How To Water Indoor Succulent Plants

Succulents respond best to the “soak and dry approach” of watering. Fully soak the soil, then let it dry completely before watering it once more. Additionally, make sure the succulents are in a container with a drainage hole and well-draining soil (more on that in a minute).

Pretty basic, yes? Watch this technique in action:

In general, it is better if water doesn’t reach the leaves of indoor succulents. It can decay if left on a leaf for an extended period of time.

Use a squeeze bottle or a tiny watering can with a nozzle (this one is great) (like the one in this super handy tool kit).

For outdoor succulents, where there is more breeze and the water will dry off more quickly, this is less of a problem.

If at all feasible, simply saturate the soil around your succulents with water. UNTIL the dirt has completely dried from the top of the pot to the bottom, DO NOT water your succulents again.

How frequently should indoor succulents be watered?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

The amount of water a succulent plant needs is unknown.

Despite the fact that succulents are among the easiest plants to care for, many people are unaware of how much water they actually require. Succulents have evolved in a way that makes it possible for them to store water for a lot longer than conventional houseplants since they naturally grow in locations with little rain (think desert or near-desert conditions). They cannot be irrigated in the same manner as a result. It is advised to allow the soil entirely dry out in between waterings before soaking it the next time. Your indoor succulents will often need watering once every two weeks as a result of this technique. However, depending on the specific succulent and your climate, you might need to change the interval between waterings.

You should make sure your succulents are planted in a container with sufficient drainage in addition to giving them the appropriate amount of water. Succulents are extremely vulnerable to root rot because of how well they store water in their thick leaves. You run the risk of the succulent drowning or rotting if the soil can’t drain correctly, either because it’s too compacted or the pot doesn’t have enough drainage. Leaving water on the leaves for an extended period of time might also cause them to decay. Therefore, use caution and precision when watering.

Is misting or watering succulents preferable?

When I first learned about succulents, I was fascinated by the notion that they couldn’t die. They were frequently referred to as very low maintenance plants that adored being neglected. That sounds fairly simple, hmm.

To add to my bewilderment, I frequently heard the word “succulent” used in the same sentence as the word “cactus.” We won’t get into it here because there is a really fantastic essay on this site that explains the link between cacti and succulents, but a widespread misconception regarding cacti is that they never require water. Because I believed succulents required little to no water, I occasionally misted them rather than watering them. They love to be ignored, right? They require little upkeep, right? Well, I hate to ruin the surprise, but my succulents barely made it through this abuse.

The scoop about misting and watering is as follows:

*Water: After the dirt has dried, drown your succulents in water. Put them in water until the bottom of the pot is filled with water. If you have a catch pan, remove any water that has accumulated there. The best kind of pots are unglazed, porous ones with drainage holes (think terracotta pots). Your succulents will appreciate that they allow them to breathe.

*Low Maintenance: Succulents grow in nature with shallow roots that quickly absorb water and store it in their leaves, stems, and roots for periods of drought. Succulents are considered low maintenance because of this. They are designed to hold water for extended periods of time, so you don’t need to water them as frequently as some plants, like every other day. They won’t wither and die while you’re away, so you may travel with confidence. Just remember to give them a good drink when you do water them!

*Water Type: Rainwater or distilled water are the ideal water types to utilize. Numerous minerals in tap water can accumulate in the soil and even appear on plant leaves.

*Watering Frequency: A number of factors determine how frequently you water (climate, season, humidity, pot size, pot type, drainage etc). The best general rule is to wait until the soil has dried before watering it again. The roots may decay if the soil isn’t given a chance to dry up or if water is left in the catch pan. You can stick your finger into the ground and feel around to determine the amount of moisture in the soil, or you can use a moisture meter (commonly sold in gardening centers or online and relatively inexpensive).

Leave the misting to the babies, please! Actually, fully developed succulents dislike being misted. Because they prefer dry environments, misting them will alter the humidity in the area around the plant. Additionally, this might cause decay. To gently hydrate your propagation babies’ tiny, sensitive roots, spray them.

If my succulent lacks water, how can I tell?

Succulents are better off dry than wet, but that doesn’t mean you can ignore the need to water them. In fact, the plant needs water to survive, and much like people, it will exhibit dehydration symptoms. Your succulent clearly needs more water if its leaves are wrinkled and shriveled.

The cells attempt to bring in more water to make up for the water that has been lost as they release their stored moisture to the rest of the plant. The cells shrink as they run out of water and the plant is forced to rely on its limited reserves, which causes the once-firm and full leaves to collapse and shrivel.

Can I water mist my succulents?

Soak the soil around your succulents in water until the drainage holes are full. (Use less water if your container lacks drainage holes.) Don’t water your succulents using a spray bottle. Brittle roots and moldy leaves can result from misting. Additionally, you can submerge pots in a pan of water and let the water drain out the drainage hole. Remove from the pan as soon as the soil’s top is damp.

Is it possible to hydrate succulents with ice cubes?

One of the most enjoyable pastimes you can engage in is caring for plants. They will not only give you many advantages, but they are also aesthetically beautiful. Simply ensure that you are aware of how to care for them.

Be mindful of the risks if you decide to attempt watering succulents with ice cubes. It’s conceivable that your plants will be harmed or killed if you subject them to such jarring temperature variations.

Any plant won’t like having its watered with ice cubes, succulent or not. To avoid stressing them out, it is preferable to use room temperature water. Additionally, you should plant plants in containers that encourage proper water drainage as well as good air circulation.

Without drainage, how much water should I give my succulents?

However, there are a few things that require extra consideration when it comes to watering succulents if you wish to grow them in pots without drainage holes.

Succulents should not be placed in pots without drainage holes since the water cannot escape. As a result, the roots may decay and the soil may become wet.

Knowing how much water to feed your succulents and how frequently is crucial for this reason.

How Much Water To Give Succulents In Pots Without Drainage Holes

Knowing how much water succulents require is essential if you plan to grow them in containers without drainage holes. The succulents may perish if they receive too little or too much water.

The soil should be watered well to a depth of about an inch, but not so thoroughly that water pools in the pot.

You can feed your succulents a little water at a time until about an inch of the pot is moist to gauge how much water to give them. Although too much water can cause it to collect in small pockets, you don’t need to saturate the soil.

To make sure you’re not giving your succulents too much or too little water, you can measure how much you’re giving them. To gauge how much water to give them, use a measuring cup or other device.

How Often To Water Succulents In Pots Without Drainage Holes

Knowing how frequently succulents require water is crucial when growing them in containers without drainage holes. If the soil is always moist, rot might develop and harm the plants.

Allowing the roots to partially dry out before providing additional water is essential when watering succulents without drainage holes. It’s crucial to avoid leaving the roots of succulent plants consistently damp for extended periods of time if you want to place them in pots without drainage holes.

Succulents in containers without drainage holes should ideally only receive water about every two weeks. Too much watering will cause the roots to rot and become damp, which can be fatal to the plant.

Before watering your succulents once more, you can test the soil with a moisture meter to see if it is dry.

If you don’t have a moisture meter, you can use your finger to feel how moist the soil is by pressing it into the pot; if only one inch of the pot feels damp, you should water it.

Watering Succulents In Pots Without Drainage Holes At The Right Time

When to water succulents in pots without drainage holes is another crucial consideration. Early in the day or late at night is the ideal time to water succulent plants.

Because their leaves dry up more quickly if they aren’t watered during the hottest part of the day, it is crucial to water succulents in the morning or the evening.

To avoid their leaves getting wet during the hottest part of the day, water succulents every two weeks in pots without drainage holes. You can water them in the morning or the evening.

How To Water Succulents In Pots Without Drainage Holes

How to water succulents in pots without drainage holes is another important consideration. While it’s crucial to avoid overwatering them, it can be difficult to provide them with enough water if there are no drain holes.

You can water your plants effectively while avoiding wet soil by using a number of techniques. Among them is a “pot that water itself.

Self-watering pots function by allowing water to collect at the bottom and gradually absorbing it through their porous sides. As a result, plants can receive enough water to last for several days or even weeks without needing to be watered again.

A watering can is an additional equipment that can be used to hydrate succulents in pots lacking drainage holes. In order to get water into the soil without having it pool on top of it, it is recommended to use a watering can with a narrow spout.

You may also employ a “Watering cans typically have a spout at the top; a watering wand has the spout at the end of a lengthy tube. By doing this, you may water succulents without wetting their leaves.

You can water them with a spray bottle if you don’t have one of these items. Just be cautious to avoid spraying the foliage and only the soil. Over-misting their leaves might make them decay.

What does a succulent look like when it is overwatered?

How can you tell if your succulent is getting too much water? You can usually determine if a succulent is being overwatered or underwatered by looking for telltale indications. A plant that has received too much water will have soft, mushy leaves.

The leaves would either turn translucent in color or appear lighter than they would on a healthy plant. A succulent that had received too much water would frequently lose leaves readily, even when only lightly handled. Usually, the lowest leaves are the ones to suffer first.

The plant will look to be unhealthy overall. When this occurs, the plant is either being overwatered, sitting in the incorrect soil that does not dry out quickly enough, or both.

Your plants are being overwatered if you have been giving them regular waterings or if you have been following a watering schedule regardless of how the plant appears.

On the other hand, a succulent that has been submerged will have withered, wrinkled, and deflated-looking leaves. The leaves will appear thin and flat. The entire plant will appear withered and dry.

The leaves of a good succulent plant should be thick and solid, not mushy or desiccated.

To learn more about this subject, visit my post titled “How To Tell If Your Succulent is Over or Under Watered,” in which I go into great length about how you may determine whether your succulent plant is being over or under watered.

This String of Pearls ‘Senecio Rowleyanus’ plant leaf is one that has been overwatered. If a succulent’s water storage capacity has been exceeded, it may physically burst from overwatering.