What Color Are Succulents

Although succulents are typically distinguished by their deep green hue, did you know that there are many different hues of succulents? Succulents come in a wide range of colors, including vivid red, subdued blue, and many others. Some also have lovely accent hues like black, white, and yellow. A simple way to add color to your home and yard is to mix up your terrarium or planter with unusual succulents.

To make your area more colorful, we choose some of the greatest succulents. Spend some time learning about why succulents change color and how to take care of your plants before you get started.

Succulents may they be colored naturally?

You might be wondering whether all succulents can change color now that you know why they do. In a technical sense, they can. Some succulents, though, will always be green by nature. They won’t turn red, purple, or any of the other more “strange” hues that some other succulents might when exposed to various settings, however they might turn a lighter or darker shade of green.

The Elephant Bush and the Miniature Pine Tree are two succulents that are “evergreen.” If you purchase an evergreen succulent and it begins to turn yellow or brown, it is either the succulent itself that is unhealthy or the environment it is now in is too harsh for it to survive.

Colorful Succulents You Can Buy

While it is exciting to know that you can alter the color of the succulents in your garden, some colors are simply not available from a succulent that is not that color naturally.

The following selection of a few naturally colored succulents might help you add even more color to your succulent garden:

  • Zwartkop: An almost-black shade of deep maroon.
  • Purple Heart is a sort of dark blue-green color.
  • Pale purple with pink edges is Perle von Nrnberg.
  • Deep blue-green chalksticks
  • Yellow, green, pastel purple, blue, and spruce
  • Pink or light blue leatherpetal
  • Plant for Campfires: Red and Orange
  • saharan cabbage: dark red

It could seem like a near-impossible task to pull off getting your succulents to change color, but it is really not that difficult. As was already said, environmental factors can alter the colors of your succulent, but you can also artificially alter their hue.

Do only green succulents exist?

Where have succulents been all my life? I almost fell in love when perusing Debra Lee Baldwin’s alluring Succulent Container Gardens. These succulents with thick leaves and vibrant colors hold water in their juicy tissues, making them the ideal plant for forgetful gardeners. Your succulents will be as healthy when you get back from your trip as they were when you left if you give them well-drained soil and lots of sunlight. They might even appear better than before.

This is due to the fact that many succulents come alive with color when exposed to stimuli that could hurt or even kill other plants—additional sun, heat, or cold, or even a drought brought on by a gardener’s vacation. Green and blue-green leaves typically turn into a vibrant variety of reds, oranges, pinks, purples, and yellows when heated. Another benefit is that succulents frequently bloom in the winter. Therefore, you’ll receive your fill of flowers just when you need it most if you bring your frost-sensitive plants inside to protect them from the cold.

Are you prepared to develop a weakness for beautiful succulents as well? They require little maintenance and come in a wide range of colors.

What succulent has the most vibrant colors?

Here are a few of the vibrant succulent species.

  • Echeveria “afterglow Echeveria “afterglow
  • The subrigid echeveria “Fire and Ice”
  • Crassula capitella ‘Campfire’ thyrsiflora
  • Tirucalli’s euphorbia
  • Attenuated Haworthia
  • Luciae Kalanchoe
  • Nussbaumerianum Sedum
  • “Lipstick” Echeveria agavoides

Blue succulents: Do they exist?

Agave tequilana, sometimes known as “Blue Agave,” is the most famous of all blue succulents and is a magnificent evergreen succulent that is native to Mexico. Its four-foot-long, lance-shaped leaves are blue-grey with a brown spine in the center and little, prickly spines on the edges. A rosette of leaves growing six feet tall.

In five to eight years, this agave reaches maturity and sprouts a 20-foot-tall flower stalk topped with 20 to 25 branches that are covered in green flowers and purple stamens. The plant expires when it has finished blooming.

This agave requires direct sunlight and a warm environment; the temperature shouldn’t fall below freezing. Plant it in a poor soil that drains well and has a lot of coarse debris because it requires very little water.

The mother plant of the agave can be propagated using the abundant offsets it generates. Pick the ones with strong roots when they are a few inches tall and twist them away from the mother plant.

When repotting, exercise caution because the agave’s sap can irritate the skin. In Mexico, blue agave is used to make tequila.

Pink succulents: are they real?

Succulent plants exist in a range of forms, dimensions, and hues. Different hues of green may come to mind when people think of succulents, which are often referred to as drought-tolerant plants or desert plants.

Succulents actually come in a wide range of hues. Pink-hued succulents are among my all-time favorite colors, and I have a lot of favorites.

Pink succulents have the most beautiful appearances and change color according on the quantity and quality of light they receive. Pink succulents look fantastic on their own and also complement other succulents of all colors beautifully.

Here are 15 Stunning Pink Succulents You Would Love:

The distinctive features of moonstones are their hefty, oval-shaped succulent leaves, which come in a variety of pink, purple, mauve, and blue-green hues. They prefer direct sunlight and are indigenous to Mexico. They require a soil that drains properly. In between waterings, let the soil dry out. They can withstand minor freezing.

These are indigenous to South Africa, grow in bunches, and stay short and low. They feature leaves that range in color from green to pink to purple, and the stems and areas around the leaves of the plant are covered in white threads or hair-like growth. These prefer a soil that drains well and, if left in moist soil, are prone to fungal infections. Needs filtered, strong light.

Due of its beauty and toughness, a hybrid echeveria that is particularly well-liked. Grayish-blue leaves in the shape of a rosette, with a hint of purple and pink. The more sunlight it receives, the more vibrant the purple and pink tones become. It produces lovely flowers that are brilliant coral pink. Since it enjoys sunny conditions, this echeveria will thrive in either full sun or light shade with lots of sunlight. requires a soil that drains effectively.

Wide leaves on this lovely echeveria hybrid have distinct pink margins and come in lilac, mauve, and powdered blue colors. They blossom with stunning, deep orange blooms. Although it prefers direct sunshine, it can withstand other types of lighting, including partial shade and direct sunlight. requires a soil that drains effectively.

Echeveria Lauis, a native of Mexico, has grayish-blue leaves with a tinge of pink and mauve around the edges. These are exceptionally appealing plants that produce stunning purplish-mauvish pink flowers. Like the majority of echeverias, they are simple to grow and maintain. Give your plants enough sunlight and a soil that drains effectively. When the soil is dry, water it.

This lovely echeveria, which is native to Mexico, features powder-blue leaves with pinkish undertones along the borders. very simple to grow, cultivate, and spread. can be multiplied by taking leaf and stem cuttings, gathering seeds, or beheading. These can endure various lighting situations, although they choose a site that is sunny and bright. produces lovely coral pink blossoms. requires a soil that drains effectively.

Sedum Rubrotinctum ‘Aurora,’ a plant native to Mexico, has tiny, jelly bean-shaped leaves that are a light shade of pinkish mauve. As it is exposed to more sunlight, its pink hue grows stronger. They bloom with vibrant yellow flowers. Sedums are incredibly low maintenance plants that require very little care. Give your plants a lot of sunlight and a soil that drains nicely. These are among the most straightforward to grow from leaf and stem cuttings.

Graptoveria ‘Bashful’ is a hybrid that grows in stemless rosettes and has thick, plump leaves with rose-pink tinges on the tips that are a light apple-green in color. When exposed to additional sunlight, the pink hue on the leaves becomes more vibrant. prefers well-draining potting soil and bright, sunny situations.

The hybrid graptoveria ‘Debbie’ resembles echeverias in appearance. They have delicate, fleshy, pointed leaves that have a soft purple-blue tint and turn reddish-pink when exposed to direct sunlight or when under stress. It’s quite simple to develop and take care of this hybrid. seedlings, leaves, or stems may be used for propagation. Will withstand both full sun and little shade. In between waterings, let the soil dry out. Plant in a potting mix that drains properly.

Graptopetalum “Copper Roses,” a native of Mexico and Arizona, has stunning rosettes that range in color from light yellow-green to purple, pinkish-mauve. When exposed to the sun, the pinkish tones grow more intense. For them to display their full color potential, they require intense light. These plants require little maintenance. Give your plants a lot of sunlight and a soil that drains nicely.

These are plants with small, compact, plump leaves that are light blue-green in color with pinkish-red ends that are native to Central Mexico, and they grow in low-growing clusters of miniature rosettes. Stress, lower temperatures, and sun exposure make the pink color more intense. These are simple to grow and spread. They favor a sunny environment with lots of light. They require a potting soil that drains properly. Only water the soil if it is dry.

Their narrow, broad leaves range in color from pastel lavender to bluish-gray with a tinge of pastel pink when exposed to full sun. They grow as rosettes and are native to Mexico. These plants develop quickly. They produce white and yellow flowers that resemble stars. They favor places that are sunny or bright and potting soil that drains well.

The hybrid plant known as Graptosedum ‘Francesco Baldi’ was created by crossing Sedum Pachyphyllum with Graptopetalum Paraguayense. Except for the leaves being narrower and plumper, it resembles Graptopetalum paraguayense (Ghost Plant) in appearance. With stems that sprawl, spread, and expand as they grow, it generates rosettes. The leaves are large and thick, and they come in a variety of shades, including pastel lavender-pink, powdery blue-gray, and light blue-green. The plant bears vivid flowers in the form of stars. These are simple to cultivate and keep up. They do need a potting mix that drains properly and a lot of sunlight.

Calico Kitten, also known as Crassula Pellucida Variegata, is a lovely plant with heart-shaped, multicolored variegated leaves. The leaves are a mixture of several tones of pinks and creams, as well as various shades of green, ranging from pale green to golden green. When under direct sunlight, they take on a dark purple color. When placed in a hanging basket, the plant trails beautifully. They blossom in white. These require a soil that drains well. Only water the soil if it is dry. The initial maintenance of this plant might be challenging, but with patience and the right care, they become more resilient.

The Crassula Perforata (String of Buttons), a succulent native to South Africa, sprawls and piles on top of itself as it grows. They have tiny, compact leaves that resemble spirals and wrap around the stem. The leaves have rose pink borders and a soft light green tint. When exposed to additional sun, the color deepens. When planted together, String of Buttons and other succulents with pink tones complement each other beautifully. Maintaining this plant is simple. Give your plants enough sunlight and a potting mix that drains effectively.

Please visit my Resource Page for additional suggestions if you’re wondering where to buy succulents online.

About

You’ve come to the correct location if, like me, you enjoy succulents. This website is a repository for the succulent-growing knowledge I’ve accumulated over the years and am still learning. Although I am by no means an expert on succulents and cacti, this website was created as a result of years of hard work, love, and many mistakes and learning opportunities.

My succulent is pink, why?

You might get really concerned if the succulent in your home turns pink because you think it might be dying.

In reaction to environmental conditions, succulents turn pink. It typically takes quite a bit of stress for some of the hardiest and most durable houseplants to change the color of their foliage.

You must keep in mind that succulents adapt to their settings, and when these environments or their care undergo unexpected changes, they will react since they do not handle sudden change well.

The most frequent stressors that lead to the pinking of succulents include excessive or insufficient sunlight, incorrect watering, root rot, temperature shifts, and nutrient deficiencies.

Too much sunlight

One of the most frequent causes of your succulent turning pink is because it is suddenly exposed to more light than it has ever experienced, which causes sunburn.

The foliage will turn pink as a result of this sunburn. Succulents that have been kept indoors for months and are suddenly moved to the outdoor garden frequently experience this. The succulent plant may experience some shock when exposed to the bright light on its leaves.

If your succulent is positioned too close to a glass window, the glass will magnify the sun’s rays before they reach the leaf of the plant, which is another way it can get sunburned. Plants placed in windows facing the south frequently do this.

Remedy

Transfer your plant to a new location where it may only receive indirect light for six hours each day, such as a patio or one foot away from a west-facing window, to correct this discolouration brought on by too much sunlight.

If you intend to move an indoor plant to your outside garden, acclimate the plant gradually by progressively increasing the amount of time it spends in the light each day. Up until the plant has completely adapted to its new environment, keep up the acclimatization.

If you give your succulent a few days to adjust to increasing amounts of light, it won’t suffer from sun damage and you should be able to keep its green hue.

Not enough light

When a succulent receives less light than it requires daily, this might also cause it to turn pink.

When certain succulent plants are under stress from insufficient light, such as some cacti, anthocyanins are produced. The pinkish color of the plant’s leaves is caused by the combination of the purple pigment anthocyanin and the green pigment chlorophyll.

Keep in mind that succulents require sunshine to survive and operate normally. They cannot undertake photosynthesis without it, which prevents them from growing their own food.

The yellowing of a succulent that isn’t getting enough light can be easily remedied. Simply move it to a location where it will have access to the constant, brilliant indirect light that it requires.

Overwatering

Your succulent is receiving too much water, which is another cause of its pinking.

This might be the case if you water it more frequently than you should or if you give it more water than it requires each time. In any case, this causes overwatering, which causes root rot.

The condition known as root rot is brought on by a plant’s roots spending an extended period of time drowning in damp soil. The decaying dead roots will start to attract opportunistic infections like fungus and bacteria. As a result of these diseases, the rot will spread more quickly and eventually kill the entire plant.

The leaves on your plant may become yellow, pink, red, or brown and become soft and mushy to the touch as a sign that it is overwatered.

The wrong potting mix might also contribute to overwatering. Succulents want potting soil that is porous and airy so that water and air may easily pass through it. Additionally, if the pot you use doesn’t have drainage holes at the bottom, this can also result in an accumulation of water that can cause root rot.

You must immediately stop watering your succulent if you notice that it may be turning pink from overwatering.

Take the plant out of the pot, then wash the roots to remove as much of the old soil as you can. So as not to harm the delicate roots, go slowly. Examine all of the roots, and using sterile scissors, remove any areas that have gone brown or black.

After that, place the plant on a clean piece of paper towel and let it air dry for a few hours.

Prepare a fresh container with drainage holes at the bottom, and fill it two-thirds with new succulent-specific potting soil.

After putting the plant in the middle of the dirt, add more potting soil to fill the container up. Gently tap the ground close to the plant’s roots.

The soil won’t need any additional moisture; it’s already damp. Before watering the newly potted plant, wait at least a week.

Check the top two inches of soil with your finger before watering your plant to prevent overwatering. If the soil is humid, wait one or two days before examining it again. If the soil is dry, water it.

Underwatering

Although it may not be as harmful as overwatering, underwatering can nonetheless result in your succulent turning pink.

A succulent’s foliage will first turn pink, then purple, and then turn brown if it does not receive enough water. The leaves will wrinkle and get crispy as they dry out.

Fortunately, a succulent that has been underwater is much simpler to cure than one that has been overwatered.

To restore the succulent to health, you will need to wet and dry it. Water the plant five times with water that is equal to the volume of the pot when the soil is completely dry.

After watering the soil, wait until the top two inches feel dry to the touch before watering it again.

A succulent only has to be watered on a regular basis when the soil is dry. By doing this, you can prevent your plant from being both overwatered and underwatered.

Changes in temperature

Your succulent may also be becoming pink since you are subjecting it to temperatures that are far higher than they are accustomed to.

This might be because the plant is in direct, unfiltered sunlight, it’s next to a radiator, or it’s located where a heater is blowing heated air directly at it.

The plant will release anthocyanin as a result of the heat stress, which is, as previously said, a purplish pigment that takes on a pink hue when combined with chlorophyll in the plant.

Your succulent may have tissue damage as a result of excessive heat, which may impair photosynthesis and produce more discoloration.

The plant will also experience temperature stress and develop pink discolouration if it is placed in an area where it will be hit by cold air, such as next to an air conditioner or a door or window that allows in cold drafts.

Simply move your plant to a location where it won’t be exposed to extremes of heat or cold to correct any discolouration brought on by temperature variations.

A room that is between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit is the ideal temperature for keeping an indoor succulent.

Nutrient deficiency

When plants are deficient in certain elements, such as phosphorus, nitrogen, or magnesium, succulents can also turn pink.

For instance, phosphorus is required by succulents in order to synthesize the sugars and nucleic acids that serve as their source of energy.

Along with turning pink, other symptoms of nutritional shortage include wilting and yellowing.

Because the succulent’s soil will eventually get devoid of nutrients and minerals if you wait too long to repot it, this might also result in nutrient deficit.