How To Transfer Succulents To Bigger Pot

  • Repot your succulents in well-draining potting soil—anything with “cactus” on the bag will do! Any nearby hardware or gardening store will have this. Here is an illustration of cactus dirt.
  • Pick a pot with a bottom drainage hole. Before adding the cactus soil, add a layer of rock if the pot of your dreams lacks drainage holes.
  • Fill your pot with cactus dirt about 3/4 of the way up.
  • To remove your succulent’s soil from its plastic container, gently squeeze the sides of the pot to release the soil.
  • Remove any remaining soil from your succulent’s roots by gently crumbling it.
  • After setting the succulent in its new pot, top out the pot with extra dirt to keep it in place.
  • Now is an excellent time to water your succulent if you haven’t in a while. If you’re unsure, give your succulent a week or so to adjust to its new environment before watering. Then, wait until the soil is fully dry before watering it once more (usually about two weeks).

How can I transfer my succulents to larger pots?

Begin by tilting the plant sideways and snatching it by the stem base. Shake the container a little after giving it a little tap on the bottom. The plant can also be removed from its previous pot by gently pulling on the stem after loosening the soil with a stick or your hands. Chopsticks can be used to further loosen the dirt if you are still unable to remove the succulent after doing so.

Instead, you can slowly hammer the old pot until it breaks. This would enable you to take the plant out of its old pot without damaging its root system, even though you would be sacrificing it.

After removing the succulents from the old pot, you should just brush the soil away from the roots or give them a light tap or tickle to loosen as much soil as you can. If you decide to wash the roots with water, be careful to allow them to dry for three to five days in a cool location out of the sun. If the roots of your succulents have grown too long, you can also clip them.

Fill the new pot with soil mixture by at least two-thirds before you plant your succulent. Once finished, carefully lay the succulent in the center and completely cover the roots with additional soil. To keep the succulent’s leaves from rotting, make sure they are entirely above the soil.

Place the succulent gently in the center and completely encircle the roots with additional soil.

If you want to repot a cactus, follow the same procedures as above. To prevent getting pricked by the thorns, just be sure to use a kitchen tong or wear gloves, such as gardening gloves, work gloves, or leather gloves, before you carry out the next tasks.

On the other side, repotting succulent arrangements is fairly challenging. However, to make things simpler, carefully remove each plant from its previous pot, taking care not to damage any of the roots. To accomplish this, make cuts through the soil and roots, then scrape off as much of the old dirt as you can from the roots. When you’re finished, carefully examine your succulents’ roots before putting them in their new pot. Make careful to leave any plants with damaged roots out of the pot for two to three days, or until the roots callus over, if you notice any.

When ought I to transfer my succulents to a larger container?

When your succulent has obviously outgrown its pot, it’s time to repot it. There won’t be any more room for the roots to spread when they begin to grow through the drainage hole in the pot. Repotter succulents in the early spring or early fall, just before their growing season begins. They will have sufficient time to recuperate from the repotting in this manner.

What is the ideal method for repotting a succulent?

1. To get started, fill your new planter 3/4 full with pre-mixed succulent or cactus soil, which is often available at any nearby nursery or home improvement store. You can combine standard potting soil and perlite in equal amounts to try making your own soil. Make sure the planter is at least 2″ wider than the diameter of the succulent if you are relocating it to a larger container. Your succulent will have plenty of room to expand and become stable as a result.

2. Remove the succulent from its present container and gently separate the roots. To loosen the roots and remove the soil, you can “tickle” them from the bottom. Consider this phase as a pleasant stretch for the roots. They can stabilize in a larger pot and acclimate to their new soil by being spread out and lengthened. This is the ideal time to remove any dead leaves and brush away any dead roots from the plant’s base. While doing this, be careful to brush away any old or extra dirt.

3. To support the plant, dig a small hole in the fresh dirt, lay the succulent in it, and then gently cover the roots with extra potting soil. Don’t cover any leaves or allow them lay on top of the soil; only add enough to cover the plant’s base. As a result of the leaves absorbing too much moisture from the soil, this will cause them to rot.

4. After the plant has stabilized, you can add colored rocks, pebbles, or sand to give your new succulent plant in a pot a unique touch. Make sure the material drains adequately if you do add something on top so that water can reach the soil underneath.

5. In this case, the situation dictates how to water. Depending on the type of plant and when it was last watered, a succulent that has been repotted may require different first watering. However, it is typically advised to hold off on watering your succulent for at least a week following repotting. Make sure the soil is dry before giving it a good soaking without drowning it.

6. Enjoy your succulent in a new pot! Depending on your environment, sunlight, etc., water your succulent once per week to three weeks to keep it healthy. Water should be applied when the soil is dry. Leave it alone until it dries if it is still wet. They are tough little plants, so try different things to see what works best for your new addition.

After purchasing, do I need to repot my succulents?

Do you repot your plant after purchasing it from the store, or do you leave it in the same pot indefinitely? In fact, repotting your newly acquired plants as soon as you can is a smart idea.

Why repeating is a wise concept is as follows:

  • Put that plant in a well-draining potting mix made for succulents and cacti. Succulents and cacti shouldn’t grow in potting soil that retains too much water, which happens to be the case frequently. The plants’ long-term health will be ensured by removing them from the nursery soil and placing them in a more suitable one.
  • When repotting, you can give the plant a closer look to check on its health. To determine whether the plant’s root system is healthy, you can inspect it. If necessary, you can also remove any dead or decaying roots. Dead or dried leaves can also be removed.
  • You can also look inside the plant for insects and pests that might be there and could contaminate your other plants if ignored. To prevent the infestation from spreading to your other plants, treat and isolate the plant as soon as you notice pests there.
  • You can select a better pot or planter. Choosing a pot or container to house the plants in is one of the things I enjoy most about repotting. A container that is a few inches larger than the nursery pot it was originally planted in is ideal so that the plant has space to grow but is not so large that you run the risk of the plant spending too much time in moist soil. It’s acceptable for some folks to reuse the same nursery pot, but you can also get creative with your selections.

Get To Know Your Succulents

Because some succulents, like Echeveria Vincent Catto, Sinocrassula Yunnannensis, or Echeveria Derenbergii, are inherently small and slow-growing, it is best to know what kind of succulents you are trying to grow bigger.

Search Google for the maximum size and growing advice for your succulent if you know its name. If you post a photo to one of the succulent-lovers’ facebook groups, they can identify your succulent if you don’t know its name.

To find a group on Facebook or Google and choose the one that looks appealing. There are some groups that can be excessively vast, and you might not always get a response because your message might get lost in the sea of thousands of other individuals trying to submit their queries. Sometimes working in smaller groups may be preferable.

If you don’t know the name of your succulent and don’t want to bother with Facebook, try searching Google for information about your plant’s qualities (blue succulent with pink edges or red spreading succulent etc.) Then, you can try to locate your plant by going to the image portion of the search.

Plant succulents in the garden

Succulent cuttings are one of our best-selling items at our online store. We have huge succulent gardens and beds since here is where succulents grow the best, quickest, and biggest. This allows us to grow enough to meet demand.

The majority of succulents are not frost hardy and would perish if planted in the ground in various regions of the world where winters are cold with frequent frosts. But don’t worry—we also have a remedy for you unfortunate residents of chilly climates.

However, in temperate conditions, succulents will make the most of the room they have when planted in the ground and will develop into magnificent, large plants.

Succulents can rot if planted in the area of the garden where water collects after heavy rains, therefore water needs to drain away successfully for them to grow in the ground.

Succulents that prefer the sun should be planted there, while those that prefer the shade should be planted behind trees or in the shade.

Although we do advise adding high-quality potting mix for additional drainage and nutrients, the majority of succulents will grow big and healthy even in poorer soil when planted in the ground.

Upgrade the pot regularly

Larger succulents will grow if there is more room for their roots. Although, as was already noted, certain species of succulents are naturally small and slow-growing, there isn’t much that can be done to encourage them to grow larger.

Most of our succulent plants are propagated through cuttings that are placed in little pots or propagation trays. We transplant the plant to a pot that is twice or three times the size of the root ball once the pot is full with roots.

They will do better in nice, fresh potting mix every time they are repotted, and we also get to observe how the roots are doing and check for pests on roots (mealy bugs, grubs, etc.) every time we repotted a plant, which is why we don’t place them in the biggest pot available at the beginning.

Since potting soil can degrade over time and harbor pests and fungus, it is recommended to gradually transition succulents to larger pots if you want them to grow big and healthy.

Succulents will technically continue to grow in a small pot after they have hit their limit and become root-bound, but they will do so extremely slowly.

On the bright side, if you choose the proper succulent for the job, you may achieve better color and a plumper form because many succulents may become “bonsai” if kept in small pots for an extended period of time; however, this is a subject for a completely separate post.

Succulents, do they outgrow their pots?

Regular pruning of succulents can help keep them from rotting, promote new growth, and prolong their healthy lives. Find out here when and how to prune your succulents!

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Although it might seem obvious, people are frequently taken aback when their densely planted succulent arrangement starts to seem unkempt. Although they tend to grow slowly, succulents eventually outgrow their containers and may even require frequent upkeep.

There are a few things that will make the process of pruning and caring for succulents considerably easier. Stay to the very end so you can learn about my “secret weapon to make an arrangement appear new again.”

Your succulent arrangements can benefit from a little sprucing up in the spring and fall. I strongly advise cleaning up and pruning in the spring.

But I’ve discovered that in the fall, it’s important to keep your plans as intact as you can. Even while you should still tidy up, get rid of any debris, and dead leaves, spring is often the best time to transplant, behead, and propagate.

Don’t worry if you don’t understand what some of stuff implies. In this post, I’ll show you everything.

My succulent died after being replanted; why?

Transplant shock is the cause of your succulent’s death after being replanted. The stress of a new environment can cause succulents to droop, turn yellow, brown, or black, and eventually die back when they are repotted because of the contrast in the soil medium, moisture levels, and lighting conditions.

Succulents are adaptive and develop adapted to a certain set of conditions, so when they are unexpectedly repotted or relocated to a different location, they frequently show indications of stress.