How To Save Succulents From Root Rot

  • Recognize the symptoms of succulent issues If you spot succulent rot, take immediate action.
  • Remove the plant from the ground and examine the roots.
  • Remove any extra soil and, if necessary, rinse the roots to assess their health.
  • Check the stem for symptoms of rot and remove any rotten leaves.
  • If root rot is discovered, throw away the used soil and prune the roots until the flesh is firm and healthy.
  • Eliminate and discard all rot indicators.
  • Replant any remaining rooted plants in new succulent soil with a little water.
  • Prepare all wholesome plant components, including leaves, for propagation.

Now that you are aware of the proper care for an overwatered succulent, you may save and multiply it. Please let me know what you think. Have you ever tried to preserve your own succulents? Please leave a remark if you have any queries. I’ll get back to you straight away!

P.P.S. Would you consider joining my Facebook group for cactus lovers? We discuss design, identification, propagation, and care of succulents. They’re a friendly bunch who would love to meet you!

When their roots decay, can succulents recover?

A succulent with a rotting root can be saved, but only if you can fix the problem right away. You can either let it dry naturally, cut the infected areas, or spread the healthy areas, depending on the severity of the rot. Otherwise, try not to overwater succulents because they can get by on very little water!

How is succulent root rot treated?

After that, clean the container and fill it with new dirt. A drop of antibacterial dish soap should be added to a bowl of water. Carefully clean the succulent’s roots with brand-new cotton swabs. The roots could also be submerged in a weak anti-fungal solution. Before repotting, allow the roots to totally dry out. For two weeks, let the plant remain dry, and keep a constant eye on it.

What does a succulent that is rotting look like?

The leaves of a rotting succulent will be dark from the bottom up. The stems would seem mushy and possibly black or brown. These are indications that overwatering has caused the plant to rot from the roots up. If the plant is left to rot on its own, it will eventually dissolve and turn into a mushy mess, leaving you with nothing but a rotting mess.

Overwatered Sedum burrito (burro’s tail or donkey’s tail) plant with rotting leaves

This succulent planter can’t be rescued, regrettably. Overwatering caused it to decay and turn to mush. (My mum absolutely adored this Mother’s Day gift that I gave her.)

Can a plant with rotted roots be repaired?

You must decide whether the plant may be rescued after root rot has been diagnosed. It is too late to preserve the plant if the entire root system is already mushy. Replanting the plant in new soil with proper drainage will help restore the plant’s health if it has any healthy, white, firm roots.

Clean the roots of the plants gently under running water and trim all brown, mushy roots with a pair of sharp scissors to prepare them for replanting. Just above the injured area, cut the healthy root. Work fast to replant in a short period of time. To prevent the spread of fungi to other plants or soil, sanitize the pruning shears with a solution of 1 part bleach to 3 parts water4 after all the roots have been cut down.

If left untreated, root rot will cause plants to die. Gardeners frequently don’t become aware of the issue until it has advanced because the earliest signs of root rot appear beneath the soil. Take action right once to fix the issue if plants start to exhibit signs of root rot, such as yellow leaves or slowed growth1.

The most vulnerable plants to root rot are those in soils that are too compact for water to drain out effectively or in containers with insufficient drainage holes. Garden plants are not immune to root rot, although container plants are most at danger. By adopting measures to enhance soil drainage prior to planting, the majority of garden root rot problems can be avoided. 2 While it may appear that too much water is the source of the problem, the truth is that too much water creates the ideal environment for the true culprit: fungus.

What can you do to revive a succulent?

Yes, I am aware that it seems illogical to remove extra water from the soil, but bear with me. This is the justification. Too much water has already put the succulent under stress, and exposure to sunlight makes matters worse. Direct sunlight is a big no because most succulents require brilliant indirect light.

Place the succulent that has been overwatered somewhere dry and bright, but out of direct sunshine.

2. Permit the roots to breathe.

Cut off any brown or black roots as they are already rotting. Dig the succulent out of the ground and remove any excess soil that has become stuck to the roots. Place the plant on a mesh or other strainer until the roots have had two to three days to air dry. Replant the roots in the pot once they have dried completely.

Remove the entire root system and any puckered, spotty, black, or brown stems if the roots are entirely rotted. The succulent stem can be buried in the ground for propagation.

Keep the overwatered succulent on a mesh screen or other strainer until the roots have had two to three days to air dry.

3. Modify the ground

You might not need to entirely alter your succulent if it is already rooted in homemade or commercial succulent soil. Algae (green living matter) typically grows on soil that is too wet. If so, it is your responsibility to remove all of the top soil from the area around your plants and replace it with new succulent soil.

Must I remove the dead leaves from my succulents?

One of the most enjoyable aspects of growing succulents, in our opinion, is getting to remove all the dried leaves from the area around your plant’s base. Most individuals find it to be quite calming and enjoyable since it is so enjoyable and genuinely healing.

Aside from that interesting fact, you should remove any dried leaves and blossoms for the sake of your plant’s health. You can maintain the happiness and health of your plants by carrying out this easy chore.

New growth, New plants, New Blooms

Energy can be recycled back into the plant by removing any spent, dried-up bloom stalks and dry leaves from your succulents. Your plant will be able to produce new growth, blooms, and occasionally new rosettes or pups if you do this. And who doesn’t desire succulents that are bigger and more numerous?

To remove, gently lift the plant’s healthy leaves, and then pull any dried-out leaves from beneath. They ought to be rather simple to remove. If they don’t, you can either leave them to dry out more or, if they are past their prime and unsightly, try to snap them off completely.

Good Air Flow

Humidity, wetness, and/or succulents make for a dangerous and occasionally lethal mix. You may provide your plants sufficient air circulation and make it easier for the soil to dry out by removing these dried leaves from beneath your plants. Removing these dried leaves will assist avoid the growth of rot, mildew, and/or illnesses, especially in humid or very rainy weather. Additionally, air circulation around the plant’s base is made possible by this procedure.

Less Pests

Succulents are susceptible to a wide range of pest attacks, just like most other plants. Getting rid of the dead leaves beneath your plant can also help deter pests. Little insects adore wet areas where they may hide and reproduce. A succulent’s compressed lower leaves are likely to retain moisture around the plant’s base, which will attract pests. Your plant has a higher chance of repelling these pests if you remove these leaves.

Another alluring nesting habitat for bugs, specifically aphids, can be bloom stalks. If you see that your blooms are starting to develop this bug problem, you can either completely remove the bloom stalk or treat the bloom with a mix of diluted rubbing alcohol and water. These bugs frequently spread disease to surrounding plants and flowers if the situation is left untreated. In order to remove bloom stalks from your plant, either gently wriggle the stalk back and forth or, if it hasn’t dried up yet, snap or cut it low.

Do we have any ASMR fans out there??

We made this little movie to demonstrate how to take these leaves off your plants, but since we adore succulents, it also serves as our take on ASMR. Am I correct?

(According to The Urban Dictionary, ASMR’s sole function is to help people unwind. The goal of ASMR videos is to relax the viewer by sending a tingling sensation down their spine or back.

Succulents can they grow new roots?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.

Why is the succulent’s bottom dying?

Because most succulent species are not particularly cold hardy and most die if they experience temperatures below 50F (10C) for an extended period of time, most succulent are susceptible to frost damage. Succulents are adapted to living in hot and dry climates (Jade plants are native to Africa, and aloe vera plants are native to the Arabian peninsula).

The ideal temperature range for succulent growth is roughly 55F-80F (13C-27C), making them considerably better house plants.

When succulents are exposed to cold or even frost, the liquid that is contained inside the leaves freezes, causing the leaves and stems to turn brown or black and mushy.

Move your succulent to a room or part of your yard where the temperature is between 55F and 80F (13C and 27C). Make sure the leaves are not in direct touch with any windows, as these areas of the house can get much colder than the rest of the house. Reduce watering for the time being.

The harm from cold shouldn’t necessarily get worse in the short term once the succulent is in a more stable environment.

Wait until the mushy, cold-damaged portion of the succulent dries up and develops a callus if the leaves of the succulent feel gooey.

Cut the leaf back to below the damaged section once the mushy portion has dried out. Cold-damaged succulent areas normally do not recover, but if the damage is not too severe, the succulent plant can be preserved as a whole.

In order to avoid additional potential issues, you should only restart watering the succulent once the callus of the leaf cut has completely healed over. Cold damage increases the danger of root rot.

After being damaged by cold, succulents can ultimately produce new leaves and begin to regain their natural appearance, however it frequently takes a lot of patience.

Key Takeaways:

  • Overwatering and wet soil are the causes of succulent plants dying. The soil must completely dry up before watering succulents again because they are drought-tolerant plants. Succulent leaves rot from the roots when they are placed in moist soil.
  • Succulent leaves shrink and wilt owing to drought stress, overwatering, insufficient watering frequency, or soil that has baked hard and repels water from the surface. Succulents’ leaves are water reservoirs, and when the roots do not have access to enough moisture, the leaves wilt.
  • Transplant shock or wet soils are the causes of succulents dying after repotting. A sudden difference in the amount of light, soil, and moisture causes succulents to wither. Repotted succulents may not be able to survive the new soil’s excessive moisture retention, which will cause the leaves to turn yellow, brown, or black.
  • Because they are submerged or don’t receive enough sunshine, succulent leaves wither at the bottom. Succulents and succulents that are drought-stressed When a succulent receives excessive shadow, it diverts its energy toward protecting the top leaves, which causes the lower leaves to wither and fall off near the base of the plant.
  • Due to freezing temperatures and frost, the majority of succulents lose their leaves and die back. Succulents typically prefer temperatures between 55 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13C-27C). The moisture stores in the succulent plants’ leaves are harmed by freezing temperatures, which causes the plant to turn black and die.