How To Take Care Of Different Succulents

  • Light intensity: full sun to some shade
  • Pets are welcome: Yes

One of the most well-known succulents is the hen and chick (Sempervivum tectorum), which is immediately recognised by its rosette patterns and vivid colour. Many plants can produce pink, red, or yellow star-shaped flowers under the correct circumstances, claims Randaci.

Randaci advises cutting an offset (the baby chick of the mother hen plant) from the main stem, known as the stolon, as soon as you notice roots on the new offset, in order to propagate this plant. Use the same potting soil you used for the mother plant to plant this new cutting.

Do various succulents require different maintenance?

All succulents require relatively comparable maintenance. However, some plants may require a little bit more water or sunlight than others at certain periods.

More than 180 different varieties of succulents are listed here, along with details on how to take care of each one.

To store this knowledge to your phone or print it out for later use, you can also buy our set of digital succulent reference cards!

Get our FREE watering cheat sheet as well so you can learn how to determine whether your succulents are receiving too much or too little water.

How are different succulents cared for?

9 Plant-Care Tips on How to Take Care of Succulents (And Not Kill Them)

  • Ensure That Your Succulents Receive Enough Light.
  • Repeatedly rotate your succulents.
  • Depending on the Season, Drink Water.
  • Directly water the soil.
  • Keep your succulents tidy.
  • Pick a container with a drainage system.
  • In the proper soil, grow succulents.
  • Eliminate bugs.

Succulent IdentificationWhy It Matters

When you adore succulents, it becomes crucial to know their names at some time. The correct identification of succulents, as I have discussed before, can actually mean the difference between life and death! Despite having quite diverse traits, many varieties of succulents may have the same common name or a comparable look. Their ability to weather the winter makes a difference sometimes. A misidentification of a succulent could result in plants that have died from the cold. Some succulents, though, are poisonous to kids and dogs. Pets and young children can safely consume Sedum morganianum, however Euphorbia myrsinites is extremely hazardous. To protect your family and plants, take care to understand how to identify the types of succulents you have.

Recognizing Different Types of Succulents

A succulent plant is any plant that holds water in its leaves, stems, or roots. The appearances of many types vary greatly from one another. Succulent varieties can, however, seem quite alike. Two genera that are frequently mistaken for one another are Echeveria and Sempervivum. Hens and chicks is the popular name for both. Each plant forms a substantial rosette, giving them a similar appearance. They replicate similarly, each creating offsets. The young succulents that emerge at the base and spread out next to the main rosette are known as succulent offsets. But while the other perishes with just one freeze, the first survives at temperatures much below zero.

You will eventually be able to identify more varieties of succulents solely by appearance. Even if you are now unable to distinguish between a Sempervivum and an Echeveria, if you keep looking and looking for the differences, eventually you will be able to. Sounds strange, I realise. However, just as you are aware of your own child, even when they are surrounded by other children, Or perhaps you are only familiar with your own cat. One skill we all have is the ability to notice subtle differences. Simply said, we employ this expertise in a variety of ways. Perhaps you can identify the differences between 1960s muscle vehicles. I can distinguish between wolves and coyotes. Some people can easily tell a Cabernet from a different vintage apart, or they can recognise different bird species by their cries. Succulent identification only requires practise.

In the image above, there is one obvious difference between Sempervivum and Echeveria. Do you see how the sempervivum’s leaf border is covered in a plethora of tiny hairs? Those hairs are ciliates. A ring of minute hairs called ciliate (SILL-ee-uht) hairs extends along the… They gather dew for the plant in its desert environment. Sempervivum has few echeveriado, but these ciliate hairs. Most likely, your plant is not an Echeveria if the margins are covered in microscopic hairs. (The leaves of fuzzy echeveria are covered in fine hairs.)

Identifying SucculentsNote Characteristics

Another frequent query in identifying succulents is how to differentiate between Aeonium and Echeveria. Additionally, certain Aeonium feature ciliate hairs. The stems of Aeonium and Echeveria, however, are another difference. Echeveria rosettes generally develop close to the soil surface, like Sempervivum. However, aeonium develops long, branching, woody stems with rosettes at each terminal.

Look for the details to tell apart various succulent varieties. As we’ve seen, some types have smooth leaves while others have ciliate hairs along the leaf margins. Observe the leaf thickness as well. The leaves of Echeveria are generally thicker than those of Sempervivum or Aeonium, but not as thick as those of Graptopetalum. Here are a few plant traits to consider when determining whether a plant is a succulent:

Can different succulents be planted together?

Recently, I’ve received several inquiries from folks wondering how much room should exist between the succulents in their arrangement. The reply is, “It depends.” Succulents are perfectly capable of being planted quite near to one another.

Succulents grow more slowly when planted closely together, helping the arrangement to better maintain its original layout. When they are close together, watering them can be more difficult. But this is a really fantastic approach to plant your succulents, particularly if you’re creating the arrangement as a present or for an event.

A nice illustration of succulents that are firmly packed together is this clam shell planter at Waterwise Botanicals.

Succulents are generally slow growers, but if you give them a bit extra room to spread out, they’ll grow a little faster and eventually fill the space. If you want your plants to grow larger or reproduce more readily on their own, this is a fantastic alternative. I suggest using this slightly dispersed strategy if you are just getting started with succulents.

It is simpler to water the succulents correctly when there is room between the plants. The soil will dry up more quickly due to the improved air flow. We are aware that succulents thrive in rapidly draining soil!

Remember that you don’t want the succulents to be too close together or in a pot that is much bigger than they are.

Succulents will prioritise generating roots over growing larger if they are given too much room. A good distance between plants, in my opinion, is between 1/2 and 1.

Best Rocks For Your Succulent Garden

Nationwide, a mania for succulents is spreading. Beautiful images of these plants may have started to dominate the Instagram feeds of local interior designers and gardeners. A remarkable group of plants known as succulents hold water in their stems or leaves. They provide an infinite range of eye-catching colours, shapes, and textures.

Succulents’ exceptional appeal is also due to the fact that they require very little care and irrigation. Succulents may flourish in practically any setting, and maintaining them doesn’t need much work. They are hence the ideal low-maintenance plant for the busy or forgetful gardener. You can sit back, unwind, and enjoy your low care landscaping after the initial planning and planting.

Succulents appear stunning on their own, but they look even more beautiful when they are surrounded by or combined with natural stone. Stone can visually enhance plants or act as a groundcover to protect them, especially in outdoor gardens. Succulents and rocks go together like bread and butter.

Now, we don’t just mean a rock you could find by the side of the road when we say “rocks for your succulent garden.” With a variety of sizes, shapes, and hues accessible for decorative uses, natural stone is a universe unto itself. For instance, boulders are large rocks that typically measure at least one foot in diameter. Stone that has been broken into angular bits and separated based on size makes up crushed rock. The term “rumble” describes larger bits of crushed rock. Pebbles and cobbles are round, smooth stones. These are just a few examples of the natural stone items that go well with succulents.

So, what are the best rocks for your succulent garden?

We spoke with two of our favourite (and neighbourhood) gardening experts to find the answer to this issue. Here is our selection of the best rocks and natural stone items to complement your succulent garden:

Do indoor succulents require direct sunlight?

It might be challenging for succulents to receive adequate sunlight inside. They typically require 6 hours each day of bright, indirect sunshine outside.

However, indoors, you should put your succulents close to a window that receives light throughout the day. Place your succulents close to the brightest window or area of your house or office if this is not an option.

Watch this video to learn more:

Are succulents sun-loving creatures?

Succulents generally require at least 4-6 hours of sunshine each day to thrive. They enjoy being in places that are sunny and bright. Lack of sunshine will cause difficulties in succulents such elongation or etiolation, when the plants extend for more light. Weak stems and low growth are the results of this procedure. Lack of light causes succulents to lose their bright colouring and turn pale or back to a drab green tone. Plants that receive enough sunshine will display their whole spectrum of brilliant hues, showing their genuine beauty.

Succulents can they survive indoors without sunlight?

The most light is reflected from south-facing windows throughout the day in the northern hemisphere. The sun shines through windows facing east in the morning and west in the afternoon and evening. The least quantity of sunlight enters windows that face north.

A south-facing window is the best choice for the majority of sun-loving succulent plants in the northern hemisphere. However, all of the low-light succulents covered in this article happily flourish in windows that face west or east. Even in a dark, north-facing window, some of them will make it, but I don’t advise it because even there, they won’t thrive.

However, no succulent can live in a completely dark environment. Therefore, even if your succulent plants are varieties that thrive in low light, think about buying a tiny desktop grow light if you live in a basement flat, have only a north-facing window, or if your space has no windows at all. When a modest grow lamp is placed over low light succulents for 6 to 8 hours a day, you’ll be astounded at how well they grow. You won’t need to remember to turn the lights on and off every day if you have a reliable timer.

Now that you are aware of how much sunlight low light succulents require, allow me to introduce you to some of the greatest low light succulents.

How frequently ought one to water succulents?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

Succulent or snake plant?

One of the simplest indoor plants to care for is the snake plant, often referred to as “Mother-in-Tongue” Law’s and Sansevieria. This succulent plant is ideal for beginners because it is highly tolerant. What you need to know about maintaining a snake plant at home!

About Snake Plants

Snake plants, which are indigenous to southern Africa, are well suited to climates that are comparable to those in the southern United States. As a result, in USDA zones 8 and warmer, they can be cultivated outdoors for a portion of the year. Snake plants should only be planted in restricted areas or in containers since they spread by putting out underground runners and may become invasive.

Only a very small number of conditions have the power to significantly harm this plant, including excessive water and cold temperatures. Root rot is brought on by wet soil, and foliage can be harmed by prolonged exposure to freezing weather.

How to Plant Snake Plants

  • Pick a pot with a bottom drainage hole. Since terra cotta pots let the soil to dry out more readily than plastic pots, they are ideal for growing snake plants.
  • Use a potting mix that drains effectively. The best potting soil is one made for “cacti and succulents,” as it will be less likely to become overly wet.
  • Avoid burying snake plants too deeply when repotting them. The plant needs to be buried the same depth as it was in its previous container.

Choosing a Location in the Home

  • Snake plants can handle some direct sunshine but prefer bright, indirect light. However, they also thrive in dark, shaded spaces and other low-light sections of the house, albeit more slowly.
  • Relocating your plant too quickly from low light to direct sunlight will shock it. Try to avoid doing this. When relocating plants, do so gradually. Over the course of about a week, gradually expose the plant to stronger and brighter light. In warmer, brighter places, plants will require more water, so be sure to alter your watering practises accordingly.
  • Keep the plant in an area that is warm (above 50°F) (10C). Make sure to shield it from draughty windows in the winter.

How to Care for Snake Plants

Overwatering is one of the most frequent issues with snake plants and other succulents. These plants frequently have root rot because they cannot tolerate wet soil well. Follow these watering guidelines to prevent this:

  • Avoid watering too often. Between waterings, allow the soil to mostly dry out.
  • Observe more than simply the appearance of the soil’s surface to determine when to water. Instead, carefully insert a wooden chopstick or your finger a few inches into the ground. Delay watering if you detect any wetness or if soil sticks to the chopstick.
  • If at all feasible, use the pot’s bottom water. This promotes deep, downward root growth, which helps to support the thick, towering leaves.
  • Water less frequently in the winter than in the spring and summer when the plant isn’t actively growing.
  • The broad, flat leaves are prone to dust accumulation; if necessary, wipe them clean with a moist cloth.
  • In ideal circumstances, snake plants grow quickly and may require dividing every year.
  • In the spring, split and replant. Remove a part with roots and leaves and put it in a pot with potting soil that drains properly.
  • A snake plant may occasionally flower if it is confined to a pot. On tall spikes, fragrant clusters of greenish-white flowers can be seen.
  • The most typical species of snake plant is Sansevieria trifasciata. It has tall, dark-green leaves with alternating bands of light grayish-green.
  • With “Bantel’s Sensation”
  • Up to three feet long, narrow leaves contain white vertical lines. Finding this kind can be challenging.
  • Sansevieria hannai
  • In “Bird’s Nest,”
  • A tight nest-like shape, resembling that of a bromeliad, is formed by short, broad, dark and light green leaves. Only 6 to 8 inches are grown on leaves. To thrive, this type does not require a lot of light.
  • The “Golden Hahnii”
  • Similar to the common “Bird’s Nest,” but with yellow-variegated leaf edges.
  • Cylindric Sansevieria:
  • called “Cylindrical Snake Plant”
  • This type of snake plant has cylindrical leaves that finish in a sharp point, as the name would imply.
  • called “Starfish Snake Plant”
  • The cylindrical leaves of the starfish snake plant fan out from its base, giving it the appearance of a starfish.
  • Masoniana Sansevieria
  • A “Whale Fin”
  • These fascinating snake plants have broad, huge leaves that mimic a whale breaching the surface of the water.
  • According to reports, peace lilies, spider plants, and snake plants are highly effective in purifying the air by removing toxins like formaldehyde. To fully understand the breadth of these plants’ air-purifying potential, however, more research is required!
  • A species of snake plant called Sansevieria trifasciata, which is indigenous to tropical Africa, produces a robust plant fibre that was originally utilised to construct hunting bow strings. It also goes by the term “Bowstring Hemp” because to this.
  • The most frequent problem is overwatering-induced root rot.
  • Remove any dead leaves and let the plant dry out more than usual if this happens. Snake plants are tough and usually bounce back. If the plant doesn’t improve, take it out of its container, throw away any rotten roots and leaves, and repot it in new soil.