How To Repot A Succulent

1. To get started, fill your new planter 3/4 full with pre-mixed succulent or cactus soil, which is often available at any nearby nursery or home improvement store. You can combine standard potting soil and perlite in equal amounts to try making your own soil. Make sure the planter is at least 2″ wider than the diameter of the succulent if you are relocating it to a larger container. Your succulent will have plenty of room to expand and become stable as a result.

2. Remove the succulent from its present container and gently separate the roots. To loosen the roots and remove the soil, you can “tickle” them from the bottom. Consider this phase as a pleasant stretch for the roots. They can stabilize in a larger pot and acclimate to their new soil by being spread out and lengthened. This is the ideal time to remove any dead leaves and brush away any dead roots from the plant’s base. While doing this, be careful to brush away any old or extra dirt.

3. To support the plant, dig a small hole in the fresh dirt, lay the succulent in it, and then gently cover the roots with extra potting soil. Don’t cover any leaves or allow them lay on top of the soil; only add enough to cover the plant’s base. As a result of the leaves absorbing too much moisture from the soil, this will cause them to rot.

4. After the plant has stabilized, you can add colored rocks, pebbles, or sand to give your new succulent plant in a pot a unique touch. Make sure the material drains adequately if you do add something on top so that water can reach the soil underneath.

5. In this case, the situation dictates how to water. Depending on the type of plant and when it was last watered, a succulent that has been repotted may require different first watering. However, it is typically advised to hold off on watering your succulent for at least a week following repotting. Make sure the soil is dry before giving it a good soaking without drowning it.

6. Enjoy your succulent in a new pot! Depending on your environment, sunlight, etc., water your succulent once per week to three weeks to keep it healthy. Water should be applied when the soil is dry. Leave it alone until it dries if it is still wet. They are tough little plants, so try different things to see what works best for your new addition.

How should a newbie repot a succulent?

Begin by tilting the plant sideways and snatching it by the stem base. Shake the container a little after giving it a little tap on the bottom. The plant can also be removed from its previous pot by gently pulling on the stem after loosening the soil with a stick or your hands. Chopsticks can be used to further loosen the dirt if you are still unable to remove the succulent after doing so.

Instead, you can slowly hammer the old pot until it breaks. This would enable you to take the plant out of its old pot without damaging its root system, even though you would be sacrificing it.

After removing the succulents from the old pot, you should just brush the soil away from the roots or give them a light tap or tickle to loosen as much soil as you can. If you decide to wash the roots with water, be careful to allow them to dry for three to five days in a cool location out of the sun. If the roots of your succulents have grown too long, you can also clip them.

Fill the new pot with soil mixture by at least two-thirds before you plant your succulent. Once finished, carefully lay the succulent in the center and completely cover the roots with additional soil. To keep the succulent’s leaves from rotting, make sure they are entirely above the soil.

Place the succulent gently in the center and completely encircle the roots with additional soil.

If you want to repot a cactus, follow the same procedures as above. To prevent getting pricked by the thorns, just be sure to use a kitchen tong or wear gloves, such as gardening gloves, work gloves, or leather gloves, before you carry out the next tasks.

On the other side, repotting succulent arrangements is fairly challenging. However, to make things simpler, carefully remove each plant from its previous pot, taking care not to damage any of the roots. To accomplish this, make cuts through the soil and roots, then scrape off as much of the old dirt as you can from the roots. When you’re finished, carefully examine your succulents’ roots before putting them in their new pot. Make careful to leave any plants with damaged roots out of the pot for two to three days, or until the roots callus over, if you notice any.

Does repotting succulents require special soil?

Every soil mixture contains both organic and mineral components. Mineral matter, such as clay, silt, and sand, support soil drainage, whereas organic matter, such as humus and decomposing plant tissue, serves to retain moisture in the soil and give nutrients to the plant.

Because succulents can withstand drought and don’t require constant moisture, their potting soil should be porous, well-draining, and contain less organic matter than typical indoor soil mixtures. Ideal soil is a loose, granular mixture with a good amount of sand and perlite or pumice.

When ought to succulents be potted again?

Evergreen succulents have always captured my heart. Succulents are low maintenance plants that thrive in containers because to their unusual forms and thick leaves; I have a large collection of these well-liked varieties.

Repotting succulents every two years is a good general rule of thumb, if only to give them access to new, fertile soil. The beginning of a succulent’s growing season is the optimal time to repot it because it provides the plant its best chance of surviving. My gardeners, Ryan and Wilmer, took advantage of the snowy weather earlier this week to repot many succulent plants and propagate a variety of cuttings. Here are some pictures of the steps we took.

In times of drought, succulents, sometimes known as fat plants, store water in their fleshy leaves, stems, or stem-root systems. Because of their eye-catching shapes, succulents are frequently planted as attractive plants.

I needed to repot a few of the succulents in my collection either they had outgrown their pots or I wanted to relocate them into more attractive clay containers.

He stamps my name and the year the pot was produced on the reverse side. When I host big events in my home, they invariably look fantastic.

To aid in drainage, a clay shard is placed over the hole. Additionally, I like using clay pots because they permit adequate aeration and moisture to reach the plant via the sides.

We always keep the shards from broken pots; it’s a fantastic method to use those parts again.

Wilmer carefully takes a succulent from its pot without damaging any of the roots.

Wilmer then conducts a meticulous test to determine if the pot is the proper size for the plant. He picks a pot just a hair bigger than the plant’s original container.

Prills are the name for osmocote particles. A core of nutrients composed of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium is covered by the prill’s beige shell.

For the finest drainage, we mix equal parts of sand, perlite, and vermiculite for succulents. The correct soil mixture will also aid in promoting rapid root growth and provide young roots with quick anchoring.

Wait a few days before watering the succulents after repotting to give them time to become used to the new soil.

Wilmer shifts to the following plant. This one too need a little maintenance attention. He picked up any fallen leaves.

In order to promote new development, Wilmer lightly pruned the roots after manually loosening the root ball.

Wilmer inserted the plant into the pot after adding some Osmocote and a little amount of potting soil.

The pale blue-gray leaves of Echevaria runyonii ‘Topsy turvy’ curve upward, are prominently inversely keeled on the bottom surface, and have leaf tips that point inward toward the center of the plant.

Echeverias are among the most alluring succulents, and plant aficionados greatly respect them for their brilliant colors and lovely rosette shapes.

An aeonium is a succulent with rosette-like leaves that grows quickly. Aeonium is a varied genus that includes little or medium-sized plants, stemless or shrub-like, and plants that favor sun or shade.

Succulents should be placed on a table so that they can get enough of natural light even when the sun isn’t shining directly on their pots.

Moreover, propagation is fairly simple. Here, Ryan uses sharp pruners to cut a three to four-inch portion of stem off the mother plant.

There should be about a half-inch of stem showing. A handful of them are ready to be planted here.

Ryan provides plenty of space for the plants. There will be plenty to use in mixed urns during the summer if all of these take root and grow into succulent plants. Four to six weeks following planting, new growth should start to show, at which point each plant should be repotted independently.

Inside my main greenhouse, all of my priceless plant collections are kept on long, sliding tables. They all have such lovely looks. Which succulents are your favorites? Please share your feedback in the spaces below.

How can a succulent be replanted without dying?

Select a container that is roughly 10% larger than your succulent. Avoid choosing a pot that is too large as it can startle them. Additionally, because they hold more water, your succulents may become overwatered if they remain wet for an extended period of time.

This step is not required. There is no need to cover the holes with such materials if the pot is very porous and has good drainage holes that still permit water to travel through them.

In the bottom of your new pot, add one to two inches of dirt and lightly compact it around the drainage hole.

By doing this, you should avoid damaging your succulent when you repot it.

  • You can: cultivate your succulents in plastic containers;
  • Tap the bottom of the pot, then gradually slide it out: Holding your new plant firmly by the stems or leaves, turn it sideways, and tap the grow pot’s base until the plant slides out. To help your succulent escape the pot, you might also give it a little tug.
  • If you don’t need the plastic pot any more and prefer to avoid having to handle the plant too much, you may also cut the pot out using a flush cutter.
  • If your succulent is grown in clay or another material:
  • Take each stem out one at a time.
  • To avoid touching the tendrils too much while repotting the plant, wrap a cloth around it and carefully ease it out.

Before planting, use your fingers to gently loosen the roots. If the roots on your succulent are particularly thick, you can trim about an inch from the root ball and use a clean, sharp knife to cut through the knotted roots. By doing this, the dirt in the bigger pot should begin to fill with fresh root growth. Just leave it alone if the root system is modest.

Remove at least a third of the old potting soil that is surrounding the plant. As they have likely ingested a significant portion of the nutrients in the old potting mix, this should enable your succulent to receive all the nutrients it requires.

Ensure that your succulent is erect and centered in the arrangement. After that, use the new soil mixture to fill in around the rootball and gently press it down so the rootball is surrounded.

After you’ve finished repotting your succulent, give it at least a week to become used to its new surroundings before giving it a nice soak in water. Your succulents should experience less shock as a result of this.

Succulents can be repotted into bigger containers to promote new development, which will help them stay healthy and get bigger. Nevertheless, certain plants don’t like to be transplanted, so exercise caution and make sure you’re doing it at the right time.

Should succulents be watered soon after after repotting?

The reputation of succulents as being “easy. There is still a lot to learn about these oh-so-Pinterest-worthy plants, even though they would make decent starter plants for someone with a less-than-green thumb. Your succulent’s luscious green leaves could turn mushy, wilted, and brown if it doesn’t receive enough sunlight, water, soil, and container. If one of your summertime projects involves repotting succulents, be sure to read these six suggestions first.

Understand your plants before repotting succulents

Your local garden center was your first stop for an equally colorful assortment of succulents after you pinned a picture of a trendy combination of succulents in a stunning container. You then ordered our Large Mixed Material Terrarium to replicate the Pin. Understanding each plant’s needs for heat, water, and sunlight is crucial before beginning the job. Many people believe that all succulents require the same types of growing circumstances, however each species actually has different requirements. Only a few succulents will grow if you place several of plants in a pot with different requirements. You can repot your succulents into communal containers once you’ve assessed your plants and determined which ones would thrive together. More advice on how to do this may be found in our piece on repotting succulents into terrariums.

Beware of glued-on accessories

You recently purchased a cute prefabricated succulent garden from a big-box retailer, and you now want to repot the plants. You might be surprised to learn that these ready-made succulent gardens frequently contain “On the soil and the plants, there are embellishments like rocks and imitation flowers. Your succulents will benefit from being repotted because the glued-on rocks may be preventing them from accessing the water they require. While removing each glued-on ornament can be time-consuming and tiresome, your succulents will appreciate it once they are free. If you like prepared gardens’ convenience, you might consider our DIY Terrarium Kit, which comes with everything you need for repotting succulents but without the soil “glued-on decorations!

Don’t skip the drainage rocks

You undoubtedly already know that succulents require adequate drainage, and you may have also heard that adding rocks or stones to the bottom of your planter will facilitate this. A drainage layer is required if a container lacks drainage holes, but it can also add a lovely ornamental touch to a glass container or terrarium. You need a well-draining soil in addition to a drainage layer to assist shed excess water, which avoids root rot. This brings us to…

Supplement with perlite

When it comes to giving your repotted succulents a well-draining soil, you’re halfway there if you bought a succulent potting mix at your local garden center. Your plants will prefer a 1:1 ratio of succulent soil and perlite, despite the fact that many potting mixes promise to have all the nutrients and characteristics you need when repotting succulents. Perlite helps with water drainage when well included with your potting soil. You may get it from any garden supply store.

Don’t water right away

Your first reaction after rehoming a plant might be to water it. However, it’s recommended to wait a few days before watering succulents after repotting. If you attempt to water your plants too soon, the roots will not have had time to heal and will be vulnerable to root rot.

Avoid sunburn

Make cautious to protect your succulents against sunburns the same way you protect your skin from sunburn! A freshly potted succulent will frequently develop wilted, mushy leaves and brown blotches, also known as a succulent sunburn, if placed in direct sunlight. It’s crucial to gradually acclimate succulents to direct sunlight when repotting them.