What Succulents Look Good Together

There are so many different kinds of succulents. A general rule of thumb is to select succulents with comparable requirements if you want to arrange them. They will coexist peacefully and preserve the ensemble’s aesthetic for a very long time.

For instance, Graptosedum California Sunset grows best in the summer, whilst Crassula (Jades) prefers the winter. So planting them together wouldn’t be a good idea. You should take into account the growing season, hydration requirements, lighting requirements, and soil requirements while choosing succulent combos.

Agave, Echeveria, and Sempervivum are several succulents that go dormant in the winter and look fantastic together. Aeonium, Aloe, Graptopetalum, and Kalanchoe may come to mind if you want to group the summer-dormant succulents.

Height

In addition to the succulents’ characteristics, height and color must also be taken into account in order to arrange them harmoniously. You should have a thriller, filler, and spiller in your layout.

Use tall succulents to provide height to the thriller and enhance the overall design. As filler around them, use shorter succulents. To finish the arrangement, add a few “spiller trailing succulents.” The recipe is straightforward, and you can always add your own spin to make it appear appealing to you.

Color

Choosing a theme for your succulent arrangement is simple. There are a variety of succulents that may make your succulent arrangements appear fantastic, whether you want them to be colorful or monochromatic.

Monochromatic, similar, and complementary color combinations are the three most common types.

You must group succulents with the same colors but various shades together for a monochromatic arrangement.

When using similar settings, you will group colors that are adjacent to one another on the color wheel (orange, yellow, and green).

Contrasting colors on the color wheel are required for complementary color schemes (red and green).

Can you combine any succulents?

Succulents are ideal plants for beautiful plant arrangements due to the variety of their look. There are so many incredible succulents to pick from, and they come in a variety of forms, sizes, colors, and textures. Which succulents can you grow together, though? Continue reading to discover how to create stunning succulent arrangements by combining various succulents.

How to Combine Succulents

Although almost every species of succulent can be combined with another, there are still a few things to keep in mind when creating succulent arrangements.

When planting succulents together, the most crucial factors are the care requirements and development duration. Succulents will work together very well if they all have the same maintenance needs and grow in the same season.

For visually beautiful succulent arrangements, other factors including color, shape, and texture are essential. These requirements, which are equally crucial, determine which varieties of succulents will be combined.

Care Requirements

Succulents are often low-maintenance plants. All of them can retain water in their components (leaves, stems, or roots), and the majority of them can withstand droughts very well.

But some succulents require more moisture than others. While some people like full light, others benefit from partial shade. Succulents can go dormant in the summer or the winter. Tender succulents are less tolerant of the harsh conditions, while hardy succulents can withstand frost and freezing temperatures.

You should think about the following when grouping succulent plants:

  • criteria for water
  • criteria for light
  • temperature
  • growth period (or dormancy period)

For instance, succulents with thinner leaves typically require more water than succulents with thicker foliage. You run the risk of losing one of those succulents if you plant them together and water them equally. If you decide to plant them together, attempt to offer succulents that thrive in water a “direct dose” of water while keeping other succulents dry in some other way.

Planting varieties of succulents that are dormant during the same time is crucial when making succulent arrangements.

Some of the summer-dormant succulents include Graptopetalum, Aeonium, Aloe, Crassula, Gasteria, Graptoveria, Pachyphytum, and Haworthia.

Succulents that hibernate in the winter include Echeveria, Sempervivum, Agave, Adenium, Euphorbia, and Lithops. Planting succulents from the same category together will produce the greatest results because different succulents become dormant at different times of the year.

Color

The color of succulents is one of its greatest qualities. Except for deep blue, they appear in practically any color. Additionally, a lot of them have the capacity to alter their hue in response to the surrounding surroundings (hot temperature, sunlight exposure, etc.). They are even more beautiful due to this quality!

Even while each succulent is lovely on its own, by grouping them according to color, you may make stunning arrangements. Basic color theory is the finest formula for making a succulent arrangement that works.

Succulents in complementing colors can be used (the opposite colors on the color wheel, such as green and red, blue and orange, and purple and yellow). Since many succulents naturally contain reds and greens, making this type of arrangement is not too difficult.

A monochromatic color scheme necessitates succulents of the same color but in various tones and hues. For instance, different shades of green succulents allow you to create arrangements with greater texture by using several succulent species. A monochrome arrangement with a single accent of a different hue is a fantastic choice.

In succulent arrangements, an analogous color scheme—three hues that are adjacent to one another on the color wheel—is frequently employed. An equivalent color scheme that gives you several possibilities for choosing succulents is yellow, yellow-green, and green.

By the warmth of their color, succulents can be interestingly combined. For a cold-toned arrangement, match blue-green succulents with purple ones; for a warm-toned one, pair yellow, orange, red, and yellow-green succulents.

Succulents that are variegated or have some form of marking add added interest and are acceptable in succulent bouquets.

Shape and Texture

Utilizing a variety of plants with various heights, forms, textures, and unique characteristics results in a fascinating variance in succulent arrangements (like hairs). The alternatives are practically limitless: you can select from tall, upward-growing plants like Sansevieria or Aeonium, rosette-forming plants like Sempervivum or Echeveria, cascading (trailing) plants like several varieties of Sedum and Senecio.

For a more intriguing pattern, experiment with succulents of different heights. Alternately, you could use succulents of the same height to create a uniform pattern while experimenting with different colors and textures.

A few succulents have wonderful texture. For instance, the white markings on Gasteria, Aloe, and Haworthia provide a beautiful texture. Any variety of cacti, with their distinctive stems and spines, give fantastic texture. The genus Euphorbia features a variety of growth patterns and textures.

Succulents are well-known for their plump leaves and unique stalks, but some of them also produce beautiful blooms. A flowering succulent added to the arrangement will produce a stunning display while it is in bloom.

Pots and ContainersAn Important Part in Succulent Arrangements

Pots and containers are the last but not least! As enjoyable as arranging succulents can be picking the ideal container and experimenting with its size, shape, color, and texture.

When selecting a pot for a succulent arrangement, seek for a pot with hues, textures, and shapes that either match or contrast interestingly with the succulents in the arrangement. Making a sensible choice when selecting a container is important, as are different top dressings like pebbles or crushed stone.

Can I plant as many succulents together as possible?

I suggest investing in a pot or planter that you can stand to look at every day if you’re growing succulents indoors! After all, indoor plants play a significant role in the dcor of your house.

Personally, I absolutely adore keeping my succulents and indoor plants in pots that are either ivory-creme or crisp white, like the ones in this post. I believe it highlights the succulents while blending in nicely with our furnishings and other elements.

Always keep in mind how crucial it is for the root system of your succulents to choose a pot with a drainage hole. Succulents may last for days, even weeks or months without water because they store water in their leaves and stems. They are resistant to drought because they can store water in this way.

In order to prevent the roots of your succulents from sitting in moist soil, a drainage hole allows excess water to flow from the pot.

Actually, one of the main causes of dying succulents is too much moisture. Succulents’ roots will eventually decay if they are left to sit in wet soil, which will result in a dead plant. Simply put, succulents don’t require that much water.

Planting succulents in a container with a drainage hole will benefit them. They’ll repay you by developing into thriving, healthy plants!

A excellent place to start is with a decent cactus mix or soil blend designed specifically for succulents. Succulents require good drainage and air circulation to thrive, and this soil will offer both.

It’s time to fill your container with your succulent or cactus mix once you have it on hand. (If you want to prevent soil from leaking out, you can cover the drainage hole with some mesh.)

Fill the pot with enough dirt to allow your succulents to protrude above the rim. Simply add extra dirt to raise it if the leaves touch below the rim.

TIP:I almost never remove soil from a succulent’s roots before planting it. This isn’t required in my opinion. I just remove the plant from its plastic container and place it, soil and everything, in its new pot.

I’ve been doing it this way for years and don’t see any reason to alter. I’m aware that many gardeners remove the roots from their existing soil, but I find that my plants do better when I don’t. Only when I’m doing crafts with live succulents do I do it.

One of the most fascinating aspects of gardening is that everyone develops their own preferred method of doing things, even if there are undoubtedly some rules you should abide by. If it functions for you, that’s fantastic! Continue your wonderful work. To each their own, as the saying goes.

Simply plant each succulent near apart if you want to create the appearance of densely packed succulents. As long as the base of the plant is sitting over the lip of the pot, as seen in the photo, tuck in each plant wherever it looks good. (The image is from my Instagram page, where I share pictures of succulent arrangements and gardening advice.)

Consider this process as being artistic. It takes art to make lovely succulent or flower arrangements! It’s best to mix and match your succulents while paying attention to color, texture, and height if you want to create a pleasing arrangement.

Succulents don’t seem to mind growing so closely together, so I never worry about that. Additionally, they remain compact when grown in this manner, which I appreciate. They can continue to grow in this manner in the same pot for up to a year before you need to consider relocating them once they outgrow it.

Particularly for my indoor plants, I particularly prefer smaller succulents than ones that appear overgrown. You have a choice: you can plant one, two, or a lot of succulents in a pot. I have engaged in each one and have enjoyed it equally.

Before planting, try arranging your succulents above the ground to see if you like how they appear together. After that, you can start planting or moving things around.

Simply dig a hole in the ground for each plant and surround its root systems with soil to plant it.

How to Water Succulents After Planting

Don’t water your succulents right away after repotting them, despite what you might assume. Before giving them their first drink of water, I advise waiting about a week.

Any roots that were harmed during the transplant or who previously had damage could get infected or rotten if you water them after planting. It will take a few days for those roots to callus over or heal, preventing them from absorbing water that would cause them to decay.

Use a tiny watering can to hydrate your succulents if you only repotted one or two of them. However, if you planted them the same way I did in the image above, you’ll benefit more from using a watering squeeze bottle because it will allow you to apply water more precisely.

To make sure the succulents in the container receive adequate water, you should water them regularly using a watering syringe or a watering squeeze bottle, as seen in the image below.

TIP: If this is your first time growing succulents, you should know that you need ONLY water the soil, NOT the actual leaves.

The soil requires moisture, not the leaves, because the roots will absorb the water and transfer it to the leaves, where it will be stored.

It’s acceptable to get the leaves wet if you’re growing succulents outdoors and have them planted directly in the ground because the sun will soon evaporate the water. You don’t need to be concerned about your leaves rotting from too much water exposure.

Can I plant Jade alongside other succulents?

Pairing succulents together will impair their growth and longevity if their needs for light, water, temperature, and soil are not comparable. Jade plants, for instance, grow best in the winter, whilst California Sunsets do best in the summer. So it wouldn’t be a good idea to pair them.

Is it preferable to grow succulents alone or in groups?

Recently, I’ve received several inquiries from folks wondering how much room should exist between the succulents in their arrangement. The reply is, “It depends.” Succulents are perfectly capable of being planted quite near to one another.

Succulents grow more slowly when planted closely together, helping the arrangement to better maintain its original layout. When they are close together, watering them can be more difficult. But this is a really fantastic approach to plant your succulents, particularly if you’re creating the arrangement as a present or for an event.

A nice illustration of succulents that are firmly packed together is this clam shell planter at Waterwise Botanicals.

Succulents are generally slow growers, but if you give them a bit extra room to spread out, they’ll grow a little faster and eventually fill the space. If you want your plants to grow larger or reproduce more readily on their own, this is a fantastic alternative. I suggest using this slightly dispersed strategy if you are just getting started with succulents.

It is simpler to water the succulents correctly when there is room between the plants. The soil will dry up more quickly due to the improved air flow. We are aware that succulents thrive in rapidly draining soil!

Remember that you don’t want the succulents to be too close together or in a pot that is much bigger than they are.

Succulents will prioritize generating roots over growing larger if they are given too much room. A good distance between plants, in my opinion, is between 1/2 and 1.