Is Garden Soil Good For Succulents

Succulent soil is the basis for a plant’s ability to thrive, whether you are planting succulents outside or indoors. Larger soil particles are necessary for succulents to have a well-draining soil that allows water to enter quickly and drain away from the roots without compacting the soil. Use a soil test kit to verify the ideal soil for succulents and adjust the soil to a pH range of 6.0 to 6.5 before planting.

  • Succulents prefer well-draining soil and have short root systems.
  • The ideal soil is one that is nutrient-rich, loose, and rocky.
  • Use a potting mix designed specifically for succulents and cacti when planting in containers, and place the plant in a pot with drainage holes at the bottom.
  • Succulent plants could die off if their soil is too alkaline.
  • Add soil amendments to the existing soil to make it more suitable for succulents’ needs.

Can I grow succulents in garden soil?

To create your own succulent soil, start with any ordinary potting soil type. Use whatever you have available as long as it is sterile and fresh.

I use a variety of brands, depending on what is on sale when I need to buy potting soil. The best basis for potting mix for succulents is one that is light and porous.

Avoid using heavy garden soils, vermiculite-containing mixtures, and soils that advertise moisture retention or additional moisture management. Succulents require potting soil that drains properly rather than one that retains moisture.

What occurs when succulents are planted in normal potting soil?

In their natural habitat, succulents will flourish in sandy soil or even gravel. With this kind of soil, the succulent never has wet feet since the water can drain through.

  • If you only have potting soil on hand, adding crushed stones or coarse sand will be essential because succulents demand well-drained soil.
  • A succulent soil must be able to store nutrients and water and then release them when the plant requires them.
  • To breathe and easily pierce the soil mixture, the roots need air pathways in the soil.
  • A healthy soil should hold the succulent plant upright, encourage root expansion, and anchor the roots.
  • A good succulent mixture should not contain an excessive amount of nitrogen because this will result in huge, leggy leaves.

Do succulents require certain soil?

Regular potting soil from your yard won’t work for succulents since they need soil that drains. Select cactus soil or potting soil that has been mixed with sand, pumice, or perlite. Be gentle when repotting because succulent roots are extremely brittle.

Does topsoil work well with succulents?

These are some very fundamental DOs and DON’Ts when it comes to caring for succulents to ensure their happiness.

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Top Dressings

In your succulent pots, AVOID using moss. Although it is attractive, it retains moisture and fosters fungi and germs. Additionally, stay away from non-porous rocks like glass marbles, pea gravel, river rocks, fish rocks, sand, etc. As long as the soil has enough air to breathe, you can put a few rocks here and there as ornamentation.

USE TOP DRESSINGS THAT ALSO SERVE AS DRAINS. Shale, Turface, and pumice are my top choices. The Supplies page is a list of my shopping sources.

DO NOT utilize containers without drainage holes unless you only intend to use them for a short period of time. This applies to terrariums, jars, bowls, and mugs. And no, you cannot use them if you first fill them with soil and then place pebbles on the bottom. This fosters the growth of the bacteria that causes rot.

If there isn’t a hole in the bottom, drill it. If the container is non-porous or glazed, you should make enough holes with a ceramic or glass bit to allow the soil to dry out fast. Use a piece of screen, burlap, garlic net, or anything else that will keep the dirt in yet enable it to completely drain for larger holes.

Light

If your succulents aren’t used to full sun, DON’T expose them to it. Most people prefer part-sun over bright indirect sun. A succulent can be burned and killed when moved from partial to full sun.

Give your succulents as much light as they can handle, but do it gradually. Put your plant in a spot that receives a little more sun than it usually does, then move it over the course of a week or more to a brighter spot. Shelves, gardens, and windows facing north will all receive less light than those facing west. South receives a wonderful combination of east and west sun, while east-facing receives morning sun.

DON’T base the frequency of your irrigation on a schedule, but rather on how dry the soil surrounding the roots is. You could wish to repot in a different container with better draining soil if the soil doesn’t dry out within a week.

DON’T rule out using a smaller, more quickly drying pot. The best clay is unglazed and has drainage holes. Improve your soil by adding more drainage components than organic ones.

DO NOT use pre-bagged potting soil with additional fertilizer as it frequently lacks the proper nutritional balance for succulents and contains an excessive amount of organic material that causes the soil to dry out too rapidly.

DON’T use anything but ordinary topsoil and a ton of drainage materials. Brown organic dirt should be present in the same quantity or less than the other ingredients. On the Care Guide page is my formula for soil.

DON’T assume the soil your plant was grown in is the best soil for that kind of succulent. Before bringing any plants home, make sure to check them for fungus and pests. Avoid purchasing plants that were housed with ill or infected plants, as well as those that have been treated with neonicotinoids or other insecticides that are harmful to the environment.

DO check the plants you’ve picked and the surrounding plants for insects and fungus before taking them inside. If necessary, and especially if the soil was moist when you acquired it, repot your succulents in good soil. Take care not to expose them to more sun than they are used to. Start with some light exposure and progressively increase it over the course of a week or longer.

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What distinguishes succulent soil from potting soil?

Succulents need well-draining soil to be healthy. A succulent stores moisture in its leaves instead than the traditional potting soil, which is designed to hold water. In actuality, the cactus or succulent will develop root rot if the soil is excessively wet. So even though I’ve said it before, it bears reiterating that drainage holes must be safeguarded from clogging in succulent plant containers with holes in the bottom (see the full post on how to pot succulents here for more details). Of course, the following step is to select the kind of soil that will allow the water to drain.

I’ve bought and used this palm and cactus mix, which is also priced a little higher on Amazon, and it does appear to work well for succulents—but 8 qts can go rather quickly! I’ve started making my own succulent potting mix as a consequence using just three basic materials (get the printable version at the bottom of the post). What you’ll need to prepare the ideal soil for succulents in pots is listed below:

When purchasing succulents, should you repot them?

Do you repot your plant after purchasing it from the store, or do you leave it in the same pot indefinitely? In fact, repotting your newly acquired plants as soon as you can is a smart idea.

Why repeating is a wise concept is as follows:

  • Put that plant in a well-draining potting mix made for succulents and cacti. Succulents and cacti shouldn’t grow in potting soil that retains too much water, which happens to be the case frequently. The plants’ long-term health will be ensured by removing them from the nursery soil and placing them in a more suitable one.
  • When repotting, you can give the plant a closer look to check on its health. To determine whether the plant’s root system is healthy, you can inspect it. If necessary, you can also remove any dead or decaying roots. Dead or dried leaves can also be removed.
  • You can also look inside the plant for insects and pests that might be there and could contaminate your other plants if ignored. To prevent the infestation from spreading to your other plants, treat and isolate the plant as soon as you notice pests there.
  • You can select a better pot or planter. Choosing a pot or container to house the plants in is one of the things I enjoy most about repotting. A container that is a few inches larger than the nursery pot it was originally planted in is ideal so that the plant has space to grow but is not so large that you run the risk of the plant spending too much time in moist soil. It’s acceptable for some folks to reuse the same nursery pot, but you can also get creative with your selections.