What Happens If You Overwater A Succulent

Although there are general guidelines that are useful to know as a beginner succulent owner, perfecting the art of watering succulents takes time. When watering your succulents, keep these points in mind and make adjustments based on what works or doesn’t.

1. Succulents are prone to decay. Never let a succulent sit in a puddle of water, regardless of the variety. Remove excess water from saucers, avoid letting water pool on plants, avoid letting soil become soggy around leaves, and avoid letting roots rot in planters with poor drainage.

For extended periods of time, pools of water were always resting on these leaves. They’ve been overwatered, or flattened and turned into mush.

2. They will certainly survive prolonged droughts but probably not thrive in them. Some succulents, anywhere from a few times per week to once every two weeks, want to be watered more frequently than others. Most of the time, you should only water a succulent when the soil is completely dry (and drain).

3. During the winter, most succulents go dormant. Most people grow and bloom throughout the spring and summer, which need extra water. Water can be fatal to succulents during the dormant season, which is typically winter. In months of dormancy, watering needs to be drastically reduced, and in some cases, completely stopped. By doing some study, make sure you are aware of when your succulent goes dormant, and water accordingly.

4. They’ll communicate with you if they receive too much or too little water. Succulents’ leaves begin to resemble shriveled fingers that have spent too much time in the jacuzzi when they receive too much water. If leaves are overwatered, they frequently turn brown, decay totally, and then start to fall off.

Succulents frequently get dry, dark blotches on their leaves when they don’t get enough water. As the plants start to shrivel up, fleshier leaves will also appear and feel much more brittle and dry than typical. If the leaves seem wrinkled, try touching them. You can use it to determine whether they are being over or under watered. Underwatered leaves will be considerably stiffer and firmer than overwatered leaves, which will feel mushy.

How can overwatered succulents be fixed?

Yes, I am aware that it seems illogical to remove extra water from the soil, but bear with me. This is the justification. Too much water has already put the succulent under stress, and exposure to sunlight makes matters worse. Direct sunlight is a big no because most succulents require brilliant indirect light.

Place the succulent that has been overwatered somewhere dry and bright, but out of direct sunshine.

2. Permit the roots to breathe.

Cut off any brown or black roots as they are already rotting. Dig the succulent out of the ground and remove any excess soil that has become stuck to the roots. Place the plant on a mesh or other strainer until the roots have had two to three days to air dry. Replant the roots in the pot once they have dried completely.

Remove the entire root system and any puckered, spotty, black, or brown stems if the roots are entirely rotted. The succulent stem can be buried in the ground for propagation.

Keep the overwatered succulent on a mesh screen or other strainer until the roots have had two to three days to air dry.

3. Modify the ground

You might not need to entirely alter your succulent if it is already rooted in homemade or commercial succulent soil. Algae (green living matter) typically grows on soil that is too wet. If so, it is your responsibility to remove all of the top soil from the area around your plants and replace it with new succulent soil.

How can I tell if my succulent has too much water?

Okay, so we’ve talked a lot about succulents that are dry, but what about those that have received too much water? Well, if you recall, overwatering essentially causes those particular balloon-like cells to overfill and burst, leading to damaged cell structures and rotting leaves and roots.

Discoloration and a change in the shape of the leaves are the first indications of overwatering to look out for. The leaves will turn transparent, floppy, and squishy, and unlike those that have been under-watered, they won’t be retrieved by the plant. It won’t be simple for succulents to recover from this state, but they can. Taking leaves and cuttings to root and grow new plants is an alternative to rescuing the overwatered succulent.

How does a succulent look as it ages?

The leaves on your succulent may appear yellow, translucent, or wet. Your succulent is starting to die as a result of overwatering. A more serious condition is indicated by leaves that are brown or black and appear to be rotting. Therefore, you must begin saving your withering succulents!

How long does it take a plant that has been overwatered to recover?

If you follow the above instructions, your overwatered plant will typically recover in 714 days. It can take more time if there was significant damage. However, if there were sufficiently strong roots, results are frequently seen in as little as two weeks.

After repotting, give the soil a light watering and wait until it is dry before adding more. Avoid watering the plant excessively like you did previously, especially now!

Do succulents need to be in the sun directly?

1. Ensure that your succulents receive adequate light. Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

How frequently should succulents be watered indoors?

Indoor succulent plants probably need to be watered once a week. They require ample time for the soil to dry out in between waterings so that the water may be stored in the leaves. Use the following methods and advice while watering succulent plants inside.

  • Use an irrigation system with a little pour spout.
  • Fill the succulent plant’s center with water until it is completely submerged.
  • Allow water to completely drain out of the pot through the perforations. Make careful to empty any water that seeps through the soil if there is a saucer underneath the plant.
  • Since there won’t be enough heat and fresh airflow for the leaves to dry when planted indoors, avoid soaking the leaves to prevent rot from the top down.
  • Dry the soil completely in between waterings.

How frequently must I water my succulents?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

How can I tell if a succulent is about to die?

A succulent should be simple to care for. But there are a few things to know in order to maintain it healthy. How can you tell whether your succulent is prospering or dying, first?

Generally speaking, the following are typical signs that a succulent is perishing:

  • The roots are rotting if the leaves are brown and mushy.
  • Pale, yellow leaves are a sign of illness or rot that has spread.
  • Dehydrated, wrinkled leaves indicate that the roots are drying up.
  • Rot or infection was indicated by brown roots.

These are a few warning indications that your succulent may not be prospering. If you have one or more succulents and are worried that your plant is dying, continue reading to learn how to identify when your plant needs care.

How can wet soil be dried?

It is not difficult to dry out soil that has been overwatered. It only requires a little thought and work.

The techniques we have used to dry out overwatered soil are outlined below.

Stop Watering and Allow Time To Pass:

The best way to avoid overwatering the soil and plants is to wait until they are totally dry before watering again.

This will enable the water in the soil to evaporate and the plants to transpire the water that is already there.

Place Plants in the Windy Area:

The plants use wind to hasten the pace of evaporation. If you’ve been particularly generous to your plant and given it more water than it requires.

No need to freak out! bring the plant somewhere breezy. In order to promote transpiration, wind is a key factor. The plants will lose more water as the wind speed increases.

Place Plants in an Area With Low Humidity:

Theodore W. Tibbitts from the University of Wisconsin Madison claims that humidity directly affects transpiration by regulating the rate of plant water loss and stomatal opening.

Your plant will transpire more water than usual if you place it in a low-humidity region.

Placing your plant in a low humidity region with a warm temperature is a smart move to treat water saturation because humidity has a direct impact on stomatal gates.

Remove Any Mulch From The Top of The Soil:

Mulch is applied to the tops of plants to keep pests away and to slow evaporation.

Mulch assists with maintaining soil moisture. To fast dry the overwatered soil, make sure to remove the mulch from the top layer of the ground.

By getting rid of it, you’ll increase the rate of evaporation, causing extra water to evaporate more quickly.

Placing Holes at the Side of the Pot:

If the container doesn’t already have one, you can drill many holes into the side of it to increase drainage.

Make sure that no slabs or stones are inserted within the plant container so as to block the holes.

In addition to allowing water to drain from the soil, these drainage holes will also allow for better soil aeration and root development.

It can aid in the soil drying just as quickly, but being less typical than holes in the bottom.

Use a Hairdryer to Dry the Soil

It’s simple to get rid of the extra moisture by blow-drying the soil with a hairdryer.

The dryer will only dry the soil’s surface when it is pointed at it, leaving the remainder of the soil wet.

The dirt must be taken out of the container and spread around to let all the moisture evaporate. As a result, the soil’s moisture would be largely removed by the heated air.

In this situation, you might think about adding dry dirt while you’re at it or repotting the plant in fresh soil.

Another thing to think about is the possibility that if the dryer’s hot air gets too hot, it could kill a lot of the soil’s microorganisms. This may result in the soil’s ability to supply nutrients to the plant being diminished.

My plants stay healthy even after repotting thanks to the Miracle-Gro Potting Mix I get from Amazon. Clicking here will take you there.

Why do the leaves of my succulents come off when I touch them?

Although succulents are hardy plants that tolerate a lot of sunlight, heat waves can harm them if they are housed in dark-colored containers. Since most succulent plant leaves remain on the plant and only fall off when touched, this is typically not a problem. The stress brought on by heat and drought causes the leaves to fall off naturally.

If your plants experience this, you should move them to a location with reduced light exposure. As an alternative, you might think about covering them with a shade cloth to lessen the amount of exposure to the sun there.