How To Take Care Of Air Succulents

Your air plant will require routine watering. It’s a common fallacy that these plants can survive indoors or in gardens without irrigation. Water is essential unless your airplants are growing outside in a climate that closely resembles their natural home. There are several fundamental rules one may abide by to keep their Tillandsia happy, even though your particular environment and the species being grown have an impact on watering.

For indoor cultivation, we advise immersing your airplant for 6–12 hours once every 7–10 days. Make sure there are no soap or chemical residues in your soaking container that could harm your plant. Make sure your plant thoroughly dries in 4 hours after soaking. Place the plant in a well-lit area with good airflow, and be sure to shake off any extra water by turning the plant upside down. A little spritz from a water bottle or the steam from your shower is unlikely to satisfy your Tillandsia’s water needs for very long due to the dry air brought on by air conditioning and heat.

The following water qualities are preferred by tillandsia:

1) Rain

2) Refined

3) Allow tap water to stand for 15 minutes (for chlorine to dissipate)

4) Never use distilled water since it depletes nutrients through osmosis, which can kill your plant.

The amount of outside watering depends on your climate. While no irrigation may be needed in a damp, rainy environment, regular watering through spraying or soaking may be necessary in hot, dry conditions.

How often should air succulents be watered?

For the best care, your plants should be watered 2-3 times each week in addition to once every week. Every 2-3 weeks, a 2-hour bath should be taken. You will need to water or mist your plants more frequently if you live in a hotter, drier region. Your plant’s leaves will start to feel heavier and more wet after watering, and they will be softer and lighter in color when they require more water. Dehydration may be indicated by leaves that are wrinkled or rolled.

How Much Light Does an Air Plant Need?

Air plants require strong, indirect light to grow. Good possibilities are rooms with windows that face the south or east because the sun will shine brightly in these areas for the majority of the day. As long as the plant is put close to the window and the window is not covered by trees or an adjacent apartment building, rooms with North-facing windows also perform effectively. Western light typically arrives later in the day and has a tendency to be quite warm and powerful. Take care not to burn your air plant!

The air plant will generally withstand more light as the humidity level in your area increases. This means that you should plan to spritz your air plant more frequently, such as twice a week or even every day, if you’re placing it where it will get a lot of light. An air plant will thrive in a bright bathroom or bustling kitchen since the humidity from your shower or boiling water will take care of the majority of plant misting for you.

Air Plants and Artificial Light

A lot of customers ask us if they can put their air plant in a basement or office where there won’t be any windows for natural light. The answer is yes, but there are a few particular guidelines to follow to guarantee the success of your plant.

Fluorescent light must be full-spectrum. These plants can’t photosynthesize in the kind of light that regular incandescent bulbs produce. Place your Tillandsia no more than three feet from the source of light. Additionally, if you plan to use fluorescent lighting, the plants will require at least 12 hours every day.

We advise purchasing a dedicated bulb for your plant (such as a Gro-Lux, Repta-Sun, or Vita-Lite) and setting it on a 12-hour timer if you live in a basement or wish to keep an air plant in your office to ensure that it receives the proper amount of light to survive.

Sand, rocks, and dried wood arranged in a shallow dish make a wonderful air plant display.

How should an air succulent plant be cared for?

Your environment should be taken into account while deciding how to care for air plants. While we have provided a generic set of care instructions for air plants, it is essential that you take your environment into account when choosing things like watering technique and frequency. If you live in a dry region, you might need to water your plants more regularly or mist them every day in between soaks; however, if your air plants are in an area with high humidity levels, you could need to water them less frequently.

There are various Tillandsia species, each with its own own form, size, pattern of development, and requirements for maintenance. While most Tillandsia will benefit from some air plant care advice, it’s crucial to take the air plant itself into account. In general, plants with silvery leaves and those with more trichomes will thrive in more light and require a little less water, but plants with darker green leaves may need more water and may be more vulnerable to sun damage.

Light is one of the most essential things that all living organisms require, and air plants are no exception. You should place your indoor plants next to a suitable light source if you wish to maintain them there. This may be 3-5 feet from a window or next to a source of artificial light. Avoid exposing your air plants to too much direct sunlight because even indoors, it can be damaging. Make sure your plants are in a shaded spot away from direct sunlight if you are keeping them outside. Only a few kinds can withstand direct sunlight.

The indirect light and steam from a bathroom or kitchen window is perfect for air plants, and the moisture will keep them content.

If the plants aren’t too far from it and get enough of it each day, artificial light can also be a good source of energy.

The fact that air plants require less upkeep than many other house plants is one of their best qualities. The three essential factors that might affect their health and lifespan are air, water, and light. This does not, however, imply that they require no maintenance.

Are your air succulents watered?

It is preferable to soak your air plants in a bowl of water for 20 to an hour once per week to 10 days. Totally submerge the plant. Even though they are constantly wet in nature, if your plant is in bloom, you might want to keep the bud above the water to avoid disturbing it.

How can I tell whether my air plant is content?

Unique and hassle-free indoor plants, air plants (Tillandsia) add significant visual charm to your home. These unique plants come in a variety of sizes, have health benefits for your home during the photosynthesis process, and need very little upkeep from you, which appeals to busy professionals. How can you know whether your air plant is healthy considering that they require less maintenance than other plants?

Hydration of the plant is essential to avoid underwatering and determine the health of your air plant. To determine whether the plant is getting too much or not enough moisture, regularly look for discolored leaves or dry or wet rot. An air plant is in good health if it blooms and produces fluff.

There are numerous techniques to determine whether your air plant is healthy, and the majority of them only require a visual examination. They could quickly get ill by doing some unexpected activities. Continue reading to learn more about 11 quick ways to assess the general health of your air plant.

How long does an air plant live?

Perennial plants are tillandsias, also referred to as air plants. According to the source, they have a lifespan of between two and five years, which indicates that they normally survive longer than two years.

The type of air plant and the growing conditions have an impact on how long they live, though. They reside in deserts, on various surfaces, and on tree branches in their natural habitat (other surfaces they can grow on).

Air plants only experience one flowering during their existence, which marks the culmination of their development and maturity.

Depending on the species, the flowers might remain in bloom for a number of months. However, the air plant will begin to die when the blossoms start to wilt and fade. Air plants develop pups or offsets before they die to carry on the same growth cycle.

Despite the mother plant dying, you can take the pups out and raise them separately. Separating the pups from the mother is referred to as “division is a method of air plant propagation.

As an alternative, you might leave those puppies grouped together ” (also known as “tillandsia balls).

Where should my air plant be placed?

All air plants are native to tropical regions where freezing temperatures never occur. It’s crucial to keep them at a reasonable temperature without a sweater, right? typically from the 1960s or earlier. Keep them away from windows that are cold in the winter and air conditioner vents.

At least a few hours of bright, indirect sun each day are necessary for air plants to thrive. The optimal placement is between one and three feet from an east or west-facing window, or around two feet from a source of artificial light. They can be exposed to hotter, more direct sun for longer periods of time if you maintain them well-hydrated. Avoid areas that are poorly lit.

How come my air plant is dying?

More air plants perish from overwatering than from underwatering. The telltale indicator is when the bottom of your air plant appears brown and slimy. Instead of submerging or soaking your air plants, try misting them with a spray bottle. In between waterings, make sure your air plant has completely dried out. Only mist your air plants 1-3 times each week. Less can be more. It’s crucial to dry your air plant within four hours because they can become overwatered if they don’t. Get a fan for your air plant if it doesn’t dry after four hours of watering, and water it less the following time.

2. Insufficient air causes air plants to lack nutrients. It results in “dry rot.” There won’t be enough food if there isn’t enough air movement around air plants. Keep in mind that air plants consume nourishment. Terrariums and small, quiet locations like toilets shouldn’t be used to house air plants because there isn’t enough airflow in these areas. Instead, pick a place with lots of natural light and fresh air, such as close to an open window, in a large room with other rooms adjacent to it, in a courtyard or on a veranda. Lack of air flow can also lead to overwatering because it delays the air plants’ ability to fully dry up. The problem with air plant holders is dry rot. Your air plant may develop dry rot on the area of the plant that has poor air flow from the planter if the base is placed in a planter, such as a pot, hanger, or pouch, that has no ventilation. Before you notice the rot, it will have spread and your air plant will be dead.

3. Lack of Light – To produce their own nourishment, air plants require light. If your air plants are indoors, make sure they are one meter or less from a window. They’ll definitely perish from lack of sunshine if you put them in a dark hallway.

4. Too much direct sunlight will burn your plant or severely dry the foliage. Generally speaking, 45 minutes of moderate early morning or late afternoon direct sunshine is acceptable. However, it is advised to use filtered sunlight or total shade.

5. Frost – Because they are sensitive to the cold, air plants. They dislike temperatures below 0 degrees Celsius. If you live in a chilly climate, you might want to think about bringing your air plants inside during the winter.

6. Humidity – some types of air plants like it when the humidity is high. If the leaves of your air plant are too curled, the air may be too dry for the plant. Spraying or soaking air plants in water just isn’t enough moisture if the air is too dry. Consider soaking your air plant for 30 minutes each week in addition to your regular spraying if you believe it died from low humidity. or daily spray your plant. Additionally, you can put the air plant on a piece of driftwood or any object that can hold moisture. Another choice is to make a bed using a mixture of 50% perlite and 50% orchid potting mix. Spray the mixture every time you spray your plants. Your air plants might even drop roots into the mixture since they are so content.

7. Rust – Your air plant will develop dead areas as a result. Keep your plant away from anything that is rusty. Regular wire might rust in the future. For mounting air plants, use plastic-coated or galvanized wire.

8. Copper wire is well recognized for killing air plants. Copper is poisonous to air plants, particularly when it is regularly moist.

9. It’s typical for the mother air plant to pass away. Air plants develop, blossom, give birth to pups, and then go extinct. If your air plant has already bloomed and produced pups, it’s entirely possible that she is about to die. Don’t get rid of her just yet. Before she leaves, she might surprise you by bearing even another pup.

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How are air plants maintained?

Here are 5 easy guidelines to remember when taking care of tillandsia:

  • 1) Give your air plant regular waterings. Your air plant will require routine watering.
  • 2) Supply light to your air plant.
  • 3) Allow your air plant to breathe.
  • 4) Maintain a Pleasant Temperature for Your Air Plant.
  • 5) Don’t harm your airplant by doing this.

How frequently should I water my air plant?

I frequently receive queries concerning caring for air plants that are kept in glass globes because they have become so popular. To enjoy your plant in a glass enclosure for many years, follow these few instructions. If you’re seeking for glass globes, our shop has a wide variety of unusual patterns.

  • The more attention you can provide your plant, the bigger the globe.
  • When you initially get your plant, give it a 20 to 30-minute bath. Keep an eye on the size and color to determine how content the plant is. Consider this “image” constantly.
  • Before inserting your plant into the globe, let it almost entirely dry out.
  • Every 4-5 days, mist your plant with one spray for small globes, two or three sprays for globes 3-5 inches in diameter, and more if the plant is in a wide open globe. The objective is to estimate the drying time; the longer the plant can retain moisture, the smaller the globe and less circulation. Overwatering will cause the plant to perish.
  • Do you recall how your plant seemed after soaking? If it no longer has that cheerful, healthy appearance, remove it, soak it for 30 to 60 minutes, shake, and let it almost completely dry before replacing in the globe.
  • Place your globes away from windows or other areas where they will receive direct sunlight. Keep in mind that the glass will make the heat and sunlight more intense. Some plants may even grow in low to moderate light, though indirect light is preferred.