What Is The Meaning Of Succulent

Any plant that has fleshy, thick tissues that can store water is considered succulent. Some succulents, like cacti, only store water in the stem and have no or few leaves, but other succulents, like agaves, primarily store water in the leaves. The majority of succulents are endemic to deserts or areas with a semiarid season and have deep or wide root systems. More than 60 plant families have succulent species, with the Aizoaceae, Cactaceae, and Crassulaceae having the highest proportions. Aloe, Echeveria, Kalanchoe, and other plants are among those that are grown as ornamentals and indoor plants.

The timing of the opening of stomata, which are tiny mouthlike structures on the surface of plant leaves and stems, is one adaptation shared by many succulents. Stomata enable the exchange of water and oxygen with the environment as well as the uptake of carbon dioxide from the environment. The stomata of many succulent plants are closed during the day and open at night, in contrast to those of most plants. As a result, less water loss (transpiration) happens during the hot, dry daylight hours, while carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake takes place at night. As a result, these succulent plants display crassulacean acid metabolism, a modified form of CO2 fixation and photosynthesis.

A succulent that connotes love

The succulent kalanchoe, often called widow’s thrill, is a member of the Crassulaceae family of stonecrops. This succulent, which represents eternal love, is a common houseplant.

Additionally, this plant represents wealth. Since it can withstand challenging circumstances, it is equated with endurance. It’s the ideal succulent to gift to a friend or family member.

Is succulent a good thing?

Wherever water and sunlight are combined, plants flourish. Some are mild; others are powerful. Every plant, no matter how big or small, has a symbol or a secret meaning that can be found by humans. Succulents are tenacious plants that retain water in their thick leaves and stalks, making them a symbol of enduring and timeless love.

They set a good example for us by using less water and thriving in extremely trying conditions, showing us that we are stronger than we think and that even the most trying circumstances are not the end of the line.

Succulents make amazing decor choices since they come in a variety of shapes that you can utilize to customize the appearance of your room. Here are a handful of our collection’s succulents.

What is a succulent?

Plants known as succulents have distinctive fleshy leaves that store sap. They have those leaves because it helps them retain as much moisture as possible. They can be found all throughout the world, but are most common in desert regions.

Succulents include a wide range of plant species. Succulents include cacti, aloe plants, and even orchids. Succulents are typically found in the same family as ZZ plants and other popular indoor plants. They are well-liked because they take little care, little pruning, and some species only need very little light to survive.

How did succulents get their name?

The thick, fleshy, sap-filled leaves that are the defining characteristic of succulents are what give them their name. Compared to plants with thinner leaves, they can hold and retain water more efficiently because to their leaves.

Where do succulents come from? Where did they come from originally?

Succulents initially originated in arid, dry regions like deserts. Even while certain succulents, like orchids, grow in places where the rain may not easily reach them, they do receive rainfall. Many succulents originate in Africa and other continents with protracted dry seasons when plants have developed means of more successfully storing and utilising water.

Why are succulents so popular?

Of course, succulents have been around for a very long time and have been used in indoor gardens and as office plants for a very long time. However, it appears that their popularity has increased in recent years. There are several causes for this:

  • They require little upkeep. They require minimal to no pruning and less watering.
  • They are available in a range of shapes, sizes, and colors. This includes really tiny plants in little pots that are perfectly suited for a desk.
  • They don’t draw as many pests. Plants frequently attract pests as a result of the ongoing requirement for irrigation. The risk of pests drastically decreases when you don’t need to water the plants as frequently, such with succulents. Succulents’ thick, waxy leaves make it more difficult for pests to pierce and feed through them.
  • It is simpler for greenhouses and shops to sell them. They are easier to transport because they can go for extended periods of time without water and can stay on a truck for days at a time. Because many succulents are tiny, producers can export huge quantities of them for less money. Some can even be shipped across the country in plastic bags. Additionally, they can be kept at the garden center for a lot longer and survive a lot longer.
  • Most people find it very challenging to outgrow. Some common indoor plants, like Pothos, have issues because they grow and eventually start to vine. This can be inconvenient and takes a lot of maintenance.

Where’s the best place to buy succulents?

Due to their growing popularity, succulents are now available almost wherever that sells plants. This can include everything from smaller big box stores to garden centers. Even some grocery stores that sell plants may have a selection of succulents.

How can you tell a succulent from other plants?

A unique class of plant is the succulent. They simply don’t look like other plants. Their leaves are one of the main variations. When you touch a succulent, the leaves are typically thicker than those of other plants and can have a rubbery feel to them. They often do not sit in extremely damp soil, and their roots tend to be relatively shallow (in fact, soil that is too moist is bad for them).

They are available in many different types, shapes, and colors. In order to be sure, ask an expert any queries you may have or study the labels that have been placed on the pot or in the plant’s soil.

Is there a difference between succulents and cacti?

It does appear that there is some debate among plant scientists over whether or not cacti are succulents. Although the majority of gardeners believe them to be a separate category of plants, some horticulturists disagree.

In the end, cacti do meet the criteria for being considered succulents. They don’t need a lot of water. Cacti lack leaves in favor of thick, green stems, but they have a special method for making the most of the little water they do receive. Some of them blossom, which makes them popular among plant lovers who prefer to have low-maintenance plants.

Is there a difference between succulents and air plants?

Succulents and air plants (Tilandsia spp.) are essentially in the same class and can both be categorized as succulents. Air plants frequently grow atop other plants or structures, such as tree branches, and have essentially no roots. They require almost no water at all and are quite robust.

Air plants only sometimes need to be misted, and the majority of the water that falls on their leaves is retained. They keep the little moisture they do receive by absorbing it. These days, they are highly popular since they can survive when delivered in groups in boxes or bags by absorbing the water released by other air plants.

Are succulents easy to take care of?

Succulents are quite popular for a variety of reasons, one of which is how simple they are to maintain. They don’t need to be replanted or require a lot of water (although you can if you wish to for aesthetic reasons). They require no pruning because of their slow growth.

Only the propensity for individuals to overwater succulents needs to be avoided. Despite the fact that it is quite obvious that plants don’t require a lot of water, people naturally want to water their plants every day. Succulents shouldn’t let this to happen. Just check to see if the soil is dry.

If you choose to water your succulent while keeping it in a saucer, take it out, hold it under the faucet, and let the water drain. Alternatively, if you use a watering can, water the plant, then check to see if it is still submerged later. If so, take it off the saucer and discard it. Avoid light watering (also known as “splash and dash”) when the soil is dry. Always water the plant properly when necessary, and drain any extra water.

Contact Ambius for more information about how we can provide succulents for your environment. We know how to properly care for succulents, so get in touch with us.

Are succulents expensive?

Succulents are often not extremely expensive, but because the family is so large and diverse, there are always outliers. There may be certain uncommon varieties of succulents that command a premium price. But generally speaking, the majority of succulents are fairly inexpensive. They may cost a little bit more than you would for a more common plant because they are special and frequently have unusual colors and shapes, but you get a more intriguing plant in exchange.

Make sure the plant is in good condition to make sure you get your money’s worth. Make sure to check the plant to see whether it appears to be in good condition if you want to buy succulents from a big-box retailer. Like any other plant, they become brown or yellow when they are ill or about to die. Despite being tough plants, if left unattended for too long, they may suffer.

Because succulents grow slowly, a small plant could be highly valuable and shouldn’t be given a fixed price merely because of its size. Succulents are generally more valuable per unit of size than the typical houseplant.

Are succulents poisonous?

Generally speaking, most succulents are not toxic, and they have a variety of health benefits.

For instance, the sap from the leaves of the succulent Aloe is recognized for treating burns and has been used to manufacture cosmetics like face creams. However, certain people may occasionally experience allergies to plants, even succulents. People with latex allergies should be extra cautious around sap-producing succulents (particularly succulents in the genus Eurphorbia). Anyone who has an allergy will most likely experience a cutaneous reaction like a rash.

Which succulents are safe for pets?

Once more, given the enormous variety of succulent species, most plants should be maintained as far away from animals as possible. Some succulents with long, sharp, stiff stems that could cause more bodily harm to pets provide the greater risk (such as to eyes). Succulents are generally safe for animals, though.

Which succulents prefer shade?

Even though it is well knowledge that succulents don’t require much water, some varieties can survive without much sunlight. But bear in mind that the majority of succulents thrive in hot, dry settings like deserts and other arid regions.

For more information about a plant’s light needs, always refer to the information that came with the plant.

Aloe—is it a succulent?

An easy-to-care-for, eye-catching succulent that grows well indoors is the aloe vera plant. Aloe vera plants are helpful as well because the juice from their leaves can be administered topically to treat the discomfort associated with burns and scrapes. How to cultivate and take care of aloe vera plants at home is provided here.

About Aloe Vera

Aloe vera is a species of succulent plant in the Aloe genus. The plant has thick, fleshy, greenish leaves that fan out from the stem at the center and is stemless or has extremely short stems. The leaf’s margin is toothed and serrated.

Be aware that you will require an area that delivers bright, indirect sunlight before you purchase an aloe (or artificial sunlight). If your aloe is located in an area that receives a lot of direct sunlight, you may need to water it more frequently because the plant might become overly dried up and develop yellow mushy leaves.

ALOE VERA LEAF GEL SHOULD NOT BE EATEN BY PEOPLE OR PETS. WARNING: Aloe vera leaf gel can be applied topically. It may even be harmful in higher doses and can result in unpleasant symptoms like nausea or indigestion.

Before Planting

  • Selecting the appropriate kind of container is crucial. It is advised to choose a pot made of terra-cotta or another porous material since it will allow the soil to completely dry between waterings and be weighty enough to prevent the plant from toppling over. You may also use a plastic or glazed pot, but they’ll hold more moisture.
  • Make sure you select a container with at least one drainage hole on the bottom when making your selection. This is crucial because the hole will let extra water drain away. Aloe vera plants are resilient, but poor draining can lead to rot and wilting, which is by far the most prevalent reason for this plant’s demise.
  • Choose a container that is around the same width as it is deep. Choose a container that is deep enough to allow you to bury the full stem of your aloe plant if it has one.
  • Use a well-draining potting mix, such as those designed for cactus and succulents, for aloe vera plants because they are succulents. Never use soil for gardening. Perlite, lava rock, bits of bark, or all three, should be used in an excellent mixture.
  • There is no requirement for a layer of gravel, clay balls, or any other “drainage material in the bottom of the pot. Only space that the roots could have used is being taken up by this. A hole for drainage is sufficient drainage!
  • Dust the plant’s stem with a rooting hormone powder before planting your aloe to help it produce new roots. Rooting hormone can be purchased online or at a nearby garden center or hardware store.

How to Plant (or Repot) an Aloe Vera Plant

It’s time to repot your aloe plant if it has become lanky, has become too big, or just needs an improvement. This is how:

  • Get your pot ready. Place a tiny piece of screen over the drainage hole after fully drying the new pot and giving it a fast rinse (or a good scrub, if it’s a pot you’ve used before). This will prevent soil from falling out the bottom and will allow water to flow correctly. Although these will degrade over time, a piece of newspaper or paper towel folded twice can also be used in a pinch.
  • Get your plant ready. Remove the aloe vera plant from its existing container and, taking care to avoid damaging the roots, brush away any extra dirt from the roots.
  • If your plant has puppies, get rid of them right away. (For information on how to take out and pot pups, see the “Care” section of this page.)
  • Trimming the stem can be done if your plant has an extremely long, spindly stem that won’t fit in the pot. Be aware that the plant could die if you do this. Trim the stem by cutting off a portion while keeping as much of it attached to the plant as you can. Take the naked plant next, and set it somewhere warm with indirect light. After a few days, the wound will develop a callus. Continue now with the repotting methods listed below.
  • Establish your plant. Place your plant in the soil after filling the pot with potting soil that drains properly approximately a third of the way. Remember to leave at least 3/4 of an inch of space between the top of the soil and the rim of the pot when you fill in the soil around the plant. The aloe plant’s bottom leaves should also be barely visible above the ground. After planting, stop watering.
  • Neglect your plant (temporarily). Don’t water your aloe for at least a week after putting it in its new pot. This will lessen the possibility of rot and give the plant more time to grow new roots. Keep the plant in a warm location with bright but indirect light until it appears to be rooted and content.

How to Care for an Aloe Vera Plant

  • Lighting: Use artificial light or direct, bright sunlight. The best window is one facing west or south. Low-light aloe plants can get lanky.
  • Aloe vera thrives at temperatures between 55 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13 and 27C). Most flats and residences have comfortable temperatures. You can bring your plant outside without issue from May to September, but if the nights are chilly, bring it back inside.
  • Fertilizing: Use a balanced houseplant formula blended at half strength only in the spring and summer, and fertilize infrequently (no more than once a month).
  • Repotting: When the roots become bound, repotted using the guidelines in “Planting, above.

Watering Aloe Vera

The hardest part of maintaining good aloe vera is watering, but it’s really not that complicated. Although the aloe is a succulent plant used to dry conditions, its thick leaves nevertheless require enough water.

  • Aloe vera plants need deep, but intermittent, watering. To put it another way, the soil should feel damp after watering, but you should let it partially dry out before you water it again. The roots of the plant may rot if the soil is kept excessively moist.
  • Allow the top third of the potting soil to dry out between waterings to make sure you aren’t overwatering your plant. For instance, if your plant is housed in 6 inches of potting soil, wait until the top 2 inches are completely dry before giving it another drink. (Check the soil’s dryness with your finger.)
  • Typically, you should water your aloe plant every two to three weeks in the spring and summer and even less frequently in the fall and winter. One general guideline for watering in the fall and winter is to roughly double the intervals between waterings (as compared to your summer watering schedule). In other words, water every four weeks in the winter instead of every two weeks in the summer.
  • When watering, some extra water could leak out the pot’s bottom. So that the soil may absorb as much of the water as possible, let the pot stand in it. After waiting 10 to 15 minutes, discard any leftover water.

Removing & Replanting Aloe Vera Offsets (Pups)

Offsets, also known as plantlets, pups, or “babies,” are frequently produced by mature aloe vera plants and can be removed to create a completely new plant (a clone of the mother plant, technically).

  • Utilizing pruning shears, scissors, or a sharp knife, locate the locations where the offsets are linked to the mother plant and remove them. Leave the offset with at least an inch of stem.
  • For several days, let the offsets remain free of soil; this will allow the offset to develop a callus over the cut, helping to prevent it from rotting. During this stage, keep the offsets in a warm area with indirect light.
  • Put the offsets in a typical succulent potting mix once they have developed calluses. The soil need to drain well.
  • Place the freshly potted puppies in a bright area. Keep the soil on the dry side and wait at least a week before watering.

How to Get Your Aloe Vera to Flower

A tall flower spike termed an inflorescence, which is occasionally produced by mature aloe vera plants, gives rise to dozens of tubular yellow or red blooms. The already beautiful aloe is surely given a new degree of intrigue by this!

Aloes cultivated as houseplants unfortunately rarely blossom because they need virtually perfect growing circumstances to do so: lots of sunshine, enough water, and the correct temperature range. Aloe blooms are typically only found on plants cultivated outdoors year-round in warm climates due to these needs (mostly lighting).

To increase the likelihood that your aloe will flower:

  • Give it as much light as you can, particularly in the spring and summer. Aloes can be kept outdoors in the summertime when the temperature is over 70F and the sun is shining (21C). Bring the aloe indoors if the temperature is expected to drop below 60F (16C) at night.
  • Note: Give your aloe time to acclimate to the harsh light before moving it from indoors to full sun. Otherwise, it could get sunburned. Prior to relocating it to a more sunny position, let it remain in partial shade for about a week.
  • Ensure that the plant receives the proper amount of water—enough to prevent it from drying out completely, but not too much to drown it! Make sure the plant isn’t getting constantly sopped by summer rains if it’s being maintained outside.
  • Provide your aloe with a suitable period of dormancy in the fall and winter. Aloe often flower in the late winter or early spring; therefore, allowing them a period of rest with less regular watering and milder temperatures may encourage them to flower.
  • If it continues to fail to flower, don’t be shocked. Despite our best attempts, most aloes simply can’t thrive indoors, so don’t be surprised if yours simply won’t blossom!

Aloe that stand out as appealing include:

  • or Partridge-Breasted Aloe, the Tiger (Aloe variegata) Short, smooth leaves with irregular white stripes make up this tiny aloe.
  • A little plant with delicately sawtoothed, white-spotted leaves is called a lace aloe (Aloe aristata).
  • Aloe Vera (Aloe glauca)
  • a bigger kind of aloe that has silver-blue leaves.