What Is Succulent Mean

Any plant that has fleshy, thick tissues that can store water is considered succulent. Some succulents, like cacti, only store water in the stem and have no or few leaves, but other succulents, like agaves, primarily store water in the leaves. The majority of succulents are endemic to deserts or areas with a semiarid season and have deep or wide root systems. More than 60 plant families have succulent species, with the Aizoaceae, Cactaceae, and Crassulaceae having the highest proportions. Aloe, Echeveria, Kalanchoe, and other plants are among those that are grown as ornamentals and indoor plants.

The timing of the opening of stomata, which are tiny mouthlike structures on the surface of plant leaves and stems, is one adaptation shared by many succulents. Stomata enable the exchange of water and oxygen with the environment as well as the uptake of carbon dioxide from the environment. The stomata of many succulent plants are closed during the day and open at night, in contrast to those of most plants. As a result, less water loss (transpiration) happens during the hot, dry daylight hours, while carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake takes place at night. As a result, these succulent plants display crassulacean acid metabolism, a modified form of CO2 fixation and photosynthesis.

The meaning of the name “succulent”

To say that succulents are now popular would be an understatement. However, we believe their popularity is long overdue given how adorable they are, how simple they are to care for, and how many different colors there are. Here’s what you need to know before buying your next stonecrop or agave plant:

Due of their ability to store water in their leaves, succulents first appeared in regions that had extended dry spells (like Africa).

Sucus, which meaning juice or sap in Latin, is the root of the English word succulent. It also honors the nutritious leaves that enable these plants to endure in the sweltering heat (aka you only have to water yours once a week, since they thrive in sunlight and dry air).

Succulents in various shades of green are common, but you can also find them in blue, purple, pink, orange, and red!

Another benefit of these plants’ ease of maintenance. If your succulent is inside, the issue might be fungus gnats, mealybugs, woolly aphids, or spider mites (if you do suffer problems while your succulent is outside, you might be dealing with scale or aphids).

Snip off a succulent leaf, let it dry in the sun, then plant it in soil and water. This process is known as “propagating.”

Although not all succulents are cacti, cacti are succulents. A cactus’ thorns, which are essentially its leaves, are what distinguish it from other plants.

They have a very festive name because they bloom right before Christmas.

You may flaunt your green thumb on your wrist, ears, or fingers for weeks at a time because these plants require such little care.

To assist users in providing their email addresses, this content was produced and maintained by a third party and imported onto this website. You might be able to discover more details on this and related material at piano.io.

What accomplishes a succulent?

For those who enjoy a few pots of greenery on the desk at work or dispersed throughout sunny parts of the home, this ease of care is unquestionably beneficial. You’ve probably heard that succulents can enhance humidity in your dry house or office and assist remove harmful toxins from the air. This additional moisture relieves dry, irritated skin. Additionally, it can shield you from the common cold, dry cough, and sore throats.

Succulents can help with a variety of other medical conditions. The majority of us are aware that aloe vera juice and gel are marketed for reducing inflammation, particularly in the digestive tract. Parts of the yucca plant are also said to help with inflammation in other areas of the body. These plants’ saponins and other antioxidants are used to treat arthritis pain. To produce a tea for this use, boil yucca roots.

Sometimes succulents can help ease the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema. Due to the skin’s inability to fight bacterial infections, adult cases of childhood eczema frequently result in rash and itching. Succulents serve a dual purpose in helping to treat eczema because low humidity can occasionally bring on the symptoms.

Agave juice lessens pain from a number of conditions while accelerating the healing process. In addition to being used to make tequila, it is also used to treat toothache pain, stomach disorders, and other conditions that benefit from its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and vitamin-rich characteristics. Everyone should minimize their oral agave consumption, especially pregnant ladies.

Do succulents require sunlight?

Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

Aloe—is it a succulent?

An easy-to-care-for, eye-catching succulent that grows well indoors is the aloe vera plant. Aloe vera plants are helpful as well because the juice from their leaves can be administered topically to treat the discomfort associated with burns and scrapes. How to cultivate and take care of aloe vera plants at home is provided here.

About Aloe Vera

Aloe vera is a species of succulent plant in the Aloe genus. The plant has thick, fleshy, greenish leaves that fan out from the stem at the center and is stemless or has extremely short stems. The leaf’s margin is toothed and serrated.

Be aware that you will require an area that delivers bright, indirect sunlight before you purchase an aloe (or artificial sunlight). If your aloe is located in an area that receives a lot of direct sunlight, you may need to water it more frequently because the plant might become overly dried up and develop yellow mushy leaves.

ALOE VERA LEAF GEL SHOULD NOT BE EATEN BY PEOPLE OR PETS. WARNING: Aloe vera leaf gel can be applied topically. It may even be harmful in higher doses and can result in unpleasant symptoms like nausea or indigestion.

Before Planting

  • Selecting the appropriate kind of container is crucial. It is advised to choose a pot made of terra-cotta or another porous material since it will allow the soil to completely dry between waterings and be weighty enough to prevent the plant from toppling over. You may also use a plastic or glazed pot, but they’ll hold more moisture.
  • Make sure you select a container with at least one drainage hole on the bottom when making your selection. This is crucial because the hole will let extra water drain away. Aloe vera plants are resilient, but poor draining can lead to rot and wilting, which is by far the most prevalent reason for this plant’s demise.
  • Choose a container that is around the same width as it is deep. Choose a container that is deep enough to allow you to bury the full stem of your aloe plant if it has one.
  • Use a well-draining potting mix, such as those designed for cactus and succulents, for aloe vera plants because they are succulents. Never use soil for gardening. Perlite, lava rock, bits of bark, or all three, should be used in an excellent mixture.
  • There is no requirement for a layer of gravel, clay balls, or any other “drainage material in the bottom of the pot. Only space that the roots could have used is being taken up by this. A hole for drainage is sufficient drainage!
  • Dust the plant’s stem with a rooting hormone powder before planting your aloe to help it produce new roots. Rooting hormone can be purchased online or at a nearby garden center or hardware store.

How to Plant (or Repot) an Aloe Vera Plant

It’s time to repot your aloe plant if it has become lanky, has become too big, or just needs an improvement. This is how:

  • Get your pot ready. Place a tiny piece of screen over the drainage hole after fully drying the new pot and giving it a fast rinse (or a good scrub, if it’s a pot you’ve used before). This will prevent soil from falling out the bottom and will allow water to flow correctly. Although these will degrade over time, a piece of newspaper or paper towel folded twice can also be used in a pinch.
  • Get your plant ready. Remove the aloe vera plant from its existing container and, taking care to avoid damaging the roots, brush away any extra dirt from the roots.
  • If your plant has puppies, get rid of them right away. (For information on how to take out and pot pups, see the “Care” section of this page.)
  • Trimming the stem can be done if your plant has an extremely long, spindly stem that won’t fit in the pot. Be aware that the plant could die if you do this. Trim the stem by cutting off a portion while keeping as much of it attached to the plant as you can. Take the naked plant next, and set it somewhere warm with indirect light. After a few days, the wound will develop a callus. Continue now with the repotting methods listed below.
  • Establish your plant. Place your plant in the soil after filling the pot with potting soil that drains properly approximately a third of the way. Remember to leave at least 3/4 of an inch of space between the top of the soil and the rim of the pot when you fill in the soil around the plant. The aloe plant’s bottom leaves should also be barely visible above the ground. After planting, stop watering.
  • Neglect your plant (temporarily). Don’t water your aloe for at least a week after putting it in its new pot. This will lessen the possibility of rot and give the plant more time to grow new roots. Keep the plant in a warm location with bright but indirect light until it appears to be rooted and content.

How to Care for an Aloe Vera Plant

  • Lighting: Use artificial light or direct, bright sunlight. The best window is one facing west or south. Low-light aloe plants can get lanky.
  • Aloe vera thrives at temperatures between 55 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13 and 27C). Most flats and residences have comfortable temperatures. You can bring your plant outside without issue from May to September, but if the nights are chilly, bring it back inside.
  • Fertilizing: Use a balanced houseplant formula blended at half strength only in the spring and summer, and fertilize infrequently (no more than once a month).
  • Repotting: When the roots become bound, repotted using the guidelines in “Planting, above.

Watering Aloe Vera

The hardest part of maintaining good aloe vera is watering, but it’s really not that complicated. Although the aloe is a succulent plant used to dry conditions, its thick leaves nevertheless require enough water.

  • Aloe vera plants need deep, but intermittent, watering. To put it another way, the soil should feel damp after watering, but you should let it partially dry out before you water it again. The roots of the plant may rot if the soil is kept excessively moist.
  • Allow the top third of the potting soil to dry out between waterings to make sure you aren’t overwatering your plant. For instance, if your plant is housed in 6 inches of potting soil, wait until the top 2 inches are completely dry before giving it another drink. (Check the soil’s dryness with your finger.)
  • Typically, you should water your aloe plant every two to three weeks in the spring and summer and even less frequently in the fall and winter. One general guideline for watering in the fall and winter is to roughly double the intervals between waterings (as compared to your summer watering schedule). In other words, water every four weeks in the winter instead of every two weeks in the summer.
  • When watering, some extra water could leak out the pot’s bottom. So that the soil may absorb as much of the water as possible, let the pot stand in it. After waiting 10 to 15 minutes, discard any leftover water.

Removing & Replanting Aloe Vera Offsets (Pups)

Offsets, also known as plantlets, pups, or “babies,” are frequently produced by mature aloe vera plants and can be removed to create a completely new plant (a clone of the mother plant, technically).

  • Utilizing pruning shears, scissors, or a sharp knife, locate the locations where the offsets are linked to the mother plant and remove them. Leave the offset with at least an inch of stem.
  • For several days, let the offsets remain free of soil; this will allow the offset to develop a callus over the cut, helping to prevent it from rotting. During this stage, keep the offsets in a warm area with indirect light.
  • Put the offsets in a typical succulent potting mix once they have developed calluses. The soil need to drain well.
  • Place the freshly potted puppies in a bright area. Keep the soil on the dry side and wait at least a week before watering.

How to Get Your Aloe Vera to Flower

A tall flower spike termed an inflorescence, which is occasionally produced by mature aloe vera plants, gives rise to dozens of tubular yellow or red blooms. The already beautiful aloe is surely given a new degree of intrigue by this!

Aloes cultivated as houseplants unfortunately rarely blossom because they need virtually perfect growing circumstances to do so: lots of sunshine, enough water, and the correct temperature range. Aloe blooms are typically only found on plants cultivated outdoors year-round in warm climates due to these needs (mostly lighting).

To increase the likelihood that your aloe will flower:

  • Give it as much light as you can, particularly in the spring and summer. Aloes can be kept outdoors in the summertime when the temperature is over 70F and the sun is shining (21C). Bring the aloe indoors if the temperature is expected to drop below 60F (16C) at night.
  • Note: Give your aloe time to acclimate to the harsh light before moving it from indoors to full sun. Otherwise, it could get sunburned. Prior to relocating it to a more sunny position, let it remain in partial shade for about a week.
  • Ensure that the plant receives the proper amount of water—enough to prevent it from drying out completely, but not too much to drown it! Make sure the plant isn’t getting constantly sopped by summer rains if it’s being maintained outside.
  • Provide your aloe with a suitable period of dormancy in the fall and winter. Aloe often flower in the late winter or early spring; therefore, allowing them a period of rest with less regular watering and milder temperatures may encourage them to flower.
  • If it continues to fail to flower, don’t be shocked. Despite our best attempts, most aloes simply can’t thrive indoors, so don’t be surprised if yours simply won’t blossom!

Aloe that stand out as appealing include:

  • or Partridge-Breasted Aloe, the Tiger (Aloe variegata) Short, smooth leaves with irregular white stripes make up this tiny aloe.
  • A little plant with delicately sawtoothed, white-spotted leaves is called a lace aloe (Aloe aristata).
  • Aloe Vera (Aloe glauca)
  • a bigger kind of aloe that has silver-blue leaves.

Aloe Vera Gel

Remove a mature leaf from the aloe vera plant and cut it lengthwise to benefit from the plant’s calming effects. Lay the opened leaf, gel-side down, on top of the burn, or squeeze the gel from the leaf and apply it to the wound. Find out more about the therapeutic benefits of aloe vera.

  • Aloe vera serves as both a beautiful decoration for a kitchen shelf and a self-regenerating first aid kit. Learn more about how aloe vera can improve your health naturally.
  • Aloe can also be used for cold sores, but its most well-known use is to soothe sunburned skin.

Scale and mealybugs, two common indoor plant pests, are most likely to attack aloe vera plants.

Typical ailments include:

  • Root decay
  • Hard rot
  • bacterial stem rot
  • Leaf decay