What Are The Different Types Of Succulent Plants

Learn about the various succulent species you may grow as an indoor or outdoor plant. Rekindle your love for these plants and discover how special and low-maintenance they are.

Succulents are low-maintenance plants that are frequently confused with cactus. In actuality, there are approximately 1,300 species of succulent cactus. There are about 60 different succulent families and 10,000 different plant varieties, all of which vary in size, color, and texture.

Regardless of the species, succulents will astound you with their intricate growth patterns, resistance to drought and other harsh conditions, simplicity of care, and striking beauty.

With the help of this article, we hope to persuade the general public of the superiority of succulents as indoor or outdoor plants. It’s an excellent option of plant, especially if you reside in an area that frequently endures severe drought seasons, as they require less watering than other plant varieties.

Continue reading to discover the basic characteristics of many succulent species, their habitats, lifestyles, methods of maintenance, and 17 of the most beautiful varieties.

What succulent is the most popular?

The popularity of succulent plants is explained. They not only thrive on their own but also work well with other kinds of plants. Additionally, the Pantone color of the year, Greenery, is totally on style with succulents! Succulents come in a variety of sizes, hues, and styles that may be used in anything from a child’s room to a home office.

Succulents that are grown inside do best in conditions that are dry and low in humidity. While they prefer direct sunshine, they can also tolerate less intense lighting, which makes them perfect for interior design. The top 10 indoor succulent plant types are listed in the following paragraphs.

Succulent IdentificationWhy It Matters

When you adore succulents, it becomes crucial to know their names at some time. The correct identification of succulents, as I have discussed before, can actually mean the difference between life and death! Despite having quite diverse traits, many varieties of succulents may have the same common name or a comparable look. Their ability to weather the winter makes a difference sometimes. A misidentification of a succulent could result in plants that have died from the cold. Some succulents, though, are poisonous to kids and dogs. Pets and young children can safely consume Sedum morganianum, however Euphorbia myrsinites is extremely hazardous. To protect your family and plants, take care to understand how to identify the types of succulents you have.

Recognizing Different Types of Succulents

A succulent plant is any plant that holds water in its leaves, stems, or roots. The appearances of many types vary greatly from one another. Succulent varieties can, however, seem quite alike. Two genera that are frequently mistaken for one another are Echeveria and Sempervivum. Hens and chicks is the popular name for both. Each plant forms a substantial rosette, giving them a similar appearance. They replicate similarly, each creating offsets. The young succulents that emerge at the base and spread out next to the main rosette are known as succulent offsets. But while the other perishes with just one freeze, the first survives at temperatures much below zero.

You will eventually be able to identify more varieties of succulents solely by appearance. Even if you are now unable to distinguish between a Sempervivum and an Echeveria, if you keep looking and looking for the differences, eventually you will be able to. Sounds strange, I realize. However, just as you are aware of your own child, even when they are surrounded by other children, Or perhaps you are only familiar with your own cat. One skill we all have is the ability to notice subtle differences. Simply said, we employ this expertise in a variety of ways. Perhaps you can identify the differences between 1960s muscle vehicles. I can distinguish between wolves and coyotes. Some people can easily tell a Cabernet from a different vintage apart, or they can recognize different bird species by their cries. Succulent identification only requires practice.

In the image above, there is one obvious difference between Sempervivum and Echeveria. Do you see how the sempervivum’s leaf border is covered in a plethora of tiny hairs? Those hairs are ciliates. A ring of minute hairs called ciliate (SILL-ee-uht) hairs extends along the… They gather dew for the plant in its desert environment. Sempervivum has few echeveriado, but these ciliate hairs. Most likely, your plant is not an Echeveria if the margins are covered in microscopic hairs. (The leaves of fuzzy echeveria are covered in fine hairs.)

Identifying SucculentsNote Characteristics

Another frequent query in identifying succulents is how to differentiate between Aeonium and Echeveria. Additionally, certain Aeonium feature ciliate hairs. The stems of Aeonium and Echeveria, however, are another difference. Echeveria rosettes generally develop close to the soil surface, like Sempervivum. However, aeonium develops long, branching, woody stems with rosettes at each terminal.

Look for the details to tell apart various succulent varieties. As we’ve seen, some types have smooth leaves while others have ciliate hairs along the leaf margins. Observe the leaf thickness as well. The leaves of Echeveria are generally thicker than those of Sempervivum or Aeonium, but not as thick as those of Graptopetalum. Here are a few plant traits to consider when determining whether a plant is a succulent:

How can I tell what kind of indoor succulent it is?

Succulents can be distinguished most easily by their growth pattern and leaf form. Of course, succulents differ from other plants due to their fleshy leaves.

Some succulent species have thick, rosette-shaped leaves that give the plant a spiky appearance. Other varieties of succulents feature leaves that are spiky, round, smooth, or strappy in shape. You could see tiny ‘babies’ sprouting along the leaf edges of some succulent species.

Some succulent species might be challenging to distinguish from one another. Images of an echeveria and sempervivum, for instance, could be strikingly similar. This is due to the fact that both of these succulent genera belong to the same family of plants with fleshy leaves.

How frequently should a succulent be watered?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

Which succulent is the best?

Below, we’ve included our top picks for succulent plants.

  • Haworthia short-tailed.
  • Peperomioides Pilea
  • The elegans echeveria.
  • Sempervivums.
  • American agave.
  • Dasyphyllum sedum.
  • Gollum-like Crustula
  • aristata aloe.

Which succulents thrive indoors the best?

Over the past few years, succulents have skyrocketed in popularity, and for good reason. There are countless distinctive kinds available, and even beginners can grow most of them. They can live in settings that are too dry for most other plants because of their unique water-storing tissues, so they will persist even if you neglect to water them for a long. You don’t need to do anything different to grow a succulent in your living room because succulents also flourish in dry air and mild temperatures, which are characteristics found in most homes. Here are a handful of the top indoor succulents to buy as you begin your collection if you’re a novice plant owner. They are simple to locate at garden centers and nurseries and adapt nicely to life indoors.

Do succulents require sunlight?

Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

What are some succulent garden planting tips?

Just like in any garden, you must select plants that speak to you. What kinds of plants you want depends on whether the garden will be indoors or outdoors. That advice also holds true if you’ve made the decision to develop a succulent garden. Pick the ones that seem good to you and that you enjoy.

Watching how frequently you water the plants is the other piece of advice. Keep in mind that succulents don’t require a lot of water because of their nature. Throw away any extra water that collects after you water your succulents in saucers if you are keeping them inside. If you selected an air plant variety, simply spray the plants.

In addition, make sure you read the instructions that come with the plants and consult with a plant or gardening expert if you have any doubts about how to take care of any particular plants you intend to add to your garden.

How do you take care of succulents? Do succulents need pruning?

One of the low-maintenance plants you will come across is possibly a succulent. That depends on the variety you have selected, of course. Succulents, on the other hand, grow slowly by nature, and the vast majority of species do not vine like other plants. They don’t typically require pruning, which is why they are so well-liked for indoor plants. They require hardly any pruning and very little moisture.

Read the instructions that often accompany with the plants you purchase for maintenance. Do not overwater them or allow the water sit on the plants.

Contact Ambius if you manage a commercial property and need succulents that will be well-maintained.

How do you water a succulent? Is there anything special to know?

The best approach to water a succulent is to take it out of its saucer and water it with lukewarm tap water, just like you would other plants. Replace it in the saucer you are using underneath the pot after letting the water entirely drain through it. Later, check to see if any extra water has collected beneath the plant and discard that.

Never forget that succulents cannot endure prolonged wet, muddy soils. See if the soil seems very dry by inspecting it. Check the watering guidelines included with the plant you purchase as well.

When should someone plant succulents?

There is no planting season because the majority of people utilize succulents inside. Any time of year is suitable for setting up an indoor succulent garden. The greatest times to plant succulents outside, though, might be in the spring or summer.

Succulents need to be planted when the soil can be handled, even though they are hardy and can even survive the winter rather well.

If planted during the warmer months, they will probably fare considerably better.

In what soil should a succulent be planted?

Succulents are typically already planted when you go to buy them. It will probably be soil. Succulents are fantastic since they require little care. Succulents shouldn’t typically be taken out of the container they were shipped in, nor should the soil be changed.

Of course, succulents tend to prefer coarse, rockier, sandier, well-drained soil if you are building any type of indoor succulent garden and have to take them from the pots and the soil that they arrived in.

Succulents actually thrive on inorganic soils like silt, clay, or sand. They don’t require a lot of soil because they have rather shallow root systems. Finally, despite the fact that many succulents are sold in tiny pots or containers, there is no need for concern. Succulents thrive in small pots and containers due to their nature.

Where should I plant succulents?

Succulents should be planted in an area that receives plenty of sunlight if you live in an arid region where they will flourish. Remember to ask your garden center’s professionals about planting requirements if you have any questions.

Should succulents only be planted indoors or are there outdoor succulents?

There are many different kinds of succulents, and some of them thrive both indoors and outdoors. Where you reside and the climate there can have a big impact. Keep in mind that succulents prefer dry, hot, and arid locations; they do not require a lot of moisture and probably won’t flourish as well there.

The brevity of the response is, however, both. They can be cultivated both inside and outside.

How much sunlight do cacti require?

It might be challenging for succulents to receive adequate sunlight inside. They typically require 6 hours each day of bright, indirect sunshine outside.

However, indoors, you should put your succulents close to a window that receives light throughout the day. Place your succulents close to the brightest window or area of your house or office if this is not an option.

Watch this video to learn more:

The plant aloe vera is it a succulent?

An easy-to-care-for, eye-catching succulent that grows well indoors is the aloe vera plant. Aloe vera plants are helpful as well because the juice from their leaves can be administered topically to treat the discomfort associated with burns and scrapes. How to cultivate and take care of aloe vera plants at home is provided here.

About Aloe Vera

Aloe vera is a species of succulent plant in the Aloe genus. The plant has thick, fleshy, greenish leaves that fan out from the stem at the center and is stemless or has extremely short stems. The leaf’s margin is toothed and serrated.

Be aware that you will require an area that delivers bright, indirect sunlight before you purchase an aloe (or artificial sunlight). If your aloe is located in an area that receives a lot of direct sunlight, you may need to water it more frequently because the plant might become overly dried up and develop yellow mushy leaves.

ALOE VERA LEAF GEL SHOULD NOT BE EATEN BY PEOPLE OR PETS. WARNING: Aloe vera leaf gel can be applied topically. It may even be harmful in higher doses and can result in unpleasant symptoms like nausea or indigestion.

Before Planting

  • Selecting the appropriate kind of container is crucial. It is advised to choose a pot made of terra-cotta or another porous material since it will allow the soil to completely dry between waterings and be weighty enough to prevent the plant from toppling over. You may also use a plastic or glazed pot, but they’ll hold more moisture.
  • Make sure you select a container with at least one drainage hole on the bottom when making your selection. This is crucial because the hole will let extra water drain away. Aloe vera plants are resilient, but poor draining can lead to rot and wilting, which is by far the most prevalent reason for this plant’s demise.
  • Choose a container that is around the same width as it is deep. Choose a container that is deep enough to allow you to bury the full stem of your aloe plant if it has one.
  • Use a well-draining potting mix, such as those designed for cactus and succulents, for aloe vera plants because they are succulents. Never use soil for gardening. Perlite, lava rock, bits of bark, or all three, should be used in an excellent mixture.
  • There is no requirement for a layer of gravel, clay balls, or any other “drainage material in the bottom of the pot. Only space that the roots could have used is being taken up by this. A hole for drainage is sufficient drainage!
  • Dust the plant’s stem with a rooting hormone powder before planting your aloe to help it produce new roots. Rooting hormone can be purchased online or at a nearby garden center or hardware store.

How to Plant (or Repot) an Aloe Vera Plant

It’s time to repot your aloe plant if it has become lanky, has become too big, or just needs an improvement. This is how:

  • Get your pot ready. Place a tiny piece of screen over the drainage hole after fully drying the new pot and giving it a fast rinse (or a good scrub, if it’s a pot you’ve used before). This will prevent soil from falling out the bottom and will allow water to flow correctly. Although these will degrade over time, a piece of newspaper or paper towel folded twice can also be used in a pinch.
  • Get your plant ready. Remove the aloe vera plant from its existing container and, taking care to avoid damaging the roots, brush away any extra dirt from the roots.
  • If your plant has puppies, get rid of them right away. (For information on how to take out and pot pups, see the “Care” section of this page.)
  • Trimming the stem can be done if your plant has an extremely long, spindly stem that won’t fit in the pot. Be aware that the plant could die if you do this. Trim the stem by cutting off a portion while keeping as much of it attached to the plant as you can. Take the naked plant next, and set it somewhere warm with indirect light. After a few days, the wound will develop a callus. Continue now with the repotting methods listed below.
  • Establish your plant. Place your plant in the soil after filling the pot with potting soil that drains properly approximately a third of the way. Remember to leave at least 3/4 of an inch of space between the top of the soil and the rim of the pot when you fill in the soil around the plant. The aloe plant’s bottom leaves should also be barely visible above the ground. After planting, stop watering.
  • Neglect your plant (temporarily). Don’t water your aloe for at least a week after putting it in its new pot. This will lessen the possibility of rot and give the plant more time to grow new roots. Keep the plant in a warm location with bright but indirect light until it appears to be rooted and content.

How to Care for an Aloe Vera Plant

  • Lighting: Use artificial light or direct, bright sunlight. The best window is one facing west or south. Low-light aloe plants can get lanky.
  • Aloe vera thrives at temperatures between 55 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13 and 27C). Most flats and residences have comfortable temperatures. You can bring your plant outside without issue from May to September, but if the nights are chilly, bring it back inside.
  • Fertilizing: Use a balanced houseplant formula blended at half strength only in the spring and summer, and fertilize infrequently (no more than once a month).
  • Repotting: When the roots become bound, repotted using the guidelines in “Planting, above.

Watering Aloe Vera

The hardest part of maintaining good aloe vera is watering, but it’s really not that complicated. Although the aloe is a succulent plant used to dry conditions, its thick leaves nevertheless require enough water.

  • Aloe vera plants need deep, but intermittent, watering. To put it another way, the soil should feel damp after watering, but you should let it partially dry out before you water it again. The roots of the plant may rot if the soil is kept excessively moist.
  • Allow the top third of the potting soil to dry out between waterings to make sure you aren’t overwatering your plant. For instance, if your plant is housed in 6 inches of potting soil, wait until the top 2 inches are completely dry before giving it another drink. (Check the soil’s dryness with your finger.)
  • Typically, you should water your aloe plant every two to three weeks in the spring and summer and even less frequently in the fall and winter. One general guideline for watering in the fall and winter is to roughly double the intervals between waterings (as compared to your summer watering schedule). In other words, water every four weeks in the winter instead of every two weeks in the summer.
  • When watering, some extra water could leak out the pot’s bottom. So that the soil may absorb as much of the water as possible, let the pot stand in it. After waiting 10 to 15 minutes, discard any leftover water.

Removing & Replanting Aloe Vera Offsets (Pups)

Offsets, also known as plantlets, pups, or “babies,” are frequently produced by mature aloe vera plants and can be removed to create a completely new plant (a clone of the mother plant, technically).

  • Utilizing pruning shears, scissors, or a sharp knife, locate the locations where the offsets are linked to the mother plant and remove them. Leave the offset with at least an inch of stem.
  • For several days, let the offsets remain free of soil; this will allow the offset to develop a callus over the cut, helping to prevent it from rotting. During this stage, keep the offsets in a warm area with indirect light.
  • Put the offsets in a typical succulent potting mix once they have developed calluses. The soil need to drain well.
  • Place the freshly potted puppies in a bright area. Keep the soil on the dry side and wait at least a week before watering.