How To Tend Succulents

Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

How frequently should a succulent be watered?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

Are succulents sun or shade creatures?

Succulents generally require at least 4-6 hours of sunshine each day to thrive. They enjoy being in places that are sunny and bright. Lack of sunshine will cause difficulties in succulents such elongation or etiolation, when the plants extend for more light. Weak stems and low growth are the results of this procedure. Lack of light causes succulents to lose their bright coloring and turn pale or back to a drab green tone. Plants that receive enough sunshine will display their whole spectrum of brilliant hues, showing their genuine beauty.

If my succulent lacks water, how can I tell?

Succulents are better off dry than wet, but that doesn’t mean you can ignore the need to water them. In fact, the plant needs water to survive, and much like people, it will exhibit dehydration symptoms. Your succulent clearly needs extra water if its leaves are wrinkled and shriveled.

The cells attempt to bring in more water to make up for the water that has been lost as they release their stored moisture to the rest of the plant. The cells shrink as they run out of water and the plant is forced to rely on its limited reserves, which causes the once-firm and full leaves to collapse and shrivel.

How should I arrange succulents?

Succulents thrive in hot, arid conditions and don’t mind a little neglect due to their unique capacity to store water. They are therefore ideally suited to growing indoors and are the perfect choice for anyone looking for low-maintenance houseplants. Follow these instructions for successful plant care if you’re choosing succulents for the first time.

Select a succulent that will thrive in your indoor environment.

The majority of succulents need direct sunshine, however if your home only has a shady area, choose low light-tolerant plants like mother-in-tongue. law’s A trailing variety, like string of bananas, is an excellent option if you intend to grow your succulent in a hanging planter. To learn about your succulents’ requirements for sunlight, size, and spread, always read the plant labels.

Give the plants a good draining potting material.

You should repot your succulent as soon as you get it home since nurseries always plant their succulents in soil that is overly rich and holds too much moisture. A coarse potting mix with sufficient drainage and aeration is a good place to start. You can use an African violet mix or unique cactus and succulent mixtures that you can purchase at the nursery. Add perlite or pumice to the cactus or African violet mix (up to 50% of the total potting mix, depending on your particular succulent’s moisture requirements) to further increase drainage and prevent compaction. To make sure the mixture is moist throughout, always moisten it before using.

Decide on a container.

When repotting, use a container that is at least 1 to 2 inches bigger than the nursery container and has a drainage hole. Avoid using glass containers (such mason jars or terrariums) for long-term potting since they prevent roots from breathing and over time may result in root rot. Place your plant inside the container and backfill with extra pre-moistened potting mix after filling the bottom one-third of the container with pre-moistened potting mix.

Put the succulent plant in a pot somewhere sunny.

Try to arrange your succulents close to a south or east-facing window because most succulents need at least six hours of sun each day. Insufficient sunlight may cause your succulents to become spindly or to extend toward the light.

Between waterings, allow the potting mix to dry out.

Overwatering succulents is the most common error people make with them. Watering more deeply but less frequently is preferable. Before the next watering, completely saturate the potting mix (while making sure the water drains out of the drainage hole properly). The plant can finally perish if the potting soil is left moist every day.

Succulents should be fertilized at least once a year.

Fertilizer works best for plants in the spring (when the days lengthen and new growth starts) and again in the late summer. Use a water-soluble, balanced fertilizer (such as 8-8-8 or 10-10-10) that has been diluted to half the strength indicated on the container. Since succulents are semi-dormant in the winter, there is no need to nourish them. Because they are not actively growing, they do not require the nutrient boost.

How can I make my succulent plants happy?

Succulents may not need much attention, but they do need a few essentials to survive:

  • 1. Provide plenty sunlight. Succulents require adequate light—at least six hours each day of direct sunlight. Maintaining succulents outside can be quite simple. However, if you have a succulent indoors, you must keep it in direct sunlight near a window. A plant that is slanting toward the light is not receiving enough sunlight, yet a plant with burnt areas on its leaves is receiving too much direct sunshine.
  • 2. Use proper water. Depending on the season, succulents might have different water needs. Succulents should be irrigated if their soil dries completely during the growing season, but excess water should be avoided. When a succulent’s roots have time to dry out in between waterings, its lifespan is increased. In the chilly winter months, succulent plants go dormant and require less water. Only water your succulent as often as necessary because overwatering the soil is one of the main reasons of most development problems.
  • 3. Use the proper soil and pot combination. The appropriate container and potting soil can make all the difference, whether you’re growing your own succulents or purchasing one from a nursery. Your succulent planter needs to include a drainage hole if it is going to be an outdoor succulent. Proper drainage allows moisture to escape, allowing the soil and root systems to dry and prevent rot. Use well-draining soil instead of standard dirt if you have an indoor succulent. It is coarser than regular soil, enabling more air to pass through and encouraging evaporation rather than requiring to be drained. To increase aeration, perlite and pumice can be added to some potting mixtures.
  • 4.Remember to fertilize. The periodic fertilizing is beneficial for even low maintenance desert plants. To give your succulents a boost, use a diluted, water-soluble all-purpose fertilizer a couple times a year. Although it’s not entirely required, if you notice that your soil needs some help, add a little fertilizer.
  • 5. Examine your plant life. Pest hazards are more likely to affect a succulent indoors than outside. Make sure your plants are periodically checked for gnats or mealy pests. These insects are a sign that your plants are receiving too much water or fertilizer. Mealy bugs can lay hundreds of eggs and consume the plant juices that serve as their host, gradually harming your plant. Rubbish alcohol can be sprayed on your succulent’s leaves or soil to effectively kill mealy bugs and their eggs. Check the leaves and soil of the succulent before bringing it home from the nursery to make sure no bugs are present.

Succulents can they survive indoors without sunlight?

The most light is reflected from south-facing windows throughout the day in the northern hemisphere. The sun shines through windows facing east in the morning and west in the afternoon and evening. The least quantity of sunlight enters windows that face north.

A south-facing window is the best choice for the majority of sun-loving succulent plants in the northern hemisphere. However, all of the low-light succulents covered in this article happily flourish in windows that face west or east. Even in a dark, north-facing window, some of them will make it, but I don’t advise it because even there, they won’t thrive.

However, no succulent can live in a completely dark environment. Therefore, even if your succulent plants are varieties that thrive in low light, think about buying a tiny desktop grow light if you live in a basement flat, have only a north-facing window, or if your space has no windows at all. When a modest grow lamp is placed over low light succulents for 6 to 8 hours a day, you’ll be astounded at how well they grow. You won’t need to remember to turn the lights on and off every day if you have a reliable timer.

Now that you are aware of how much sunlight low light succulents require, allow me to introduce you to some of the greatest low light succulents.

Why are my cacti dying?

Overwatering and poorly draining soils are the main causes of succulent deaths. Succulents need the soil to dry out between waterings because they are drought-tolerant plants. Succulents get root rot in wet soil, which turns their leaves brown, black, or yellow and gives them a withering appearance.

While overwatering is the most frequent cause of dying succulents, there are several other potential causes as well:

Succulent plants typically die back when they are kept in environments that are drastically different from their native habitat.

Replicating some of the minimal rainfall, full or partial sun exposure, and stony, well-draining soil conditions will help revive dying succulents.

Best Rocks For Your Succulent Garden

Nationwide, a mania for succulents is spreading. Beautiful images of these plants may have started to dominate the Instagram feeds of local interior designers and gardeners. A remarkable group of plants known as succulents hold water in their stems or leaves. They provide an infinite range of eye-catching colors, shapes, and textures.

Succulents’ exceptional appeal is also due to the fact that they require very little care and irrigation. Succulents may flourish in practically any setting, and maintaining them doesn’t need much work. They are hence the ideal low-maintenance plant for the busy or forgetful gardener. You can sit back, unwind, and enjoy your low care landscaping after the initial planning and planting.

Succulents appear stunning on their own, but they look even more beautiful when they are surrounded by or combined with natural stone. Stone can visually enhance plants or act as a groundcover to protect them, especially in outdoor gardens. Succulents and rocks go together like bread and butter.

Now, we don’t just mean a rock you could find by the side of the road when we say “rocks for your succulent garden.” With a variety of sizes, shapes, and hues accessible for decorative uses, natural stone is an universe unto itself. For instance, boulders are large rocks that typically measure at least one foot in diameter. Stone that has been broken into angular bits and separated based on size makes up crushed rock. The term “rumble” describes larger bits of crushed rock. Pebbles and cobbles are round, smooth stones. These are just a few examples of the natural stone items that go well with succulents.

So, what are the best rocks for your succulent garden?

We spoke with two of our favorite (and neighborhood) gardening experts to find the answer to this issue. Here is our selection of the best rocks and natural stone items to complement your succulent garden:

Succulents—can they survive indoors?

Consider succulents if you desire for indoor greenery but have had trouble growing houseplants. They make pleasant house visitors and can easily endure interior circumstances.

They have unique characteristics that help them thrive in dry indoor conditions.

expanded roots, thick stems, or fleshy leaves that enable plants to store water. Cacti, which are a kind of succulent, are well known to the majority of people. But a variety of other plants grown primarily for their eye-catching foliage also belong to the succulent family.

Succulents have remarkable textures and strong, angular leaf shapes that make them become living sculptures for interior spaces. They are excellent indoor plants since they can thrive in dry environments. Many houseplants do not thrive because dwellings, especially in the winter, provide their inhabitants with dry interior air. A houseplant’s enemy is low relative humidity. However, because they can store water, succulents can withstand dry air without suffering unpleasant consequences.

Learn how to take care of succulents inside and how to grow these low-maintenance plants.

Do succulents proliferate?

Many indoor gardeners like the group of plants known as succulents. Cacti and succulents are both members of the succulent family. They have the benefit of growing gradually, requiring little maintenance, and not quickly outgrowing their surroundings. They are straightforward plants that require direct sunlight, soil that drains well, and very little, if any, fertilizer. The ideal soil is sandy. Cactus mixes that are sandy with a little gravel can be bought. It’s not required to use a lot of organic material. There is sporadic watering. When you consider where these plants originally came from, a hot, dry climate with arid soils and little to no rainfall gives you an idea of what to expect from them.

There are various methods for propagating succulents. They rarely blossom and then generate seeds that will germinate. The typical method is known as vegetative propagation. In essence, the original plant is being replicated.

Division or separation

While certain cacti will have baby plants grow along the ribs or leaf margins of the plant, most succulents grow by division. The plantlets can be removed once they are large enough to be handled without difficulty. (For further information on callusing due to the wound that results from their separation, see the section below.)

And other succulents are divided, when the parent plant is mature, new plants sprout all around it. The container eventually fills up as more tiny plants emerge and encircle the larger surrounding ones. Small plants can be gently removed from the pot along with the plant and soil. Before removing the plant from the container, give it a good drink so that more soil will cling to the roots. The little plants can’t grow until they have roots. It could take a while for roots to form if they don’t already have any. Put the young plants in pots. See the instructions on callusing below if the tiny plants are broken off or lack roots.

Cuttings and callusing

By taking cuttings from the parent plant, a few succulents can be multiplied. Sometimes it’s due to a damaged plant or an elbow that was misplaced that caused an unceremonious freefall to the ground. Sadly, the damaged area won’t heal and grow again, however the damaged area can be used to create a new plant. The fact that the shattered piece cannot be repaired right away is crucial. It requires some time for it to “callus” or dry out.

The freshly cut piece will perish if it comes into contact with wet soil. For large portions, Michigan State University Extension advises letting the cuttings lie for a few days or more. The moist, damaged region eventually develops a rough skin or callus over the tissue. You can bury the callused plant section in slightly moist soil. Insert the piece very briefly. It won’t grow if it is set in too deep. The small plant might need to be supported by having it lean against the side of the container, on a craft stick, or tongue depressor. Succulents frequently take many months to develop roots. Small plants shouldn’t be placed near or on a cold window sill because the roots will take longer to develop. After callusing, a full-grown leaf or branch that is broken off a succulent plant like a Haworthia or a Euphorbia may begin to take root. It won’t, though, if the Aloe vera leaf is broken off.

One size or one guideline does not apply to all succulents because there are so many variations. When learning about plants, smart gardeners are always coming to this realization. Bring a succulent indoors. They make charming and well-mannered house guests.