What Is The Best Way To Water A Succulent

Here is how to water succulents now that you are aware of the variables that influence how frequently you should water them. Yes, there are right and incorrect ways to do things. Native to the desert, succulents receive little rain in their natural settings, but when it does, it pours. Desert downpours resemble monsoons because sheets of water fall from the sky. When you water your succulent, soak it completely to simulate desert rain. Slowly pour water over it, continuing to do so until the drain hole at the bottom is completely filled. Succulents benefit more from irregular, cautious waterings that only moisten the top inch or two of the soil in the pot than they do from periodic, long, deep drinks that soak the soil to the bottom of the pot.

So when the earth around your succulent plants is completely dry, water it. Re-saturate the soil after allowing it to totally dry out. Dried up. Drench. Dried up. Drench. You can have succulents that are perfectly watered if you follow that pattern.

Do:

  • Water flowing downward till it exits the pot’s drainage hole from above: Succulents respond well to this kind of watering, which is the norm for most houseplants. Run a moderate, constant trickle of room-temperature water over the top layer of the soil in your succulent plant using a watering can or cup that has been filled. Your indication to quit is when water begins to flow from the pot’s drainage hole. Give the plant 15 minutes to absorb the last of the moisture. After that, empty any remaining liquid from the tray into the sink.
  • If your succulent’s soil is tightly packed and not appearing to be uniformly absorbing your top watering, you can try the bottom-watering method. The horticulture and owner of the Planthood store in Amsterdam, Monai Nailah McCullough, says that watering succulents from the top can occasionally cause damage to the roots. Watering it from the bottom allows it to slowly and effectively consume enough water. Put your succulent(s) in a shallow dish, plastic container, or tray that is 2 to 3 inches deep with water to bottom water them. Allow them to soak in the water for five to fifteen minutes, or until the top of the soil feels just damp to the touch. Refill as necessary.

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Don’t:

  • Mist its leaves: Succulents are not among the plant species that benefit from a good misting, although some do. Mirroring a plant’s natural surroundings is essential to ensuring its happiness in captivity. Additionally, because they are native to dry regions with low humidity, succulents are unaccustomed to having wet leaves. Thompson notes that “the water can get trapped and develop fungal concerns.” There is basically no point since they aren’t used to being sprayed.
  • Put it in a container with no drainage opening: Drainage holes act as a pathway for water that your plant is unable to absorb. Succulents definitely need it because they are so sensitive to overwatering.
  • Use ice cubes: Some plant owners use ice cubes to give their plants a more gentle and controlled soak because they disseminate a tiny amount of water very slowly. Again, though, if the goal is to simulate the succulent’s natural desert habitat, giving them something very cold makes little sense and might even startle them.
  • Water it less frequently, but more often: You should give your succulent a deep soak rather than a light misting every few days.

How frequently should indoor succulents be watered?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

How can I determine the best time to water my succulent?

Only water succulents when the soil has totally dried up. There isn’t a standard watering schedule that applies to all succulents in all environments.

Many indoor succulent growers discover that watering their plants every 14 to 21 days keeps them healthy. Use this timeline as a guide and make adjustments if necessary.

The earliest symptoms of underwatering on the leaves are the greatest time to water your succulents. To see what that looks like, have a look at the cheat sheet above.

The best course of action is to wait for a signal from your succulent before watering because most succulents are particularly susceptible to rot with regular watering.

And keep in mind how crucial it is to monitor your watering routine. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve assumed that I haven’t watered in a while, just to discover that it was only a few days ago thanks to my notes in the Succulent Tracker app (Apple | Android).

In this video, learn about a several factors that could influence how frequently you water your succulents:

Are your succulents misted?

When I first learned about succulents, I was fascinated by the notion that they couldn’t die. They were frequently referred to as very low maintenance plants that adored being neglected. That sounds fairly simple, hmm.

To add to my bewilderment, I frequently heard the word “succulent” used in the same sentence as the word “cactus.” We won’t get into it here because there is a really fantastic essay on this site that explains the link between cacti and succulents, but a widespread misconception regarding cacti is that they never require water. Because I believed succulents required little to no water, I occasionally misted them rather than watering them. They love to be ignored, right? They require little upkeep, right? Well, I hate to ruin the surprise, but my succulents barely made it through this abuse.

The scoop about misting and watering is as follows:

*Water: After the dirt has dried, drown your succulents in water. Put them in water until the bottom of the pot is filled with water. If you have a catch pan, remove any water that has accumulated there. The best kind of pots are unglazed, porous ones with drainage holes (think terracotta pots). Your succulents will appreciate that they allow them to breathe.

*Low Maintenance: Succulents grow in nature with shallow roots that quickly absorb water and store it in their leaves, stems, and roots for periods of drought. Succulents are considered low maintenance because of this. They are designed to hold water for extended periods of time, so you don’t need to water them as frequently as some plants, like every other day. They won’t wither and die while you’re away, so you may travel with confidence. Just remember to give them a good drink when you do water them!

*Water Type: Rainwater or distilled water are the ideal water types to utilize. Numerous minerals in tap water can accumulate in the soil and even appear on plant leaves.

*Watering Frequency: A number of factors determine how frequently you water (climate, season, humidity, pot size, pot type, drainage etc). The best general rule is to wait until the soil has dried before watering it again. The roots may decay if the soil isn’t given a chance to dry up or if water is left in the catch pan. You can stick your finger into the ground and feel around to determine the amount of moisture in the soil, or you can use a moisture meter (commonly sold in gardening centers or online and relatively inexpensive).

Leave the misting to the babies, please! Actually, fully developed succulents dislike being misted. Because they prefer dry environments, misting them will alter the humidity in the area around the plant. Additionally, this might cause decay. To gently hydrate your propagation babies’ tiny, sensitive roots, spray them.

Should you mist succulents with water?

Soak the soil around your succulents in water until the drainage holes are full. (Use less water if your container lacks drainage holes.) Don’t water your succulents using a spray bottle. Brittle roots and moldy leaves can result from misting. Additionally, you can submerge pots in a pan of water and let the water drain out the drainage hole. Remove from the pan as soon as the soil’s top is damp.

Can tap water be used to water succulents?

The best water to use for the majority of plants and succulents is distilled water or rainwater. Tap water frequently contains high levels of minerals like calcium or magnesium, which can accumulate in the soil or show up as white dots on the leaves.

Is it possible to hydrate succulents with ice cubes?

One of the most enjoyable pastimes you can engage in is caring for plants. They will not only give you many advantages, but they are also aesthetically beautiful. Simply ensure that you are aware of how to care for them.

Be mindful of the risks if you decide to attempt watering succulents with ice cubes. It’s conceivable that your plants will be harmed or killed if you subject them to such jarring temperature variations.

Any plant won’t like having its watered with ice cubes, succulent or not. To avoid stressing them out, it is preferable to use room temperature water. Additionally, you should plant plants in containers that encourage proper water drainage as well as good air circulation.

Why keep dying my indoor succulent plants?

Overwatering and poorly draining soils are the main causes of succulent deaths. Succulents need the soil to dry out between waterings because they are drought-tolerant plants. Succulents get root rot in wet soil, which turns their leaves brown, black, or yellow and gives them a withering appearance.

While overwatering is the most frequent cause of dying succulents, there are several other potential causes as well:

Succulent plants typically die back when they are kept in environments that are drastically different from their native habitat.

Replicating some of the minimal rainfall, full or partial sun exposure, and stony, well-draining soil conditions will help revive dying succulents.

Are succulents sun-loving creatures?

Succulents generally require at least 4-6 hours of sunshine each day to thrive. They enjoy being in places that are sunny and bright. Lack of sunshine will cause difficulties in succulents such elongation or etiolation, when the plants extend for more light. Weak stems and low growth are the results of this procedure. Lack of light causes succulents to lose their bright coloring and turn pale or back to a drab green tone. Plants that receive enough sunshine will display their whole spectrum of brilliant hues, showing their genuine beauty.

Without drainage, how much water should I give my succulents?

However, there are a few things that require extra consideration when it comes to watering succulents if you wish to grow them in pots without drainage holes.

Succulents should not be placed in pots without drainage holes since the water cannot escape. As a result, the roots may decay and the soil may become wet.

Knowing how much water to feed your succulents and how frequently is crucial for this reason.

How Much Water To Give Succulents In Pots Without Drainage Holes

Knowing how much water succulents require is essential if you plan to grow them in containers without drainage holes. The succulents may perish if they receive too little or too much water.

The soil should be watered well to a depth of about an inch, but not so thoroughly that water pools in the pot.

You can feed your succulents a little water at a time until about an inch of the pot is moist to gauge how much water to give them. Although too much water can cause it to collect in small pockets, you don’t need to saturate the soil.

To make sure you’re not giving your succulents too much or too little water, you can measure how much you’re giving them. To gauge how much water to give them, use a measuring cup or other device.

How Often To Water Succulents In Pots Without Drainage Holes

Knowing how frequently succulents require water is crucial when growing them in containers without drainage holes. If the soil is always moist, rot might develop and harm the plants.

Allowing the roots to partially dry out before providing additional water is essential when watering succulents without drainage holes. It’s crucial to avoid leaving the roots of succulent plants consistently damp for extended periods of time if you want to place them in pots without drainage holes.

Succulents in containers without drainage holes should ideally only receive water about every two weeks. Too much watering will cause the roots to rot and become damp, which can be fatal to the plant.

Before watering your succulents once more, you can test the soil with a moisture meter to see if it is dry.

If you don’t have a moisture meter, you can use your finger to feel how moist the soil is by pressing it into the pot; if only one inch of the pot feels damp, you should water it.

Watering Succulents In Pots Without Drainage Holes At The Right Time

When to water succulents in pots without drainage holes is another crucial consideration. Early in the day or late at night is the ideal time to water succulent plants.

Because their leaves dry up more quickly if they aren’t watered during the hottest part of the day, it is crucial to water succulents in the morning or the evening.

To avoid their leaves getting wet during the hottest part of the day, water succulents every two weeks in pots without drainage holes. You can water them in the morning or the evening.

How To Water Succulents In Pots Without Drainage Holes

How to water succulents in pots without drainage holes is another important consideration. While it’s crucial to avoid overwatering them, it can be difficult to provide them with enough water if there are no drain holes.

You can water your plants effectively while avoiding wet soil by using a number of techniques. Among them is a “pot that water itself.

Self-watering pots function by allowing water to collect at the bottom and gradually absorbing it through their porous sides. As a result, plants can receive enough water to last for several days or even weeks without needing to be watered again.

A watering can is an additional equipment that can be used to hydrate succulents in pots lacking drainage holes. In order to get water into the soil without having it pool on top of it, it is recommended to use a watering can with a narrow spout.

You may also employ a “Watering cans typically have a spout at the top; a watering wand has the spout at the end of a lengthy tube. By doing this, you may water succulents without wetting their leaves.

You can water them with a spray bottle if you don’t have one of these items. Just be cautious to avoid spraying the foliage and only the soil. Over-misting their leaves might make them decay.