How To Replant Cactus Plants

Plants should be hardened off (acclimated) to direct sunlight and frost by being placed outside in a location with morning sun and afternoon shade before the last date for frost (early to mid-May). Unless frost is anticipated, avoid going outside at night. Bring plants inside if there is a threat of frost; let them outside the next day if it has warmed up above freezing. To keep the soil moist but not waterlogged, water as needed. Continue for around 10 days, after which the plants will be prepared for planting and unaffected by either frost or sunburn.

All hardy cacti and succulent species need soil that drains quickly. The ideal soils are loamy, rocky, or sandy.

Place succulents and cacti in your garden on a slope, on a raised area (like a berm), or in a level place that doesn’t retain water after rain or snowfall. Pick a bed that receives direct sunlight.

To guarantee appropriate drainage in heavy clay soils, it is crucial to replace half or more of the dirt from a 10×10 or bigger hole with coarse sand and small gravel that have been thoroughly mixed with the remaining soil. To the planting hole, add a handful or two of Yum Yum Mix.

Utilize a planting mixture consisting of two parts garden soil, one part coarse sand, and one part aggregate (coarse perlite, red volcanic scoria or expanded shale). To the dirt, add some Yum Yum Mix.

planting a pot indoors Use Black Gold Cactus Mix and expanded shale to mix with the sand for indoor potted plants (or red volcanic scoria). Use a ratio of 2:1 potting soil to coarse sand to shale or scoria.

Transplanting bare-root is recommended for cacti, agaves, and tap-rooted succulents (Aloinopsis, Titanopsis, and Nananthus). For a few days, allow the soil in the pot to dry out. The earth should slip away from the roots once you remove the pot and gently loosen it. Any broken roots should be cut off. 2 to 3 inches of earth should be added to the planting hole. After that, uniformly distribute the roots like a skirt and fill the hole with the adjusted soil. The soil should be on top of the plant’s base. To keep the plant’s base from drying out and from coming into contact with damp soil during the winter, mulch the area with a 12-inch layer of pea-sized gravel.

Ruschia, Delosperma, Sedums, and other succulents with fibrous roots don’t need to be transplanted bare-root; instead, the root ball should be scored and roughed up like other perennials.

When growing cacti in the summer, place a tall rock or board on their south side to provide shade for 7–10 days. This aids with cactus acclimatization and prevents sunburning of the stem. Using Bobbex ANIMAL Repellent 32 oz., repel rabbits. Ready-to-Use.

Wait a day or two (but no longer) before watering bare-root cacti and tap-rooted succulents to give the roots time to callus over any broken or damaged regions. You can start watering additional succulents right soon. Including Medina Fish Blend as a root stimulant to promote robust new root growth, at a rate of 1 tablespoon per gallon of water. For the first month or two, use Medina Fish Blend multiple times a day.

fresh plants After transplanting, outside beds should receive watering at first once every 5 to 7 days for around a month. During the summer heat, cacti and succulents benefit from routine irrigation and develop quickly. If there hasn’t been enough rain after the first year, most cacti species simply require a good bath once every 2-4 weeks in the spring and summer.

New outdoor potted plants need weekly watering during the summer, especially if it’s hot and dry outside. Indoor plants in pots require watering every 7 to 10 days.

Prepare Your Tools and Supplies

Depending on the size and degree of spikyness of the plant, specific instruments are needed for cactus transplantation. For instance, towels and/or newspapers may not be required while transplanting smaller cacti, whereas larger cacti may need a complete complement of safety gear.

No of the size, handling cacti is always safer when done with thick, protective gloves.

Remove the Cactus from the Old Pot

If required, loosen the dirt around the pot’s edges with a dull knife or trowel. If necessary, you can use the towel to handle the cactus or wrap it in many layers of newspaper to make it easier to hold. Lay the cactus flat on the surface of your work area after gently wriggling the root ball out of the old pot.

Loosen the Root Ball & Discard the Old Soil

Once the cactus has been removed from its old pot, the root ball should be loosened and the old soil discarded. This can occasionally be a delicate process depending on how root-bound the plant is. Slow down and take care not to uproot too many roots.

Inspect the Roots and Trim if Necessary

While the roots are exposed, it is a good idea to check them over for any signs of pests or diseases. If necessary, prune back any sick or dead roots and use a fungicide.

Choose the New Pot

For your cactus, pick a clay or terracotta pot if you have a tendency to overwater plants. Cacti can grow in any type of potting container, although unglazed clay pots are better since they can absorb extra moisture from the soil and help limit overwatering. No matter what kind of pot you select, make sure the bottom has a drainage hole.

Plant the Cactus in the New Pot

To ensure that the cactus will be planted at the same depth as its previous container, fill the bottom of the new pot with the cactus soil combination (you may buy cactus soil in stores or make it yourself). Place the cactus in the pot gently using the towel or newspaper and hold it there while you add dirt to the remaining space in the pot.

The newly transplanted cactus needs time to adapt to its new environment, so avoid watering it right immediately. You can resume your regular watering regimen after about a week.

Cacti are resilient and adaptable, and the majority of kinds do well when transplanted as long as they were in good condition before being repotted. Make sure to replant your cactus in the same spot where it was originally located so that it can continue to get the same amount of light and ventilation as it did before it was moved.

Cacti are desert plants, thus to promote new development, they need a lot of sunlight. Most cacti kinds thrive in a sunny windowsill that faces south or west. One of the best ways to promote new growth is to leave your cactus outdoors in full light throughout the summer if you live somewhere with warm summers.

Can I cut a cactus and grow it again?

Probably the most frequent and straightforward method of propagation is stem cuttings. Stem cuttings are an effective method for multiplying many cacti. Stem cuttings from an existing plant are removed, then left to calluse and dry out. Eventually, the cuttings will begin to take root from the cut end and grow into a new plant.

Some cacti that are frequently multiplied via stem cuttings include:

  • Opuntia or prickly pears
  • Collapsed cactus
  • Globular and pincushion cacti

How do you move a cactus without damaging it?

There aren’t many ways to repot a cactus without getting pricked and hurt. Wearing nitrile coated gloves (may be two pairs or double coated) and utilizing folded newspaper may be sufficient to handle small to medium sized cactus.

Utilizing silicone tongs is an additional technique for handling little cactus (not metal ones). Be very cautious with your cactus and avoid pinching it. Use foam sponges or anything comparable as well.

You must be careful not to harm the roots that are wrapped around the main root ball. Try to remove a cactus from its pot by turning the pot vertically. If you wait three to five days before repotting your cactus, it should be simple to perform.

Use this technique if your cactus isn’t coming out on its own. The top soil layer should be removed with a thin wooden stick or something similar. Then, while holding the cactus and using folded newspaper for particularly spiky cacti, gently tap the pot against the table to see if you can slide it out of the pot. By pulling your cactus in this way, you risk damaging its incredibly thin and delicate roots.

How to handle and repot a large or tall cactus with sharp spines

You must exercise extra caution if your cactus is large and tall, grows outdoors, or both. When moving your cactus, put on your nitrile-coated gloves and use some folded newspaper. Additionally, you could wrap your cactus in a large towel.

If you’re having trouble getting your cactus out of the pot, try using a wooden stick to push the rootball out of the drainage holes.

You can smash the pot or chop the cactus if nothing else works to get it out. If your cactus still won’t emerge after you cut the pot, you can use a hose to spray water on the roots of the plant. This will soften a rootball. You don’t want to hurt your plant, so always be kind. Remember that you must wait for the roots to dry after spraying them before potting them into a new container.

To ensure that the roots of your cactus dry out, hang it. Put something underneath the huge cactus to provide support (for example some bars under the cactus so it is hanging). Additionally, hanging it outside the pot will help the roots dry out more quickly.

Before planting the cactus, you must dry the roots if you used a hose to shower them.

After you have removed your cactus from an old pot

You must clean the rootball and get rid of old soil after taking the cactus out of its old container. Dry soil should make this task simple. However, if the soil has dried and you are unable to clean it, put the rootball in a plastic container and soak it for 20 to 40 minutes in warm water (about 122 degrees F or 50 Celsius).

Wash the rootball with water to remove any remaining soil after it has softened. Dry the rootballs of your cactus for 12 to 30 hours to ensure full drying.

A helpful suggestion would be to hang your cactus so that the roots are upright. This will hasten the cacti’s transition to a new pot and preserve the roots’ healthy natural shapes. The rootballs of your cacti will sprout more plants if you wash and soak them in warm water.

Take a look at cacti’s roots

Examine the roots after removing your cactus and removing any remaining soil by shaking (or washing) it off. You must inspect the roots to look for rotting and parasites. You must use micro-tipped pruning shears to remove any visible rotting roots.

Another option is to use tiny scissors. However, be sure to sanitize the blades with alcohol, a flame, or boiling water and antibacterial soap before cutting any bad roots.

Wash off the dirt and dab some alcohol on cuts if you notice any damage or cuts in the roots. Before putting the cactus in the pot, let the roots dry.

Place the cactus in its new pot

Place your cactus in the pot after looking at the roots. It ought to already be partially filled with gravel or rocks, charcoal, and dirt on top. Insert your cactus, then begin slowly filling in the sides with soil.

While adding the soil and once you are finished, pat the earth lightly without using any instruments. Be sure to leave the top layer’s soil free by 1-2 inches. Your cacti may be more susceptible to root rot if the dirt is overfilled in the pot.

You can water your cactus after about 5-7 days. Add extra soil on top if it has greatly drained. Two to three weeks after repotting, a good cactus should become sturdy and feel at ease in the soil. Your cactus’ roots are unhealthy if it is unsteady and need additional support.

What to do after you have repotted your cacti

You must give your cactus a 7–10 day period of relaxation after repotting. When your cactus are resting, avoid watering them. Additionally, throughout these 7 to 10 days, you need to stop any water from the cacti’s stem from evaporating. The stem will dry out if you don’t do this, which is really crucial.

Take your cactus to a cool, dark location, and cover it with a white transparent plastic veggie bag to make sure water is not evaporating from the stem. Spray your cactus with little warm water after 4-5 days and cover it again if the room becomes too hot. Take the cactus out and plant them in their permanent location after 7–10 days have passed. Additionally, after repotting, water them for the first time.

During the first month or two, you may notice additional growth and possibly even flowering if the repotting was successful.

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Can a cactus be dug out and planted again?

Mature cactus plants may need to be relocated. It might be difficult to move cacti in the landscape, especially huge ones. Due to the spines, thorns, and other deadly armor most of these plants have, this technique really puts you in more danger than the plant. Cactus transplants can be carried out throughout the year, although the optimal period is in the cooler months. Here are some pointers for safely transplanting a cactus without endangering yourself or the plant.

Once transplanted, do you water the cactus?

When you’ve decided whether to repot your cactus, it’s time to grab your equipment and exchange the old soil or container with the new one. Fresh soil is an excellent idea even though every cactus doesn’t require a new container. Only plants that are pot-bound require a larger pot.

Gently tong, glove, or wrap the plant out of its pot. If the soil is dry, they normally come out easily, but you might need to use a trowel to remove the soil around the edges. Plant the cactus at the same depth it was growing in the old soil after shaking off the old soil. Put it in a bright southeast or east window, filling in the area around the roots with your medium.

Not watering the plant right away while it is accustomed to being handled and new soil conditions is one of the most crucial repotting cactus advices. A few weeks later, you can water the plant, let it dry up, and then water it once more.