How To Start A Succulent From A Leaf

In the spring and summer, when leaves and stems are ready for active growth, it is simplest to propagate succulent leaves and cuttings. Most common succulents can be multiplied successfully from individual leaves or stem fragments.

  • For succulents with fleshy leaves, like jade plants or echeveria and sempervivum rosettes, leaf propagation works well. The leaf must remain intact for the root to take. To loosen the leaf, gently bounce it back and forth while holding it between your forefinger and thumb. After that, carefully separate the leaf from the parent plant, keeping the base in tact.
  • Succulents with distinct stems, including stacked crassulas and spreading or erect sedums, respond well to stem cuttings. Cutting succulents is analogous to propagating soft-stemmed plants. To cut stem tips, use a sharp knife, or take an entire stem to make many starts. Each cutting should be 2 to 3 inches long and have multiple leaves. Only the top two leaves should be kept.

Can you simply bury a succulent leaf in the ground?

Fill a shallow tray with succulent soil (I like to add in some perlite or pumice) and lay the callused leaves on top to propagate your succulent leaves directly in or on soil.

They can also be planted in the ground with the calloused end down. Simply put, this wouldn’t allow you to observe the roots develop.

Water infrequently or not at all until roots begin to grow. The leaves will almost always rot if there is too much water at this time.

I spray a small amount of water just in front of the leaves after placing them on top of the soil. Just enough moisture to make the roots feel comfortable.

When roots or young succulents begin to emerge, spray the leaf cuttings to hydrate the roots. Avoid getting the actual leaves wet. To prevent the roots from drying out, repeat this procedure every few days or so.

Succulent cuttings should be kept in strong light, but until the new plants are more established, direct sun should be avoided.

Transfer them now into their individual pots. Make sure not to overly damage the roots. Keep the young succulents above the dirt and merely cover the roots with soil.

Avoid plucking up the leaves repeatedly to inspect their roots! Although it’s tempting, try to restrain yourself. The young roots can be damaged and stressed out if they are disturbed. The roots will frequently wilt and shrivel up as a result.

How can you root succulents the quickest?

So, you may be wondering how to quickly propagate succulents. I can relate to both the joy and frustration of watching a new plant develop.

Since I’ve been growing succulents for a few years, allow me to give you some advice on how to quickly propagate your succulents as well as some alternative techniques you can try.

Stem cuttings are the simplest and quickest method of propagating succulents. If the plant is a fresh cutting from the mother plant, it will already have a strong foundation from which to build its new root system. Another instance is when you cut off the succulent’s top portion because it has been stretched out significantly (etiolation), this stem will likewise give rise to numerous new plantlings (pups). Due to its existing root system, the plant will also have a great possibility of producing more offset and growing quickly.

Always check that the stem cuttings are a respectable size for the plant’s typical size.

According to my experience, I always want to make sure that the succulent has a lot of nodes where the leaves attach to the stem and a lot of leaves in its stem. Once the succulent is put in soil, these stem nodes will form roots, and the leaves will serve as the succulent’s water source until its root system matures.

What is the time required to grow succulents from leaves?

  • Leaf propagation: Typically, it takes 2 weeks for roots to develop through leaf propagation. New leaves will start to form in around 8 weeks and can optionally be transplanted to a tiny container.
  • Root formation typically takes 4 weeks, but it can occasionally take longer with stem proliferation.
  • Offset propagation: Once the pups have developed a calloused skin, the roots typically begin to grow after 4 to 10 weeks.
  • The process of propagating seeds takes the longest—cactus seeds can take anything from three weeks to a year to even begin to germinate. After that, the seedling takes a very long period to mature into a full-grown adult.

Gather Your Succulents To Plant

For this video, we’ll be planting a variety of succulent species using both cuttings and discarded leaves. Amass the materials you want to plant. You can either utilize fallen leaves or cut cuttings from an established plant. If you can’t locate cuttings anywhere else, you can usually find them online and at most florists. Although these are also available on Amazon, I got mine from a vendor on Etsy.

Prepare your succulents for planting.

The most crucial step in this method is preparing your succulents. Make sure you have enough stem to plant in the ground so it can support the plant. Any excess leaves at the stem’s base should be removed. It’s good to leave approximately an inch of the stem exposed for larger cuttings, and you can use less for smaller cuttings.

After that, examine the base of your cutting. The plants ought to have a “callous” on them, which denotes that the plant’s base has dried out. You should wait a few days before planting freshly cut succulents because this forms a few days after the succulent is cut. By letting the cut end dry more quickly on a paper towel or paper bag, you can hasten this process.

Succulents are wonderful because you can also plant their leaves, so hold onto the ones you pulled off the stem. Verify your succulents for any bad components. Any area of the plant that is dark contains rot, which can spread to other areas and ultimately destroy the plant. Simply cutting it will allow you to get rid of the rotten parts.

Mix your soil.

If you aren’t using a pre-made succulent soil mix, you’ll need to prepare your soil so that it will drain effectively and support the growth of your succulent plants. To make the soil drain well, I combine one part potting soil with one part sand. In order to help larger plants become more firmly rooted in the ground, I also prefer to have a supply of tiny rocks nearby.

To fill a pot or tray, pour your soil mixture. I’m repurposing an old baking pan that I can’t bake in as a planting tray.

Plant!

We’ve reached the enjoyable part now! Make a little, inch-deep hole in the ground. After inserting your cutting, fill up the depression with soil.

Make careful to space your cuttings, if you’re planting more than one, roughly 2-3″ apart.

Ensure that your plants receive adequate water. Although succulents don’t often require much water, you may need to water them every 2-4 days while they are developing their roots, depending on how dry the soil becomes. It’s normal for the leaves to initially appear a little dried out because the plant is using its reserves of stored energy to develop new roots. New growth should begin to appear in around four weeks. Change to weekly watering or watering only when the soil is dry once the plants have set their roots and have started to grow.

Admire and Show Off Your Work!

Well done! Show off your incredible craftsmanship and green thumb to all of your friends! These plants will be prepared for repotting if you desire once they have developed roots and begun to grow, which should take around 3 to 6 weeks. They make wonderful Christmas gifts for friends and coworkers when planted in a tiny Mason jar or vibrant pot!

Can I replant a fallen succulent leaf?

Allow your succulent’s leaves to dry for three days after they have fallen off. This gets them ready for propagation, which is the procedure for developing new succulent plants from cuttings.

How is a leaf multiplied?

Include up to 112 inches of the petiole when removing a leaf. Place the petiole’s lower end within the medium (Figure 1). The base of the petiole will sprout one or more young plants. The original leaf-petiole cutting may be utilized again to grow more plants when the new plants are separated from it. African violet, peperomia, episcia, hoya, and sedum are a few examples of plants that can be grown using leaf-petiole cuttings.

What succulent is the most straightforward to grow?

Having a collection of succulents might be most gratifying when you propagate them. You can increase the number of a popular plant in your yard through propagation, swap plants with friends, and even preserve a dying plant. Here are our top ten picks for beginner-friendly succulents.

Sedum rubrotinctum (Pork and Beans or Jelly Beans)

Bright crimson in direct sunlight; green in shadow. This resilient Sedum quickly fills in container gardens and rock gardens. Remove the leaves and place yourself on a damp, well-draining surface.

Echeveria ‘Lola’

one of the most productive Echeveria leaf plants. Both newcomers and seasoned collectors adore the flawlessly round rosette and the pearly pink leaves. They germinate swiftly and successfully spread through leaves in large numbers.

Sedum nussbaumerianum

difficult in dry, warm areas with little water. Easy to grow from leaf or tip cuttings. Before planting in soil, wait for a scab to develop (this takes about a week). This species’ colors and leaf shapes vary widely.

Sempervivum arachnoideum (Cobweb Houseleek)

Fast-growing and yields more offsets than you could possibly use! Plant cuttings directly in damp soil after cutting propagation, and you’ll observe roots forming in approximately a week.

Graptopetalum paraguayense (Ghost Plant)

A stunning hanging rosette succulent that may change color depending on the environment to orange, bronze, pink, and purple. It is quite simple to spread by leaves; you might even notice one growing on its own.

Echeveria colorata

Initially slow, but well worth the wait. Echeveria colorata starts out by producing lovely leaf sprouts with scarlet tips. Before removing the mother leaf from the new plant, wait until it has totally died.

Echeveria lilacina (Ghost Echeveria)

We frequently see the succulent Echeveria lilacina multiplying by itself. By planting leaves gently in soil with their roots down and leaf up, you can prevent the fast curling that occurs with leaves.

What You’ll Need:

  • slicing shears
  • gardening mitts (for handling spiny varieties)
  • a little trowel
  • potting soil for cacti and succulents
  • jars with sufficient drainage holes

Remove Some Leaves or Behead

Take a few leaves at random from your succulent plant, gently twisting each one off the stem without breaking it.

These can be cut off the bottom of the stem, which will be discarded, when it begins to grow lanky.

To remove a specific leaf from a plant, such as a Christmas cactus, you might need to use scissors.

If you’re “beheading,” cut the stem of the plant head cleanly with your scissors or clippers about an inch below the lower leaves.

Plant

When roots start to form, either choose a site in your garden that is ideal for planting or fill well-draining containers of your choosing with potting material.

Sunshine and well-drained soil are ideal for succulent growth. They get paler in the absence of sunlight, and they decompose in excess moisture.

When the sun is less powerful, such as in the early morning or late afternoon, plant in a sunny location.

To lift the cuttings above the edge of your container or garden surface, pile dirt higher. To stabilize the roots, gently tamp the earth down; do not water.

Water and Feed

It’s time to buy a succulent/cactus food at this stage, such as Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food, which is sold on Amazon. administer as directed by the manufacturer.

Succulents can also be propagated via cuttings that are placed on top of potting soil and allowed to callus off so they can root themselves in the soil.

Propagate succulent stems above water

Succulents can indeed be grown hydroponically, but you should use caution when doing so. Remove the lowest leaves from your mother plant by making a clean cut. After that, take a water jar and wrap it with plastic wrap. Make a few holes in it, and with the stem never actually touching the water, insert the exposed nodes about half an inch above the water. Whenever the water evaporates, top it off. Your roots should begin to expand in two to three weeks.

Propagate succulents on a wet paper towel

Leaving succulents on a paper towel is another approach to grow them. For a few days, let the ends of your succulent leaf cuttings dry out on a piece of paper towel on a tray. Spray water on the paper towel after a few days, then do it again after a few days. You should begin to notice roots and pups after a few weeks. Some gardeners will additionally cover the paper towel with a clear lid with holes or plastic wrap. You can eventually move your succulents into soil using both the jar and paper towel methods. Just remember that not all of your cuttings might grow successfully because the roots might be shocked by being transplanted into a different media.

Since succulents have so many fleshy leaves and may grow rapidly, you’ll always have room to experiment even if not all of your plants produce roots and pups. You’ll be able to share your succulents sooner than you think if you use leaf cuttings, new cactus soil, bright indirect light, and sporadic spritzes of water.