What Kind Of Succulent Should I Get

If you’ve ever experienced a severe sunburn, the aloe plant is undoubtedly well known to you.

One of the most well-liked succulents for beginners, this plant’s sap not only cures sunburn but is also incredibly simple to grow!

Aloe can be grown in a plethora of diverse forms, including those with zebra stripes, speckles, dots, a crown of pointed leaves, and more. Any selection you make will make your windowsill look good.

Aloe succulents need only a nice windowsill, a container with sufficient drainage, and watering anytime the soil becomes dry for them to thrive. Whether you take good care of them or have a propensity for neglect, these tiny fellows are not choosy and will prosper and look gorgeous.

Which succulents ought I purchase?

You can be the type to give your plants excessive care or to completely disregard them. Maybe you’re indecisive like me, sometimes showing your plants a lot of attention and other times abandoning them completely.

You should choose different plants based on how you care for succulents and where you reside. For indoor growers, Haworthia fasciata is a fantastic choice. However, certain Echeveria species like to grow in direct sunshine outside.

The Portulacaria afra plant is a fantastic choice if you frequently water your plants. Try a succulent or cactus with very thick leaves if you frequently forget to water your plants.

Succulents come in a wide range of sizes, and with that diversity comes a range of pricing. You’ll also find that some sizes require less maintenance than others.

Bigger plants are more stable. They require less watering because they don’t dry out as rapidly. In general, it will be simpler to care for your plant in a larger container. A succulent in a gallon-sized container requires less care than one in a 6 inch container, which requires less care than a 4 inch container, and so on.

Although a succulent in a larger pot will cost more, I think it’s worth it if it means you’re less likely to destroy it.

Cuttings (succulents without roots) and plugs are two substitutes for succulents in pots (like cuttings but with roots and a little soil).

Cuttings are far less expensive and easy to work with because you don’t have to bother about roots! They tend to be slightly more dependent than a plant with deep roots, but not excessively so.

Plugs fall midway between a succulent in two pots and cuttings. Although they begin to grow more quickly than cuttings, they can still be quite fickle.

You might be thinking, “That’s wonderful! I’ve located the perfect plant for me, and I know what size to acquire. I know what I should buy, but where can I find them?

Both locally at different shops or nurseries and online are options for purchasing. There are advantages to both.

Are succulents suitable for novice gardeners?

No matter how green their thumb may be, succulents are a remarkably diverse group of plants that have enduring appeal for all gardeners. Even the most ardent grower and collector can remain engaged in succulent collecting because there are practically endless types. Additionally, because of their low maintenance requirements and capacity for reproduction, they are forgiving of novice gardeners still getting the swing of things and are simple to care for.

How can I determine which succulents I require?

There is a ton of information on the internet regarding watering succulents, specifically about overwatering them. You already know that overwatering is one of the seven deadly sins of succulents and will almost certainly result in your succulent being less than perfect. However, succulents do require watering, so how can you tell when it is necessary to water them or if you are just going to let them wither away in a pool of water?

A succulent with enough watering would have thick, sturdy leaves. There should not be much give when you squeeze them between your fingers. They probably require watering if they are soft. Wrinkled leaves are another telltale clue; when plants are thirsty, they pucker and wrinkle their leaves.

“Only water when the earth is fully dry,” is a common phrase. This is true, but sometimes it can be challenging to detect when the soil is dry if your plant occupies most of the pot or if you have a topdressing. Keep in mind that you want to ensure that the soil is dry throughout the entire pot, not just on the top.

Picking up the pot is my tried-and-true, highly scientific method of determining whether my plants require water. Learn about your plants; eventually, you’ll be able to discern if the soil is dry or not by the weight of the pot. It goes without saying that a pot with dry soil will weigh far less than a container with moist dirt. Therefore, pick up your pots after watering them and feel their weight. Then, pick them up once they are dry and feel their weight once more. After some practice, it will come naturally to you to know when your plant needs to be watered.

Another simple approach is to poke a wooden skewer into the ground; if it emerges clean and dry, your soil is probably dry and your succulent needs watering. Your succulent will be alright for the time being even if it comes out dusty and moist.

Water meters are available in garden centers and on Amazon if you wish to use a real scientific method. These ought to make it clear to you if your plant requires watering or not.

Always keep in mind that succulents require a full soak; water them until the drainage pores are completely filled. Not even a spritz will do.

You now know how to determine whether your succulent needs watering. Do you have a favorite way to determine whether your plants need water? If you do, please tell me about it! You can leave a comment below, or you can find me uploading photos of my plants on several social media platforms; the links are on the sidebar.

Growing Tips

  • Allow the top 2 inches of soil to dry out in between waterings so that the plant can grow.
  • During the winter, keep the plant on its dry side. Be extremely cautious when it is in the bud stage because even the tiniest overwatering or dehydration can cause the buds to fall off.

What succulent is the simplest to maintain?

A stylish decorative addition to any home are succulents. For your indoor environment, this wide range of plants offers countless color combinations and low maintenance possibilities. Succulents are able to hold water for longer periods of time than most plants, which require a moist climate to survive. Because of this characteristic, succulents may thrive well in the hot, dry environments of the ordinary home.

Beginner-friendly plants are succulents. Succulents have an alluring charm and come in a range of forms, dimensions, and textures. Here are six succulents that may be grown year-round inside with ease.

Jade Tree. The jade plant, which is indigenous to South Africa, features robust stems and glossy green leaves. Water jade when the soil gets dry and keep it in direct sunlight. Jade is frequently harmed by overwatering, so exercise caution.

Liquid aloe. Since ancient times, this prickly herb has been utilized medicinally. The inner leaves’ sap is used to treat burns and treat wounds. Aloe Vera needs to be kept in direct sunshine and irrigated if the leaves feel parched or fragile. To enjoy the beauty of this medicinal plant every day, keep it beside a well-lit kitchen window.

Echeveria. This native to the desert comes in a range of colors and thrives in dry environments. Once the echeveria has dried out, it should only be watered. This succulent grows best in unglazed clay pots because the clay enables water to evaporate. Echeveria should be grown in full sun with well-drained soil for best results.

The Zebra Plant. The horizontal stripes that adorn the leaves of this eye-catching succulent give it its name. The zebra plant, which is neat, contained, and ideal for any little place, is around 5 tall and 6 wide. A modest amount of sunshine and water are needed for zebra plants.

Panda Tree. This plant has tiny white hairs that give it a fuzzy appearance. Panda plants, native to Madagascar, enjoy the dry winter air inside of heated dwellings. Just enough water, as needed, to prevent the leaves from shriveling

King of Thorns With the help of this lovely plant, add some color to your space. It can bloom all year long if exposed to enough sunlight, producing bracts that are red or yellow and enclosing the tiny flowers. Crown of Thorns prefers low to moderate watering requirements and should be grown in full sun.

Where do I place succulents inside?

Succulents thrive in hot, arid conditions and don’t mind a little neglect due to their unique capacity to store water. They are therefore ideally suited to growing indoors and are the perfect choice for anyone looking for low-maintenance houseplants. Follow these instructions for successful plant care if you’re choosing succulents for the first time.

Select a succulent that will thrive in your indoor environment.

The majority of succulents need direct sunshine, however if your home only has a shady area, choose low light-tolerant plants like mother-in-tongue. law’s A trailing variety, like string of bananas, is an excellent option if you intend to grow your succulent in a hanging planter. Always read the plant labels to determine the sunlight needs, size, and spread of your succulents.

Give the plants a good draining potting material.

You should repot your succulent as soon as you get it home since nurseries always plant their succulents in soil that is overly rich and holds too much moisture. A coarse potting mix with sufficient drainage and aeration is a good place to start. You can use an African violet mix or unique cactus and succulent mixtures that you can purchase at the nursery. Add perlite or pumice to the cactus or African violet mix (up to 50% of the total potting mix, depending on your particular succulent’s moisture requirements) to further increase drainage and prevent compaction. To make sure the mixture is moist throughout, always moisten it before using.

Decide on a container.

When repotting, use a container that is at least 1 to 2 inches bigger than the nursery container and has a drainage hole. Avoid using glass containers (such mason jars or terrariums) for long-term potting since they prevent roots from breathing and over time may result in root rot. Place your plant inside the container and backfill with extra pre-moistened potting mix after filling the bottom one-third of the container with pre-moistened potting mix.

Put the succulent plant in a pot somewhere sunny.

Try to arrange your succulents close to a south or east-facing window because most succulents need at least six hours of sun each day. Insufficient sunlight may cause your succulents to become spindly or to extend toward the light.

Between waterings, allow the potting mix to dry out.

Overwatering succulents is the most common error people make with them. Watering more deeply but less frequently is preferable. Before the next watering, completely saturate the potting mix (while making sure the water drains out of the drainage hole properly). The plant can finally perish if the potting soil is left moist every day.

Succulents should be fertilized at least once a year.

Fertilizer works best for plants in the spring (when the days lengthen and new growth starts) and again in the late summer. Use a water-soluble, balanced fertilizer (such as 8-8-8 or 10-10-10) that has been diluted to half the strength indicated on the container. Since succulents are semi-dormant in the winter, there is no need to nourish them. Because they are not actively growing, they do not require the nutrient boost.

Are succulents challenging to maintain?

It’s simple to get succulents to grow and thrive inside your home, regardless of the temperature where you reside. As long as they have sunlight and healthy soil, they may be kept just about anywhere else, however you should avoid placing them close to vents, gadgets, and dim areas.

Does misting succulents make sense?

When I first learned about succulents, I was fascinated by the notion that they couldn’t die. They were frequently referred to as very low maintenance plants that adored being neglected. That sounds fairly simple, hmm.

To add to my bewilderment, I frequently heard the word “succulent” used in the same sentence as the word “cactus.” We won’t get into it here because there is a really fantastic essay on this site that explains the link between cacti and succulents, but a widespread misconception regarding cacti is that they never require water. Because I believed succulents required little to no water, I occasionally misted them rather than watering them. They love to be ignored, right? They require little upkeep, right? Well, I hate to ruin the surprise, but my succulents barely made it through this abuse.

The scoop about misting and watering is as follows:

*Water: After the dirt has dried, drown your succulents in water. Put them in water until the bottom of the pot is filled with water. If you have a catch pan, remove any water that has accumulated there. The best kind of pots are unglazed, porous ones with drainage holes (think terracotta pots). Your succulents will appreciate that they allow them to breathe.

*Low Maintenance: Succulents grow in nature with shallow roots that quickly absorb water and store it in their leaves, stems, and roots for periods of drought. Succulents are considered low maintenance because of this. They are designed to hold water for extended periods of time, so you don’t need to water them as frequently as some plants, like every other day. They won’t wither and die while you’re away, so you may travel with confidence. Just remember to give them a good drink when you do water them!

*Water Type: Rainwater or distilled water are the ideal water types to utilize. Numerous minerals in tap water can accumulate in the soil and even appear on plant leaves.

*Watering Frequency: A number of factors determine how frequently you water (climate, season, humidity, pot size, pot type, drainage etc). The best general rule is to wait until the soil has dried before watering it again. The roots may decay if the soil isn’t given a chance to dry up or if water is left in the catch pan. You can stick your finger into the ground and feel around to determine the amount of moisture in the soil, or you can use a moisture meter (commonly sold in gardening centers or online and relatively inexpensive).

Leave the misting to the babies, please! Actually, fully developed succulents dislike being misted. Because they prefer dry environments, misting them will alter the humidity in the area around the plant. Additionally, this might cause decay. To gently hydrate your propagation babies’ tiny, sensitive roots, spray them.