements for sunlight, size, and spread, always read the plant labels.

Give the plants a good draining potting material.

You should repot your succulent as soon as you get it home since nurseries always plant their succulents in soil that is overly rich and holds too much moisture. A coarse potting mix with sufficient drainage and aeration is a good place to start. You can use an African violet mix or unique cactus and succulent mixtures that you can purchase at the nursery. Add perlite or pumice to the cactus or African violet mix (up to 50% of the total potting mix, depending on your particular succulent’s moisture requirements) to further increase drainage and prevent compaction. To make sure the mixture is moist throughout, always moisten it before using.

Decide on a container.

When repotting, use a container that is at least 1 to 2 inches bigger than the nursery container and has a drainage hole. Avoid using glass containers (such mason jars or terrariums) for long-term potting since they prevent roots from breathing and over time may result in root rot. Place your plant inside the container and backfill with extra pre-moistened potting mix after filling the bottom one-third of the container with pre-moistened potting mix.

Put the succulent plant in a pot somewhere sunny.

Try to arrange your succulents close to a south or east-facing window because most succulents need at least six hours of sun each day. Insufficient sunlight may cause your succulents to become spindly or to extend toward the light.

Between waterings, allow the potting mix to dry out.

Overwatering succulents is the most common error people make with them. Watering more deeply but less frequently is preferable. Before the next watering, completely saturate the potting mix (while making sure the water drains out of the drainage hole properly). The plant can finally perish if the potting soil is left moist every day.

Succulents should be fertilized at least once a year.

Fertilizer works best for plants in the spring (when the days lengthen and new growth starts) and again in the late summer. Use a water-soluble, balanced fertilizer (such as 8-8-8 or 10-10-10) that has been diluted to half the strength indicated on the container. Since succulents are semi-dormant in the winter, there is no need to nourish them. Because they are not actively growing, they do not require the nutrient boost.